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Author Zhao, X.; Zhou, C.; Xu, X.; Ye, R.; Tian, J.; Zhao, W. url  openurl
  Title Deep Circulation in the South China Sea Simulated in a Regional Model Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Ocean Sci. Discuss Abbreviated Journal Ocean Sci. Discuss  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Sea Marine, Oceanography/CIMST, PacificOcean, continuous current-meter, deep circulation, deep western boundary  
  Abstract The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal sea in the northwest Pacific Ocean. In this study, deep circulation in the SCS is investigated using results from eddy-resolving, regional simulations using the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) verified by continuous current-meter observations. Analysis of these results provides a detailed spatial structure and temporal variability of the deep circulation in the SCS. The major features of the SCS deep circulation are a basin-scale cyclonic gyre and a concentrated deep western boundary current (DWBC). Transport of the DWBC is ∼ 2 Sv at 16.5° N with a width of ∼53 km. Flowing southwestward, the narrow DWBC becomes weaker with a wider range. The model results reveal the existence of 80- to 120-day oscillation in the deep northeastern circulation and the DWBC, which are also the areas with elevated eddy kinetic energy. This intraseasonal oscillation propagates northwestward with a velocity amplitude of ∼ 1.0 to 1.5 cm s-1. The distribution of mixing parameters in the deep SCS plays a role in both spatial structure and volume transport of the deep circulation. Compared with the northern shelf of the SCS with the Luzon Strait, deep circulation in the SCS is more sensitive to the large vertical mixing parameters of the Zhongsha Island Chain area.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1013  
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Author Bhardwaj, A.; Misra, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring the Indian Summer Monsoon Evolution at the Granularity of the Indian Meteorological Sub-divisions using Remotely Sensed Rainfall Products Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 11 Issue 9 Pages 1080  
  Keywords Indian Summer Monsoon; GPM; TRMM satellite precipitation; meteorological sub-divisions  
  Abstract We make use of satellite-based rainfall products from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to objectively define local onset and demise of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) at the spatial resolution of the meteorological subdivisions defined by the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). These meteorological sub-divisions are the operational spatial scales for official forecasts issued by the IMD. Therefore, there is a direct practical utility to target these spatial scales for monitoring the evolution of the ISM. We find that the diagnosis of the climatological onset and demise dates and its variations from the TMPA product is quite similar to the rain gauge based analysis of the IMD, despite the differences in the duration of the two datasets. This study shows that the onset date variations of the ISM have a significant impact on the variations of the seasonal length and seasonal rainfall anomalies in many of the meteorological sub-divisions: for example, the early or later onset of the ISM is associated with longer and wetter or shorter and drier ISM seasons, respectively. It is shown that TMPA dataset (and therefore its follow up Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG)) could be usefully adopted for monitoring the onset of the ISM and therefore extend its use to anticipate the potential anomalies of the seasonal length and seasonal rainfall anomalies of the ISM in many of the Indian meteorological sub-divisions. View Full-Text  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1026  
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Author Zou, M.; Xiong, X.; Wu, Z.; Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Increase of Atmospheric Methane Observed from Space-Borne and Ground-Based Measurements Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages  
  Keywords Methane increase trend; Boundary layer; Mid-upper troposphere; Satellite; AIRS  
  Abstract It has been found that the concentration of atmospheric methane (CH4) has rapidly increased since 2007 after a decade of nearly constant concentration in the atmosphere. As an important greenhouse gas, such an increase could enhance the threat of global warming. To better quantify this increasing trend, a novel statistic method, i.e. the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method, was used to analyze the CH4 trends from three different measurements: the mid-upper tropospheric CH4 (MUT) from the space-borne measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the CH4 in the marine boundary layer (MBL) from NOAA ground-based in-situ measurements, and the column-averaged CH4 in the atmosphere (X-CH4) from the ground-based up-looking Fourier Transform Spectrometers at Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Comparison of the CH4 trends in the mid-upper troposphere, lower troposphere, and the column average from these three data sets shows that, overall, these trends agree well in capturing the abrupt CH4 increase in 2007 (the first peak) and an even faster increase after 2013 (the second peak) over the globe. The increased rates of CH4 in the MUT, as observed by AIRS, are overall smaller than CH4 in MBL and the column-average CH4. During 2009-2011, there was a dip in the increase rate for CH4 in MBL, and the MUT-CH4 increase rate was almost negligible in the mid-high latitude regions. The increase of the column-average CH4 also reached the minimum during 2009-2011 accordingly, suggesting that the trends of CH4 are not only impacted by the surface emission, however that they also may be impacted by other processes like transport and chemical reaction loss associated with [OH]. One advantage of the EEMD analysis is to derive the monthly rate and the results show that the frequency of the variability of CH4 increase rates in the mid-high northern latitude regions is larger than those in the tropics and southern hemisphere.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1055  
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Author Huang, T.; Armstrong, E.M.; Bourassa, M.A.; Cram, T.A.; Elya, J.; Greguska, F.; Jacob, J.C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; Quach, N.T.; McGibbney, L.J.; Smith, S.R.; Wilson, B.D.; Worley S.J.; Yang, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Integrated Data Analytics Platform Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords big data, Cloud computing, Ocean science, data analysis, Matchup, anomaly detection, open source  
  Abstract An Integrated Science Data Analytics Platform is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a NASA technology integration project to establish a cloud-based Integrated Ocean Science Data Analytics Platform for big ocean science at NASA�s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) for big ocean science. It focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, in situ to satellite data matchup, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery.

Our communities are relying on data available through distributed data centers to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20PB of observational data during its 3-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing Earth Science data archival, distribution and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.
 
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1038  
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Author Fender, C.K.; Kelly, T.B.; Guidi, L.; Ohman, M.D.; Smith, M.C.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Investigating Particle Size-Flux Relationships and the Biological Pump Across a Range of Plankton Ecosystem States From Coastal to Oligotrophic Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1074  
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Author Lee, C.M.; Starkweather, S.; Eicken, H.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Wilkinson, J.; Sandven, S.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Gerland, S.; Grebmeier, J.; Intrieri, J.M.; Kang, S.-H.; McCammon, M.; Nguyen, A.T.; Polyakov, I.; Rabe, B.; Sagen, H.; Seeyave, S.; Volkov, D.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Chafik, L.; Dzieciuch, M.; Goni, G.; Hamre, T.; King, A.L.; Olsen, A.; Raj, R.P.; Rossby, T.; Skagseth, Ø.; Søiland, H.; Sørensen, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Framework for the Development, Design and Implementation of a Sustained Arctic Ocean Observing System Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1044  
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Author Davidson, F.; Alvera-Azcárate, A.; Barth, A.; Brassington, G.B.; Chassignet, E.P.; Clementi, E.; De Mey-Frémaux, P.; Divakaran, P.; Harris, C.; Hernandez, F.; Hogan, P.; Hole, L.R.; Holt, J.; Liu, G.; Lu, Y.; Lorente, P.; Maksymczuk, J.; Martin, M.; Mehra, A.; Melsom, A.; Mo, H.; Moore, A.; Oddo, P.; Pascual, A.; Pequignet, A.-C.; Kourafalou, V.; Ryan, A.; Siddorn, J.; Smith, G.; Spindler, D.; Spindler, T.; Stanev, E.V.; Staneva, J.; Storto, A.; Tanajura, C.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Wan, L.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Synergies in Operational Oceanography: The Intrinsic Need for Sustained Ocean Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
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  Abstract Operational oceanography can be described as the provision of routine oceanographic information needed for decision-making purposes. It is dependent upon sustained research and development through the end-to-end framework of an operational service, from observation collection to delivery mechanisms. The core components of operational oceanographic systems are a multi-platform observation network, a data management system, a data assimilative prediction system, and a dissemination/accessibility system. These are interdependent, necessitating communication and exchange between them, and together provide the mechanism through which a clear picture of ocean conditions, in the past, present, and future, can be seen. Ocean observations play a critical role in all aspects of operational oceanography, not only for assimilation but as part of the research cycle, and for verification and validation of products. Data assimilative prediction systems are advancing at a fast pace, in tandem with improved science and the growth in computing power. To make best use of the system capability these advances would be matched by equivalent advances in operational observation coverage. This synergy between the prediction and observation systems underpins the quality of products available to stakeholders, and justifies the need for sustained ocean observations. In this white paper, the components of an operational oceanographic system are described, highlighting the critical role of ocean observations, and how the operational systems will evolve over the next decade to improve the characterization of ocean conditions, including at finer spatial and temporal scales.  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1083  
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Author Domingues, R.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; Chardon-Maldonado, P.; Todd, R.E.; Halliwell, G.; Kim, H.-S.; Lin, I.-I.; Sato, K.; Narazaki, T.; Shay, L.K.; Miles, T.; Glenn, S.; Zhang, J.A.; Jayne, S.R.; Centurioni, L.; Le Hénaff, M.; Foltz, G.R.; Bringas, F.; Ali, M.M.; DiMarco, S.F.; Hosoda, S.; Fukuoka, T.; LaCour, B.; Mehra, A.; Sanabia, E.R.; Gyakum, J.R.; Dong, J.; Knaff, J.A.; Goni, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ocean Observations in Support of Studies and Forecasts of Tropical and Extratropical Cyclones Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 446  
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  Abstract Over the past decade, measurements from the climate-oriented ocean observing system have been key to advancing the understanding of extreme weather events that originate and intensify over the ocean, such as tropical cyclones (TCs) and extratropical bomb cyclones (ECs). In order to foster further advancements to predict and better understand these extreme weather events, a need for a dedicated observing system component specifically to support studies and forecasts of TCs and ECs has been identified, but such a system has not yet been implemented. New technologies, pilot networks, targeted deployments of instruments, and state-of-the art coupled numerical models have enabled advances in research and forecast capabilities and illustrate a potential framework for future development. Here, applications and key results made possible by the different ocean observing efforts in support of studies and forecasts of TCs and ECs, as well as recent advances in observing technologies and strategies are reviewed. Then a vision and specific recommendations for the next decade are discussed.  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1043  
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Author Kent, E.C.; Rayner, N.A.; Berry, D.I.; Eastman, R.; Grigorieva, V.G.; Huang, B.; Kennedy, J.J.; Smith, S.R.; Willett, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Observing Requirements for Long-Term Climate Records at the Ocean Surface Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 441  
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  Abstract Observations of conditions at the ocean surface have been made for centuries, contributing to some of the longest instrumental records of climate change. Most prominent is the climate data record (CDR) of sea surface temperature (SST), which is itself essential to the majority of activities in climate science and climate service provision. A much wider range of surface marine observations is available however, providing a rich source of data on past climate. We present a general error model describing the characteristics of observations used for the construction of climate records, illustrating the importance of multi-variate records with rich metadata for reducing uncertainty in CDRs. We describe the data and metadata requirements for the construction of stable, multi-century marine CDRs for variables important for describing the changing climate: SST, mean sea level pressure, air temperature, humidity, winds, clouds, and waves. Available sources of surface marine data are reviewed in the context of the error model. We outline the need for a range of complementary observations, including very high quality observations at a limited number of locations and also observations that sample more broadly but with greater uncertainty. We describe how high-resolution modern records, particularly those of high-quality, can help to improve the quality of observations throughout the historical record. We recommend the extension of internationally-coordinated data management and curation to observation types that do not have a primary focus of the construction of climate records. Also recommended is reprocessing the existing surface marine climate archive to improve and quantify data and metadata quality and homogeneity. We also recommend the expansion of observations from research vessels and high quality moorings, routine observations from ships and from data and metadata rescue. Other priorities include: field evaluation of sensors; resources for the process of establishing user requirements and determining whether requirements are being met; and research to estimate uncertainty, quantify biases and to improve methods of construction of CDRs. The requirements developed in this paper encompass specific actions involving a variety of stakeholders, including funding agencies, scientists, data managers, observing network operators, satellite agencies, and international co-ordination bodies.  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1040  
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Author Rodríguez, E.; Bourassa, M.; Chelton, D.; Farrar, J.T.; Long, D.; Perkovic-Martin, D.; Samelson, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Winds and Currents Mission Concept Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
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  Abstract The Winds and Currents Mission (WaCM) is a proposed approach to meet the need identified by the NRC Decadal Survey for the simultaneous measurements of ocean vector winds and currents. WaCM features a Ka-band pencil-beam Doppler scatterometer able to map ocean winds and currents globally. We review the principles behind the WaCM measurement and the requirements driving the mission. We then present an overview of the WaCM observatory and tie its capabilities to other OceanObs reviews and measurement approaches.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1063  
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