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Author (up) Bhardwaj, A.; Misra, V.
Title The role of air-sea coupling in the downscaled hydroclimate projection over Peninsular Florida and the West Florida Shelf Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 53 Issue 5-6 Pages 2931-2947
Keywords
Abstract A comparative analysis of two sets of downscaled simulations of the current climate and the future climate projections over Peninsular Florida (PF) and the West Florida Shelf (WFS) is presented to isolate the role of high-resolution air-sea coupling. In addition, the downscaled integrations are also compared with the much coarser, driving global model projection to examine the impact of grid resolution of the models. The WFS region is habitat for significant marine resources, which has both commercial and recreational value. Additionally, the hydroclimatic features of the WFS and PF contrast each other. For example, the seasonal cycle of surface evaporation in these two regions are opposite in phase to one another. In this study, we downscale the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) simulations of the late twentieth century and the mid-twenty-first century (with reference concentration pathway 8.5 emission scenario) using an atmosphere only Regional Spectral Model (RSM) at 10 km grid resolution. In another set, we downscale the same set of CCSM4 simulations using the coupled RSM-Regional Ocean Model System (RSMROMS) at 10 km grid resolution. The comparison of the twentieth century simulations suggest significant changes to the SST simulation over WFS from RSMROMS relative to CCSM4, with the former reducing the systematic errors of the seasonal mean SST over all seasons except in the boreal summer season. It may be noted that owing to the coarse resolution of CCSM4, the comparatively shallow bathymetry of the WFS and the sharp coastline along PF is poorly defined, which is significantly rectified at 10 km grid spacing in RSMROMS. The seasonal hydroclimate over PF and the WFS in the twentieth century simulation show significant bias in all three models with CCSM4 showing the least for a majority of the seasons, except in the wet June-July-August (JJA) season. In the JJA season, the errors of the surface hydroclimate over PF is the least in RSMROMS. The systematic errors of surface precipitation and evaporation are more comparable between the simulations of CCSM4 and RSMROMS, while they differ the most in moisture flux convergence. However, there is considerable improvement in RSMROMS compared to RSM simulations in terms of the seasonal bias of the hydroclimate over WFS and PF in all seasons of the year. This suggests the potential rectification impact of air-sea coupling on dynamic downscaling of CCSM4 twentieth century simulations. In terms of the climate projection in the decades of 2041-2060, the RSMROMS simulation indicate significant drying of the wet season over PF compared to moderate drying in CCSM4 and insignificant changes in the RSM projection. This contrasting projection is also associated with projected warming of SSTs along the WFS in RSMROMS as opposed to warming patterns of SST that is more zonal and across the WFS in CCSM4.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1082
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Author (up) Bhardwaj, A.; Misra, V.
Title Monitoring the Indian Summer Monsoon Evolution at the Granularity of the Indian Meteorological Sub-divisions using Remotely Sensed Rainfall Products Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 9 Pages 1080
Keywords Indian Summer Monsoon; GPM; TRMM satellite precipitation; meteorological sub-divisions
Abstract We make use of satellite-based rainfall products from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to objectively define local onset and demise of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) at the spatial resolution of the meteorological subdivisions defined by the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). These meteorological sub-divisions are the operational spatial scales for official forecasts issued by the IMD. Therefore, there is a direct practical utility to target these spatial scales for monitoring the evolution of the ISM. We find that the diagnosis of the climatological onset and demise dates and its variations from the TMPA product is quite similar to the rain gauge based analysis of the IMD, despite the differences in the duration of the two datasets. This study shows that the onset date variations of the ISM have a significant impact on the variations of the seasonal length and seasonal rainfall anomalies in many of the meteorological sub-divisions: for example, the early or later onset of the ISM is associated with longer and wetter or shorter and drier ISM seasons, respectively. It is shown that TMPA dataset (and therefore its follow up Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG)) could be usefully adopted for monitoring the onset of the ISM and therefore extend its use to anticipate the potential anomalies of the seasonal length and seasonal rainfall anomalies of the ISM in many of the Indian meteorological sub-divisions. View Full-Text
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1026
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Author (up) Bhardwaj, A.; Misra, V.; Mishra, A.; Wootten, A.; Boyles, R.; Bowden, J. H.; Terando, A. J.
Title Downscaling future climate change projections over Puerto Rico using a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Climatic Change Abbreviated Journal
Volume 147 Issue 1-2 Pages 133-147
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Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 550
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Author (up) Buchanan, S.; Misra, V.; Bhardwaj, A.
Title https://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/joc.5450 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Climatology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 38 Issue 6 Pages 2651-2661
Keywords
Abstract The integrated kinetic energy (IKE) of a tropical cyclone (TC), a volume integration of the surface winds around the centre of the TC, is computed from a comprehensive surface wind (National Aeronautics and Space Administrationís (NASA) cross‐calibrated multi‐platform [CCMP]) analysis available over the global oceans to verify against IKE from wind radii estimates of extended best‐track data maintained by NOAA for the North Atlantic TCs. It is shown that CCMP surface wind analysis severely underestimates IKE largely from not resolving hurricane force winds for majority of the Atlantic TCs, under sampling short‐lived and small‐sized TCs. The seasonal cycle of the North Atlantic TC IKE also verifies poorly in the CCMP analysis. In this article we introduce proxy IKE (PIKE) based on the kinetic energy of the winds at the radius of the last closed isobar (ROCI), which shows promise for a wide range of TC sizes including the smaller‐sized TCs unresolved in the CCMP data set.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 551
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Author (up) Kipkogei, O.; Bhardwaj, A.; Kumar, V.; Ogallo, L.A.; Opijah, F.J.; Mutemi, J.N.; Krishnamurti, T.N.
Title Improving multimodel medium range forecasts over the Greater Horn of Africa using the FSU superensemble Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics Abbreviated Journal Meteorol Atmos Phys
Volume 128 Issue 4 Pages 441-451
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Abstract
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0177-7971 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 82
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Author (up) Krishnamurti, T.N.; Dubey, S.; Kumar, V.; Deepa, R.; Bhardwaj, A.
Title Scale interaction during an extreme rain event over southeast India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc
Volume 143 Issue 704 Pages 1442-1458
Keywords scale interaction; extreme rain; southeast India
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-9009 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 65
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Author (up) Krishnamurti, T.N.; Kumar, V.; Simon, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ghosh, T.; Ross, R.
Title A review of multimodel superensemble forecasting for weather, seasonal climate, and hurricanes Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Reviews of Geophysics Abbreviated Journal Rev. Geophys.
Volume 54 Issue 2 Pages 336-377
Keywords multimodel; superensemble; ensemble mean
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 8755-1209 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 83
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Author (up) Krishnamurti, T.N.; Kumar, V.; Simon, A.; Thomas, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Das, S.; Senroy, S.; Roy Bhowmik, S.K.
Title March of buoyancy elements during extreme rainfall over India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 48 Issue 5-6 Pages 1931-1951
Keywords Monsoon; Mesoscale; Buoyancy
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 84
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Author (up) Kumar, V.; Jana, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Deepa, R.; Sahu, S.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Sirdas, S.A.
Title Greenhouse Gas Emission, Rainfall and Crop Production Over North-Western India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication The Open Ecology Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 47-61
Keywords
Abstract Background: This study is based on datasets acquired from multi sources e.g. rain-gauges, satellite, reanalysis and coupled model for the region of Northwestern India. The influence of rainfall on crop production is obvious and direct. With the climate change and global warming, greenhouse gases are also showing an adverse impact on crop production. Greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2, NO2 and CH4) have shown an increasing trend over Northwestern Indian region. In recent years, rainfall has also shown an increasing trend over Northwestern India, while the production of rice and maize are reducing over the region. From eight selected sites, over Northwestern India, where rice and maize productions have reduced by 40%, with an increase in CO2, NO2 and CH4 gas emission by 5% from 1998 to 2011. Results: The correlation from one year to another between rainfall, gas emission and crop production was not very robust throughout the study period, but seemed to be stronger for some years than others. Conclusion: Such trends and crop yield are attributed to rainfall, greenhouse gas emissions and to the climate variability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1874-2130 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1024
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Author (up) Kumar, V.; Jana, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Deepa, R.; Sahu, S.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Sirdas, S.A.
Title Greenhouse Gas Emission, Rainfall and Crop Production Over North-Western India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication The Open Ecology Journal Abbreviated Journal TOECOLJ
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 47-61
Keywords Greenhouse gases, CH4, Climate Variability, Emissions, Crop production, Rainfall.
Abstract Background:

This study is based on datasets acquired from multi sources e.g. rain-gauges, satellite, reanalysis and coupled model for the region of Northwestern India. The influence of rainfall on crop production is obvious and direct. With the climate change and global warming, greenhouse gases are also showing an adverse impact on crop production. Greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2, NO2 and CH4) have shown an increasing trend over Northwestern Indian region. In recent years, rainfall has also shown an increasing trend over Northwestern India, while the production of rice and maize are reducing over the region. From eight selected sites, over Northwestern India, where rice and maize productions have reduced by 40%, with an increase in CO2, NO2 and CH4 gas emission by 5% from 1998 to 2011.

Results:

The correlation from one year to another between rainfall, gas emission and crop production was not very robust throughout the study period, but seemed to be stronger for some years than others.

Conclusion:

Such trends and crop yield are attributed to rainfall, greenhouse gas emissions and to the climate variability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1874-2130 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1017
Permanent link to this record

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