|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Morey, S.L.; Shriver, J.F.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title The effects of Halmahera on the Indonesian throughflow Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 1999 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 104 Issue C10 Pages 23281-23296
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding ONR Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 769
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Murphy, S.J.; Hurlburt, H.E.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title The connectivity of eddy variability in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 1999 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 104 Issue C1 Pages 1431-1453
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 532
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Murray, C.P.; Morey, S.L.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title Interannual variability of upper ocean vorticity balances in the Gulf of Alaska Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2001 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 106 Issue C3 Pages 4479-4491
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 508
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Murty, V.S.N.
Title A new technique for the estimation of sea surface salinity in the tropical Indian Ocean from OLR Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2004 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 109 Issue C12 Pages
Keywords sea surface salinity; tropical Indian Ocean; outgoing longwave radiation; effective oceanic layer; 1997-1998 El Nino event; interannual variability
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 453
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Müller, M.; Arbic, B.K.; Mitrovica, J.X.
Title Secular trends in ocean tides: Observations and model results Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 116 Issue C5 Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 306
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nakano, H.; Suginohara, N.
Title Importance of the eastern Indian Ocean for the abyssal Pacific Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2002 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 107 Issue C12 Pages 12-1-12-14
Keywords Indian Ocean; Adélie; circumpolar deep water
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 827
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nelson, A.D.; Arbic, B.K.; Zaron, E.D.; Savage, A.C.; Richman, J.G.; Buijsman, M.C.; Shriver, J.F.
Title Toward Realistic Nonstationarity of Semidiurnal Baroclinic Tides in a Hydrodynamic Model Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans
Volume 124 Issue 9 Pages 6632-6641
Keywords
Abstract Semidiurnal baroclinic tide sea surface height (SSH) variance and semidiurnal nonstationary variance fraction (SNVF) are compared between a hydrodynamic model and altimetry for the low- to middle-latitude global ocean. Tidal frequencies are aliased by similar to 10-day altimeter sampling, which makes it impossible to unambiguously identify nonstationary tidal signals from the observations. In order to better understand altimeter sampling artifacts, the model was analyzed using its native hourly outputs and by subsampling it in the same manner as altimeters. Different estimates of the semidiurnal nonstationary and total SSH variance are obtained with the model depending on whether they are identified in the frequency domain or wave number domain and depending on the temporal sampling of the model output. Five sources of ambiguity in the interpretation of the altimetry are identified and briefly discussed. When the model and altimetry are analyzed in the same manner, they display qualitatively similar spatial patterns of semidiurnal baroclinic tides. The SNVF typically correlates above 80% at all latitudes between the different analysis methods and above 60% between the model and altimetry. The choice of analysis methodology was found to have a profound effect on estimates of the semidiurnal baroclinic SSH variance with the wave number domain methodology underestimating the semidiurnal nonstationary and total SSH variances by 68% and 66%, respectively. These results produce a SNVF estimate from altimetry that is biased low by a factor of 0.92. This bias is primarily a consequence of the ambiguity in the separation of tidal and mesoscale signals in the wave number domain.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1086
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Neto, A.G.; Palter, J.; Bower, A.; Furey, H.; Xu. X.
Title Labrador Sea Water transport across the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans
Volume Accepted Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Labrador Sea Water (LSW) is a major component of the deep limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, yet LSW transport pathways and their variability lack a complete description. A portion of the LSW exported from the subpolar gyre is advected eastward along the North Atlantic Current and must contend with the Mid‐Atlantic Ridge before reaching the eastern basins of the North Atlantic. Here, we analyze observations from a mooring array and satellite altimetry, together with outputs from a hindcast ocean model simulation, to estimate the mean transport of LSW across the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ), a primary gateway for the eastward transport of the water mass. The LSW transport estimated from the 25‐year altimetry record is 5.3 ± 2.9 Sv, where the error represents the combination of observational variability and the uncertainty in the projection of the surface velocities to the LSW layer. Current velocities modulate the interannual to higher frequency variability of the LSW transport at the CGFZ, while the LSW thickness becomes important on longer time scales. The modeled mean LSW transport for 1993‐2012 is higher than the estimate from altimetry, at 8.2 ± 4.1 Sv. The modeled LSW thickness decreases substantially at the CGFZ between 1996 and 2009, consistent with an observed decline in LSW volume in the Labrador Sea after 1994. We suggest that satellite altimetry and continuous hydrographic measurements in the central Labrador Sea, supplemented by profiles from Argo floats, could be sufficient to quantify the LSW transport at the CGFZ.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1108
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nyadjro, E.S.; Rydbeck, A.V.; Jensen, T.G.; Richman, J.G.; Shriver, J.F.
Title On the Generation and Salinity Impacts of Intraseasonal Westward Jets in the Equatorial Indian Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans
Volume 125 Issue 6 Pages e2020JC016066
Keywords ndian Ocean; intraseasonal variability; westward Jet; intraseasonal oscillations; mixed layer salinity; surface currents
Abstract While westerly winds dominate the equatorial Indian Ocean and generate the well‐known eastward flowing Wyrtki Jets during boreal spring and fall, there is evidence of a strong westward surface jet during winter that is swifter than eastward currents during that season. A weaker westward jet is found in summer. In this study, we report the occurrence, characteristics, and intraseasonal variability of this westward jet and its impact on mixed layer salinity in the equatorial Indian Ocean using the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) reanalysis with the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA). The westward jet typically occurs in the upper 50 m, above an eastward flowing equatorial undercurrent, with peak westward volume transport of approximately −8 Sv. The westward jet builds up gradually, decays rapidly, and is primarily forced by local intraseasonal wind stress anomalies generated by atmospheric intraseasonal convection. Westward acceleration of the jet occurs when the dominant intraseasonal westward wind anomaly is not balanced by the zonal pressure gradient (ZPG) force. The intraseasonal westward jet generates strong horizontal advection and is the leading cause of mixed layer freshening in the western equatorial Indian Ocean. Without it, a saltier mixed layer would persist and weaken any barrier layers. Existing barrier layers are strengthened following the passage of freshwater‐laden westward jets. Deceleration of the westward jet occurs when the eastward ZPG becomes increasingly important and the westward intraseasonal wind anomalies weaken. A rapid reversal of atmospheric intraseasonal convection‐driven surface winds eventually terminates the westward jet.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1118
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nyadjro, E.S.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; Shriver, J.F.
Title The role of salinity on the dynamics of the Arabian Sea mini warm pool Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 117 Issue C9 Pages n/a-n/a
Keywords Arabian Sea; Argo; HYCOM; SMOS; salinity; warm pool
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 271
Permanent link to this record

2000 Levy Avenue
Building A, Suite 292
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2741
Phone: (850) 644-4581
Fax: (850) 644-4841
contact@coaps.fsu.edu

© 2022 Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS)