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Author Xu, X.; Chassignet, E.P.; Firing, Y.L.; Donohue, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Antarctic Circumpolar Current transport through Drake Passage: What can we learn from comparing high-resolution model results to observations? Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans  
  Volume 125 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Uncertainty exists in the time‐mean total transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the world�s strongest ocean current. The two most recent observational programs in Drake Passage, DRAKE and cDrake, yielded transports of 141 and 173.3 Sv, respectively. In this paper, we use a realistic 1/12° global ocean simulation to interpret these observational estimates and reconcile their differences. We first show that the modeled ACC transport in the upper 1000 m is in excellent agreement with repeat shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler (SADCP) transects and that the exponentially decaying transport profile in the model is consistent with the profile derived from repeat hydrographic data. By further comparing the model results to the cDrake and DRAKE observations, we argue that the modeled 157.3 Sv transport, i.e. approximately the average of the cDrake and DRAKE estimates, is actually representative of the time‐mean ACC transport through the Drake Passage. The cDrake experiment overestimated the barotropic contribution in part because the array undersampled the deep recirculation southwest of the Shackleton Fracture Zone, whereas the surface geostrophic currents used in the DRAKE estimate yielded a weaker near‐surface transport than implied by the SADCP data. We also find that the modeled baroclinic and barotropic transports are not correlated, thus monitoring either baroclinic or barotropic transport alone may be insufficient to assess the temporal variability of the total ACC transport.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1107  
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Author Zhao, X.; Zhou, C.; Xu, X.; Ye, R.; Tian, J.; Zhao, W. url  openurl
  Title Deep Circulation in the South China Sea Simulated in a Regional Model Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Ocean Sci. Discuss Abbreviated Journal Ocean Sci. Discuss  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Sea Marine, Oceanography/CIMST, PacificOcean, continuous current-meter, deep circulation, deep western boundary  
  Abstract The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal sea in the northwest Pacific Ocean. In this study, deep circulation in the SCS is investigated using results from eddy-resolving, regional simulations using the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) verified by continuous current-meter observations. Analysis of these results provides a detailed spatial structure and temporal variability of the deep circulation in the SCS. The major features of the SCS deep circulation are a basin-scale cyclonic gyre and a concentrated deep western boundary current (DWBC). Transport of the DWBC is ∼ 2 Sv at 16.5° N with a width of ∼53 km. Flowing southwestward, the narrow DWBC becomes weaker with a wider range. The model results reveal the existence of 80- to 120-day oscillation in the deep northeastern circulation and the DWBC, which are also the areas with elevated eddy kinetic energy. This intraseasonal oscillation propagates northwestward with a velocity amplitude of ∼ 1.0 to 1.5 cm s-1. The distribution of mixing parameters in the deep SCS plays a role in both spatial structure and volume transport of the deep circulation. Compared with the northern shelf of the SCS with the Luzon Strait, deep circulation in the SCS is more sensitive to the large vertical mixing parameters of the Zhongsha Island Chain area.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1013  
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Author Ajayi, A.; Le Sommer, J.; Chassignet, E.; Molines, J.-M.; Xu, X.; Albert, A.; Cosme, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatial and Temporal Variability of the North Atlantic Eddy Field From Two Kilometric-Resolution Ocean Models Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans  
  Volume 125 Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords submesoscales; fine‐ scales; enstrophy; eddies; SWOT  
  Abstract Ocean circulation is dominated by turbulent geostrophic eddy fields with typical scales ranging from 10 to 300 km. At mesoscales (>50 km), the size of eddy structures varies regionally following the Rossby radius of deformation. The variability of the scale of smaller eddies is not well known due to the limitations in existing numerical simulations and satellite capability. Nevertheless, it is well established that oceanic flows (<50 km) generally exhibit strong seasonality. In this study, we present a basin&#8208;scale analysis of coherent structures down to 10&#8201;km in the North Atlantic Ocean using two submesoscale&#8208;permitting ocean models, a NEMO&#8208;based North Atlantic simulation with a horizontal resolution of 1/60 (NATL60) and an HYCOM&#8208;based Atlantic simulation with a horizontal resolution of 1/50 (HYCOM50). We investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the scale of eddy structures with a particular focus on eddies with scales of 10 to 100&#8201;km, and examine the impact of the seasonality of submesoscale energy on the seasonality and distribution of coherent structures in the North Atlantic. Our results show an overall good agreement between the two models in terms of surface wave number spectra and seasonal variability. The key findings of the paper are that (i) the mean size of ocean eddies show strong seasonality; (ii) this seasonality is associated with an increased population of submesoscale eddies (10&#65533;50&#8201;km) in winter; and (iii) the net release of available potential energy associated with mixed layer instability is responsible for the emergence of the increased population of submesoscale eddies in wintertime.  
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  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1104  
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Author Hurlburt, HE: Metzger, EJ; Richman, JG; Chassignet, EP; Drillet, Y; Hecht, MW; Le Galloudec, O; Shriver, JF; Xu, X; Zamudio, L url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dynamical Evaluation of Ocean Models Using the Gulf Stream as an Example Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
  Year 2011 Publication Operational Oceanography in the 21st Century Abbreviated Journal  
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  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Dordrecht Editor Schiller A., Brassington G.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 321  
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Author Zou, S.; Lozier, M.S.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Latitudinal Structure of the Meridional Overturning Circulation Variability on Interannual to Decadal Time Scales in the North Atlantic Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate  
  Volume 33 Issue 9 Pages 3845-3862  
  Keywords Deep convection; Ocean circulation; Thermocline circulation  
  Abstract The latitudinal structure of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the North Atlantic is investigated using numerical results from three ocean circulation simulations over the past four to five decades. We show that AMOC variability south of the Labrador Sea (53°N) to 25°N can be decomposed into a latitudinally coherent component and a gyre-opposing component. The latitudinally coherent component contains both decadal and interannual variabilities. The coherent decadal AMOC variability originates in the subpolar region and is reflected by the zonal density gradient in that basin. It is further shown to be linked to persistent North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) conditions in all three models. The interannual AMOC variability contained in the latitudinally coherent component is shown to be driven by westerlies in the transition region between the subpolar and the subtropical gyre (40°50°N), through significant responses in Ekman transport. Finally, the gyre-opposing component principally varies on interannual time scales and responds to local wind variability related to the annual NAO. The contribution of these components to the total AMOC variability is latitude-dependent: 1) in the subpolar region, all models show that the latitudinally coherent component dominates AMOC variability on interannual to decadal time scales, with little contribution from the gyre-opposing component, and 2) in the subtropical region, the gyre-opposing component explains a majority of the interannual AMOC variability in two models, while in the other model, the contributions from the coherent and the gyre-opposing components are comparable. These results provide a quantitative decomposition of AMOC variability across latitudes and shed light on the linkage between different AMOC variability components and atmospheric forcing mechanisms.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1106  
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Author LaCasce, J.H.; Escartin, J.; Chassignet, E.P.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Jet instability over smooth, corrugated and realistic bathymetry Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.  
  Volume Issue Pages  
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  Abstract The stability of a horizontally- and vertically-sheared surface jet is examined, with a focus on the vertical structure of the resultant eddies. Over a flat bottom, the instability is mixed baroclinic/barotropic, producing strong eddies at depth which are characteristically shifted downstream relative to the surface eddies. Baroclinic instability is suppressed over a large slope for retrograde jets (with a flow anti-parallel to topographic wave propagation), and to a lesser extent for prograde jets (with flow parallel to topographic wave propagation), as seen previously. In such cases, barotropic (lateral) instability dominates if the jet is sufficiently narrow. This yields surface eddies whose size is independent of the slope but proportional to the jet width. Deep eddies still form, forced by interfacial motion associated with the surface eddies, but they are weaker than under baroclinic instability and are vertically aligned with the surface eddies. A sinusoidal ridge acts similarly, suppressing baroclinic instability and favoring lateral instability in the upper layer.

A ridge with a 1 km wavelength and an amplitude of roughly 10 m is sufficient to suppress baroclinic instability. Surveys of bottom roughness from bathymetry acquired with shipboard multibeam echosounding reveal that such heights are common, beneath the Kuroshio, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and, to a lesser extent, the Gulf Stream. Consistent with this, vorticity and velocity cross sections from a 1/50° HYCOM simulation suggest that Gulf Stream eddies are vertically aligned, as in the linear stability calculations with strong topography. Thus lateral instability may be more common than previously thought, due to topography hindering vertical energy transfer.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 998  
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Author Xu, X.; Chassignet, E.P., Wang, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation transports in coupled CMIP5 simulations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn.  
  Volume 51 Issue 11 Pages 6511-6531  
  Keywords NAO-AMOC; CMIP5; NAO index; AMOC index; meridional pressure gradient; magnitude; structure change of the NAO.  
  Abstract The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) plays a fundamental role in the climate system, and long-term climate simulations are used to understand the AMOC variability and to assess its impact. This study examines the basic characteristics of the AMOC variability in 44 CMIP5 (Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project) simulations, using the 18 atmospherically-forced CORE-II (Phase 2 of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment) simulations as a reference. The analysis shows that on interannual and decadal timescales, the AMOC variability in the CMIP5 exhibits a similar magnitude and meridional coherence as in the CORE-II simulations, indicating that the modeled atmospheric variability responsible for AMOC variability in the CMIP5 is in reasonable agreement with the CORE-II forcing. On multidecadal timescales, however, the AMOC variability is weaker by a factor of more than 2 and meridionally less coherent in the CMIP5 than in the CORE-II simulations. The CMIP5 simulations also exhibit a weaker long-term atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). However, one cannot fully attribute the weaker AMOC variability to the weaker variability in NAO because, unlike the CORE-II simulations, the CMIP5 simulations do not exhibit a robust NAO-AMOC linkage. While the variability of the wintertime heat flux and mixed layer depth in the western subpolar North Atlantic is strongly linked to the AMOC variability, the NAO variability is not.  
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  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 981  
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Author Xu, X.; Bower, A.; Furey, H.; Chassignet, E.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Variability of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water Transport Through the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone: Results From an Eddying Simulation and Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans  
  Volume Issue 8 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observations show that the westward transport of the Iceland&#8208;Scotland overflow water (ISOW) through the Charlie&#8208;Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) is highly variable. This study examines (a) where this variability comes from and (b) how it is related to the variability of ISOW transport at upstream locations in the Iceland Basin and other ISOW flow pathways. The analyses are based on a 35&#8208;year 1/12° eddying Atlantic simulation that represents well the main features of the observed ISOW in the area of interest, in particular, the transport variability through the CGFZ. The results show that (a) the variability of the ISOW transport is closely correlated with that of the barotropic transports in the CGFZ associated with the meridional displacement of the North Atlantic Current front and is possibly induced by fluctuations of large&#8208;scale zonal wind stress in the Western European Basin east of the CGFZ; (b) the variability of the ISOW transport is increased by a factor of 3 from the northern part of the Iceland Basin to the CGFZ region and transport time series at these two locations are not correlated, further suggesting that the variability at the CGFZ does not come from the upstream source; and (c) the variability of the ISOW transport at the CGFZ is strongly anticorrelated to that of the southward ISOW transport along the eastern flank of the Mid&#8208;Atlantic Ridge, suggesting an out&#8208;of&#8208;phase covarying transport between these two ISOW pathways.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1023  
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Author Roberts, M.J.; Jackson, L.C.; Roberts, C.D.; Meccia, V.; Docquier, D.; Koenigk, T.; Ortega, P.; Moreno&#8208; Chamarro, E.; Bellucci, A.; Coward, A.; Drijfhout, S.; Exarchou, E.; Gutjahr, O.; Hewitt, H.; Iovino, D.; Lohmann, K.; Putrasahan, D.; Schiemann, R.; Seddon, J.; Terray, L.; Xu, X.; Zhang, Q.; Chang, P.; Yeager, S.G.; Castruccio, F.S.; Zhang. C.; Wu, L. url  openurl
  Title Sensitivity of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to Model Resolution in CMIP6 HighResMIP Simulations and Implications for Future Changes Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems Abbreviated Journal J. Adv. Model. Earth Syst.  
  Volume Issue Pages Accepted  
  Keywords  
  Abstract A multi&#8208;model, multi&#8208;resolution ensemble using CMIP6 HighResMIP coupled experiments is used to assess the performance of key aspects of the North Atlantic circulation. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and related heat transport, tends to become stronger as ocean model resolution is enhanced, better agreeing with observations at 26.5°N. However for most models the circulation remains too shallow compared to observations, and has a smaller temperature contrast between the northward and southward limbs of the AMOC. These biases cause the northward heat transport to be systematically too low for a given overturning strength. The higher resolution models also tend to have too much deep mixing in the subpolar gyre.

In the period 2015&#8208;2050 the overturning circulation tends to decline more rapidly in the higher resolution models, which is related to both the mean state and to the subpolar gyre contribution to deep water formation. The main part of the decline comes from the Florida Current component of the circulation. Such large declines in AMOC are not seen in the models with resolutions more typically used for climate studies, suggesting an enhanced risk for Northern Hemisphere climate change. However, only a small number of different ocean models are included in the study.
 
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1109  
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Author Zhao, X.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, W.; Tian, J.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Deepwater overflow observed by three bottom-anchored moorings in the Bashi Channel Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2016 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 110 Issue Pages 65-74  
  Keywords Deepwater overflow; Bashi Channel; Volume transport; Spatial structure; Temporal variability  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 92  
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