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Author Bourassa, M.A.; Gille, S.T.; Bitz, C.; Carlson, D.; Cerovecki, I.; Clayson, C.A.; Cronin, M.F.; Drennan, W.M.; Fairall, C.W.; Hoffman, R.N.; Magnusdottir, G.; Pinker, R.T.; Renfrew, I.A.; Serreze, M.; Speer, K.; Talley, L.D.; Wick, G.A.
Title High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2013 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 94 Issue 3 Pages 403-423
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ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
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Funding NASA, NOAA, USCLIVAR Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 208
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Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M.
Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459
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ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 371
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Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M.
Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459
Keywords GEOPHYSICAL DATA; marine surface winds; energy and water cycles
Abstract Are there important differences between reanalysis data and familiar observations and measurements? If so, what are they? This essay evaluates four possible answers that relate to: the role of inference, reliance on forecasts, the need to solve an ill-posed inverse problem, and understanding of errors and uncertainties. The last of these is argued to be most significant. The importance of characterizing uncertainties associated with results—whether those results are observations or measurements, analyses or reanalyses, or forecasts—is emphasized.
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ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 990
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Author Wentz, F.J.; Ricciardulli, L.; Rodriguez, E.; Stiles, B.W.; Bourassa, M.A.; Long, D.G.; Hoffman, R.N.; Stoffelen, A.; Verhoef, A.; O'Neill, L.W.; Farrar, J.T.; Vandemark, D.; Fore, A.G.; Hristova-Veleva, S.M.; Turk, F.J.; Gaston, R.; Tyler, D.
Title Evaluating and Extending the Ocean Wind Climate Data Record Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE J Sel Top Appl Earth Obs Remote Sens
Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 2165-2185
Keywords Radar cross section; remote sensing; satellite applications; sea surface; wind
Abstract Satellite microwave sensors, both active scatterometers and passive radiometers, have been systematically measuring near-surface ocean winds for nearly 40 years, establishing an important legacy in studying and monitoring weather and climate variability. As an aid to such activities, the various wind datasets are being intercalibrated and merged into consistent climate data records (CDRs). The ocean wind CDRs (OW-CDRs) are evaluated by comparisons with ocean buoys and intercomparisons among the different satellite sensors and among the different data providers. Extending the OW-CDR into the future requires exploiting all available datasets, such as OSCAT-2 scheduled to launch in July 2016. Three planned methods of calibrating the OSCAT-2 sigmao measurements include 1) direct Ku-band sigmao intercalibration to QuikSCAT and RapidScat; 2) multisensor wind speed intercalibration; and 3) calibration to stable rainforest targets. Unfortunately, RapidScat failed in August 2016 and cannot be used to directly calibrate OSCAT-2. A particular future continuity concern is the absence of scheduled new or continuation radiometer missions capable of measuring wind speed. Specialized model assimilations provide 30-year long high temporal/spatial resolution wind vector grids that composite the satellite wind information from OW-CDRs of multiple satellites viewing the Earth at different local times.
Address Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1939-1404 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding PMID:28824741; PMCID:PMC5562405 Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 68
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