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Author Kelly, T.B.; Davison, P.C.; Goericke, R.; Landry, M.R.; Ohman, M.D.; Stukel, M,R. doi  openurl
  Title The Importance of Mesozooplankton Diel Vertical Migration for Sustaining a Mesopelagic Food Web Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication FRONTIERS IN MARINE SCIENCE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We used extensive ecological and biogeochemical measurements obtained from quasi-Lagrangian experiments during two California Current Ecosystem Long-Term Ecosystem Research cruises to analyze carbon fluxes between the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones using a linear inverse ecosystem model (LIEM). Measurement constraints on the model include C-14 primary productivity, dilution-based microzooplankton grazing rates, gut pigment-based mesozooplankton grazing rates (on multiple zooplankton size classes), Th-234:U-238 disequilibrium and sediment trap measured carbon export, and metabolic requirements of micronekton, zooplankton, and bacteria. A likelihood approach (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) was used to estimate the resulting flow uncertainties from a sample of potential flux networks. Results highlight the importance of mesozooplankton active transport (i.e., diel vertical migration) in supplying the carbon demand of mesopelagic organisms and sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In nine water parcels ranging from a coastal bloom to offshore oligotrophic conditions, mesozooplankton active transport accounted for 18-84% (median: 42%) of the total carbon transfer to the mesopelagic, with gravitational settling of POC (12-55%; median: 37%), and subduction (2-32%; median: 14%) providing the majority of the remainder. Vertically migrating zooplankton contributed to downward carbon flux through respiration and excretion at depth and via mortality losses to predatory zooplankton and mesopelagic fish (e.g., myctophids and gonostomatids). Sensitivity analyses showed that the results of the LIEM were robust to changes in nekton metabolic demand, rates of bacterial production, and mesozooplankton gross growth efficiency. This analysis suggests that prior estimates of zooplankton active transport based on conservative estimates of standard (rather than active) metabolism are likely too low.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1084  
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Author Proshutinsky, A.; Krishfield, R.; Toole, J.M.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W.; Zimmermann, S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Armitage, T.W.K.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Golubeva, E.; Manucharyan, G.E.; Platov, G.; Watanabe, E.; Kikuchi, T.; Nishino, S.; Itoh, M.; Kang, S.-H.; Cho, K.-H.; Tateyama, K.; Zhao, J. doi  openurl
  Title Analysis of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Content in 2003-2018 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Geophys Res Oceans  
  Volume 124 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Gyre; circulation; climate change; freshwater balance; modeling  
  Abstract Hydrographic data collected from research cruises, bottom-anchored moorings, drifting Ice-Tethered Profilers, and satellite altimetry in the Beaufort Gyre region of the Arctic Ocean document an increase of more than 6,400 km(3) of liquid freshwater content from 2003 to 2018: a 40% growth relative to the climatology of the 1970s. This fresh water accumulation is shown to result from persistent anticyclonic atmospheric wind forcing (1997-2018) accompanied by sea ice melt, a wind-forced redirection of Mackenzie River discharge from predominantly eastward to westward flow, and a contribution of low salinity waters of Pacific Ocean origin via Bering Strait. Despite significant uncertainties in the different observations, this study has demonstrated the synergistic value of having multiple diverse datasets to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Beaufort Gyre freshwater content variability. For example, Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) surveys clearly show the interannual increase in freshwater content, but without satellite or Ice-Tethered Profiler measurements, it is not possible to resolve the seasonal cycle of freshwater content, which in fact is larger than the year-to-year variability, or the more subtle interannual variations.  
  Address Physical Oceanography Laboratory Ocean University of China, Qingdao China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('2055432'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC7003849') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1097  
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Author Proshutinsky, A.; Krishfield, R.; Toole, J.M.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W.; Zimmermann, S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Armitage, T.W.K.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Golubeva, E.; Manucharyan, G.E.; Platov, G.; Watanabe, E.; Kikuchi, T.; Nishino, S.; Itoh, M.; Kang, S.-H.; Cho, K.-H.; Tateyama, K.; Zhao, J. doi  openurl
  Title Analysis of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Content in 2003-2018 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Geophys Res Oceans  
  Volume 124 Issue 12 Pages 9658-9689  
  Keywords Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Gyre; circulation; climate change; freshwater balance; modeling  
  Abstract Hydrographic data collected from research cruises, bottom-anchored moorings, drifting Ice-Tethered Profilers, and satellite altimetry in the Beaufort Gyre region of the Arctic Ocean document an increase of more than 6,400 km(3) of liquid freshwater content from 2003 to 2018: a 40% growth relative to the climatology of the 1970s. This fresh water accumulation is shown to result from persistent anticyclonic atmospheric wind forcing (1997-2018) accompanied by sea ice melt, a wind-forced redirection of Mackenzie River discharge from predominantly eastward to westward flow, and a contribution of low salinity waters of Pacific Ocean origin via Bering Strait. Despite significant uncertainties in the different observations, this study has demonstrated the synergistic value of having multiple diverse datasets to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Beaufort Gyre freshwater content variability. For example, Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) surveys clearly show the interannual increase in freshwater content, but without satellite or Ice-Tethered Profiler measurements, it is not possible to resolve the seasonal cycle of freshwater content, which in fact is larger than the year-to-year variability, or the more subtle interannual variations.  
  Address Physical Oceanography Laboratory Ocean University of China, Qingdao China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('2055432'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC7003849') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1102  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, M.; Huang, N.E.; Wang, S.; Qiao, F. doi  openurl
  Title Data concerning statistical relation between obliquity and Dansgaard-Oeschger events Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal Data Brief  
  Volume 23 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Dansgaard-Oeschger events; Obliquity; Surrogate data; Time-varying Shannon entropy  
  Abstract Data presented are related to the research article entitled “Using Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis to quantify the modulation of Dansgaard-Oeschger events by obliquity” (J. Deng et al., 2018). The datasets in Deng et al. (2018) are analyzed on the foundation of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) (Z.H. Wu and N.E. Huang, 2009), and reveal more occurrences of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events in the decreasing phase of obliquity. Here, we report the number of significant high Shannon entropy (SE) (C.E. Shannon and W. Weaver, 1949) of 95% significance level of DO events in the increasing and decreasing phases of obliquity, respectively. First, the proxy time series are filtered by EEMD to obtain DO events. Then, the time-varying SE of DO modes are calculated on the basis of principle of histogram. The 95% significance level is evaluated through surrogate data (T. Schreiber and A. Schmitz, 1996). Finally, a comparison between the numbers of SE values that are larger than 95% significance level in the increasing and decreasing phases of obliquity, respectively, is reported.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Marine Sciences and Numerical Modelling, Ministry of Natural Resources, Qingdao 266061, PR China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-3409 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('1372394'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC6660458') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1068  
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Author O'hara, S. H.; Arko, R. A.; Clark, D.; Chandler, C. L.; Elya, J. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; McLain, K.; Olson, C. J.; Sellers, C. J.; Smith, S. R.; Stocks, K. I.; Stolp, L.; Carbotte, S. M. openurl 
  Title Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program Data Services for the Oceanographic Research Community Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 4299 General or miscellaneous, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL  
  Abstract Research vessels supported by NSF are critical platforms contributing to academic oceanographic research in the US. The “underway” data sets obtained from the continuously operating geophysical, water column, and meteorological sensors aboard these vessels provide characterization of basic environmental conditions for the oceans and are of high scientific value for building global syntheses, climatologies, and historical time series of ocean properties (e.g the World Ocean Atlas, the GMRT bathymetric synthesis, ICOADS). The Rolling deck to Repository program (www.rvdata.us) provides a central shore-side data gateway that ensures the basic documentation, assessment and submission of all environmental data from ship operators to the NOAA long-term archives for these data.

R2R provides a set of data services for the oceanographic research community, including: publishing an online, searchable and browsable master cruise catalog, supported by cruise and data set DOIs; organizing, archiving, and disseminating original underway data and documents; assessing data quality on select data types; creating select post-field data products; and supporting at-sea event logging.

In this presentation we will discuss new developments in R2R data services and challenges associated with ship-based data management. A significant challenge is the dramatic increase in data volumes associated with new sensors (e.g. the EK80 Sonar systems) whereby individual cruise distributions can be several terabytes. Ship operators, R2R and NCEI must design a way to move and store these growing volumes. R2R is also working to make information more accessible and complete. A new website has been launched along with API web services that allow users to find and use data more easily. R2R is working to improve device metadata, including working to identify the time sources for all environmental sensors to support accurate comparison and merging of data sets.
 
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1006  
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Author Groenen, Danielle Elizabeth openurl 
  Title Diagnosing the Atmospheric Phenomena Associated with the Onset and Demise of the Rainy Season in Mesoamerica Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Mexico and Central America (Mesoamerica) are situated in a complex and unique geographical position with the Caribbean Sea to the East and the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean to the West. The weather patterns of this region are driven by winds, temperatures, moisture, and orography of several mountain ranges. This study finds the dates of the onset and demise of rainfall regimes on a specific day using NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall for years 1998–2012, area-averaged over land. Using NASA’s MERRA-2 Reanalysis data, we also look at the phenomenology of the triggers of the rainy season onset and demise on the daily time-scale instead of the monthly scales used by previous studies.

We find that the Mesoamerican Rainy Season can be distinguished into two parts: the Early Spring Rainfall (ESR) associated with light rains and the Late Spring Rainfall (LSR) associated with heavy rains. Two algorithms are used to obtain these rainy season distinctions. A new algorithm was developed during this study, called the SLOPE algorithm, to calculate when the rain rates first start to increase. In the second method, the daily cumulative anomalies of rainfall are compared to the climatological rainfall to find the time of onset of the heavy rains, called the MINCA algorithm. To better understand the phenomenology associated with the timing of the rainfall, we look at the monsoon trough, moisture flux convergence, moist static energy anomalies, and the weakening/strengthening of the winds associated with the Caribbean Low-Level Jet and Panama Jet.

The light rain rates begin, on average, in mid-March, approximately one month after the peak of the winter Caribbean Low-Level Jet and the Panama Jet. The ramp-up between the light rains and heavy rains is associated with a significant weakening of both jets and the northward progression of a monsoon trough off the western coast of Central America. The heavy rain rates begin, on average, in mid-May, and are associated with the timing when the Panama Jet goes to near zero magnitude and a strong monsoon trough in the eastern Pacific. At the demise of the rainfall, approximately in mid-November, the Panama Jet strengthens again, the total moisture flux convergence decreases significantly, and the monsoon trough retreats southward and eastward. The results of this study have positive implications in agriculture and water resources for Mesoamerica, as this information may help resource managers better plan and adapt to climate variability.
 
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1085  
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Author Yu, B.; Seed, A.; Pu, L.; Malone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Integration of weather radar data into a raster GIS framework for improved flood estimation Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Atmospheric Science Letters Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Sci. Lett.  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We present in this paper the interannual variability of seasonal temperature and rainfall in the Indian meteorological subdivisions (IMS) for boreal winter and summer seasons that take in to account the varying length of the seasons.Our study reveals that accounting for the variations in the length of the sea-sons produces stronger teleconnections between the seasonal anomalies of surface temperature and rainfall over India with corresponding sea surface temperature anomalies of the tropical Oceans (especially over the northern Indian and the equatorial Pacific Oceans) compared to the same teleconnections from fixed length seasons over the IMS. It should be noted that the IMS show significant spatial heterogeneity in these teleconnections  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1530-261X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1069  
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Author Maloney, E.D.; Gettelman, A.; Ming, Y.; Neelin, J.D.; Barrie, D.; Mariotti, A.; Chen, C.-C.; Coleman, D.R.B.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Singh, B.; Annamalai, H.; Berg, A.; Booth, J.F.; Camargo, S.J.; Dai, A.; Gonzalez, A.; Hafner, J.; Jiang, X.; Jing, X.; Kim, D.; Kumar, A.; Moon, Y.; Naud, C.M.; Sobel, A.H.; Suzuki, K.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.; Wing, A.A.; Xu, X.; Zhao, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Process-Oriented Evaluation of Climate and Weather Forecasting Models Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 100 Issue 9 Pages 1665-1686  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Realistic climate and weather prediction models are necessary to produce confidence in projections of future climate over many decades and predictions for days to seasons. These models must be physically justified and validated for multiple weather and climate processes. A key opportunity to accelerate model improvement is greater incorporation of process-oriented diagnostics (PODs) into standard packages that can be applied during the model development process, allowing the application of diagnostics to be repeatable across multiple model versions and used as a benchmark for model improvement. A POD characterizes a specific physical process or emergent behavior that is related to the ability to simulate an observed phenomenon. This paper describes the outcomes of activities by the Model Diagnostics Task Force (MDTF) under the NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) Modeling, Analysis, Predictions and Projections (MAPP) program to promote development of PODs and their application to climate and weather prediction models. MDTF and modeling center perspectives on the need for expanded process-oriented diagnosis of models are presented. Multiple PODs developed by the MDTF are summarized, and an open-source software framework developed by the MDTF to aid application of PODs to centers' model development is presented in the context of other relevant community activities. The paper closes by discussing paths forward for the MDTF effort and for community process-oriented diagnosis.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1088  
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Author Liu, Y.; Tan, Z.-M.; Wu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Noninstantaneous Wave-CISK for the Interaction between Convective Heating and Low-Level Moisture Convergence in the Tropics Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Sci.  
  Volume 76 Issue 7 Pages 2083-2101  
  Keywords Convection; Diabatic heating; Moisture; moisture budget  
  Abstract The interaction between tropical convective heating and thermally forced circulation is investigated using a global dry primitive-equation model with the parameterization of wave-conditional instability of the second kind (CISK). It is demonstrated that deep convective heating can hardly sustain itself through the moisture convergence at low levels regardless of the fraction of immediate consumption of converged moisture. In contrast, when the fraction is large, shallow convective heating and its forced circulation exhibit preferred growth of small scales. As the “CISK catastrophe” mainly comes from the instantaneous characters of moisture-convection feedback in the conventional wave-CISK, a noninstantaneous wave-CISK is proposed, which highlights the accumulation-consumption (AC) time scale for the convective heating accumulation and/or the converged moisture consumption. In the new wave-CISK, once moisture is converged, the release of latent heat takes place gradually within an AC time scale. In this sense, convective heating is not only related to the instantaneous moisture convergence at the current time, but also to that which occurred in the past period of the AC time scale. The noninstantaneous wave-CISK could guarantee the occurrence of convective heating and/or moisture convergence at larger scales, and then favor the growth of long waves, and thus solve the problem of CISK catastrophe. With the new wave-CISK and AC time scale of 2 days, the simulated convective heating-driven system bears a large similarity to that of the observed convectively coupled Kelvin wave.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4928 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1065  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Misra, V.; Bhardwaj, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Defining the Northeast Monsoon of India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.  
  Volume 147 Issue 3 Pages 791-807  
  Keywords Indian Summer Monsoon, intraseasonal,Climate models, variability, NEM, rainfall  
  Abstract This study introduces an objective definition for onset and demise of the Northeast Indian Monsoon (NEM). The definition is based on the land surface temperature analysis over the Indian subcontinent. It is diagnosed from the inflection points in the daily anomaly cumulative curve of the area-averaged surface temperature over the provinces of Andhra Pradesh, Rayalseema, and Tamil Nadu located in the southeastern part of India. Per this definition, the climatological onset and demise dates of the NEM season are 6 November and 13 March, respectively. The composite evolution of the seasonal cycle of 850hPa winds, surface wind stress, surface ocean currents, and upper ocean heat content suggest a seasonal shift around the time of the diagnosed onset and demise dates of the NEM season. The interannual variations indicate onset date variations have a larger impact than demise date variations on the seasonal length, seasonal anomalies of rainfall, and surface temperature of the NEM. Furthermore, it is shown that warm El Niño�Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes are associated with excess seasonal rainfall, warm seasonal land surface temperature anomalies, and reduced lengths of the NEM season. Likewise, cold ENSO episodes are likely to be related to seasonal deficit rainfall anomalies, cold land surface temperature anomalies, and increased lengths of the NEM season.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 999  
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