|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P.
Title An information technology foundation for fostering interdisciplinary oceanographic research and analysis Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 1914 Data mining, INFORMATICSDE: 4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICALDE: 4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL
Abstract Before complex analysis of oceanographic or any earth science data can occur, it must be placed in the proper domain of computing and software resources. In the past this was nearly always the scientist's personal computer or institutional computer servers. The problem with this approach is that it is necessary to bring the data products directly to these compute resources leading to large data transfers and storage requirements especially for high volume satellite or model datasets. In this presentation we will present a new technological solution under development and implementation at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for conducting oceanographic and related research based on satellite data and other sources. Fundamentally, our approach for satellite resources is to tile (partition) the data inputs into cloud-optimized and computation friendly databases that allow distributed computing resources to perform on demand and server-side computation and data analytics. This technology, known as NEXUS, has already been implemented in several existing NASA data portals to support oceanographic, sea-level, and gravity data time series analysis with capabilities to output time-average maps, correlation maps, Hovmöller plots, climatological averages and more. A further extension of this technology will integrate ocean in situ observations, event-based data discovery (e.g., natural disasters), data quality screening and additional capabilities. This particular activity is an open source project known as the Apache Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) (https://sdap.apache.org), and colloquially as OceanWorks, and is funded by the NASA AIST program. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources for the researcher allowing them to focus on research results and hypothesis testing, and not be concerned with security, data preparation and management. We will present a few oceanographic and interdisciplinary use cases demonstrating the capabilities for characterizing regional sea-level rise, sea surface temperature anomalies, and ocean hurricane responses.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1004
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Feng, Y.; Wu, Z.; Qiao, F.; Huang, N.E.
Title Intercomparison between observed and simulated variability in global ocean heat content using empirical mode decomposition, part I: modulated annual cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2013 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 41 Issue 11-12 Pages 2797-2815
Keywords Ocean heat content; Modulated annual cycle; Empirical mode decomposition; Instantaneous frequency; Instantaneous amplitude; CMIP3
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 209
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, M.; Huang, N.E.; Wang, S.; Qiao, F.
Title Using Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis to quantify the modulation of Dansgaard-Oeschger events by obliquity Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Quaternary Science Reviews Abbreviated Journal Quaternary Science Reviews
Volume 192 Issue Pages 282-299
Keywords Pleistocene; Paleoclimatology; Greenland; Antarctica; Data treatment; Data analysis; Dansgaard-oeschger (DO) events; Obliquity forcing; Phase preference; Holo-hilbert spectral analysis; Amplitude modulation; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; GREENLAND ICE-CORE; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; ABRUPT CLIMATE-CHANGE; LAST GLACIAL PERIOD; NORTH-ATLANTIC; MILLENNIAL-SCALE; RECORDS; VARIABILITY; CYCLE
Abstract Astronomical forcing (obliquity and precession) has been thought to modulate Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, yet the detailed quantification of such modulations has not been examined. In this study, we apply the novel Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HHSA) to five polar ice core records, quantifying astronomical forcing's time-varying amplitude modulation of DO events and identifying the preferred obliquity phases for large amplitude modulations. The unique advantages of HHSA over the widely used windowed Fourier spectral analysis for quantifying astronomical forcing's nonlinear modulations of DO events is first demonstrated with a synthetic data that closely resembles DO events recorded in Greenland ice cores (NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 cores on GICC05 modelext timescale). The analysis of paleoclimatic proxies show that statistically significantly more frequent DO events, with larger amplitude modulation in the Greenland region, tend to occur in the decreasing phase of obliquity, especially from its mean value to its minimum value. In the eastern Antarctic, although statistically significantly more DO events tend to occur in the decreasing obliquity phase in general, the preferred phase of obliquity for large amplitude modulation on DO events is a segment of the increasing phase near the maximum obliquity, implying that the physical mechanisms of DO events may be different for the two polar regions. Additionally, by using cross-spectrum and magnitude-squared analyses, Greenland DO mode at a timescale of about 1400 years leads the Antarctic DO mode at the same timescale by about 1000 years. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0277-3791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 971
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M.
Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459
Keywords GEOPHYSICAL DATA; marine surface winds; energy and water cycles
Abstract Are there important differences between reanalysis data and familiar observations and measurements? If so, what are they? This essay evaluates four possible answers that relate to: the role of inference, reliance on forecasts, the need to solve an ill-posed inverse problem, and understanding of errors and uncertainties. The last of these is argued to be most significant. The importance of characterizing uncertainties associated with results—whether those results are observations or measurements, analyses or reanalyses, or forecasts—is emphasized.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 990
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kara, A.B.
Title Mixed layer depth variability over the global ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2003 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 108 Issue C3 Pages
Keywords mixed layer; isothermal layer; seasonal cycle; temperature; salinity; verification
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 482
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kelly, T.B.; Goericke, R.; Kahru, M.; Song, H.; Stukel, M.R.
Title CCE II: Spatial and interannual variability in export efficiency and the biological pump in an eastern boundary current upwelling system with substantial lateral advection Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume 140 Issue Pages 14-25
Keywords CALIFORNIA CURRENT ECOSYSTEM; OCEAN CARBON-CYCLE; COASTAL WATERS; FRONTAL ZONE; TIME-SERIES; FLUX; SINKING; SEA; PACIFIC; ZOOPLANKTON
Abstract Estimating interannual variability in carbon export is a key goal of many marine biogeochemical studies. However, due to variations in export mechanisms between regions, generalized models used to estimate global patterns in export often fail when used for intra-regional analysis. We present here a region-specific model of export production for the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) parameterized using intensive Lagrangian process studies conducted during El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm and neutral phases by the CCE Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program. We find that, contrary to expectations from prominent global algorithms, export efficiency (e-ratio = export / primary productivity) is positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with net primary productivity (NPP). We attribute these results to the substantial horizontal advection found within the region, and verify this assumption by using a Lagrangian particle tracking model to estimate water mass age. We further suggest that sinking particles in the CCE are comprised of a recently-produced, rapidly-sinking component (likely mesozooplankton fecal pellets) and a longer-lived, slowly-sinking component that is likely advected long distances prior to export. We determine a new algorithm for estimating particle export in the CCE from NPP (Export = 0.08 · NPP + 72 mg C m-2 d-1). We apply this algorithm to a two-decade long time series of NPP in the CCE to estimate spatial and interannual variability across multiple ENSO phases. Reduced export during the warm anomaly of 2014-2015 and El Niño 2015-2016 resulted primarily from decreased export in the coastal upwelling region of the CCE; the oligotrophic offshore region exhibited comparatively low seasonal and interannual variability in flux. The model resolves intra-regional patterns of in situ export measurements, and provides a valuable contrast to global export models.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 984
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kelly, T.B.; Goericke, R.; Kahru, M.; Song, H.; Stukel, M.R.
Title CCE II: Spatial and interannual variability in export efficiency and the biological pump in an eastern boundary current upwelling system with substantial lateral advection Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume 140 Issue Pages 14-25
Keywords california current ecosystem; coastal waters; flux; frontal zone; ocean carbon-cycle; oceanography; pacific; sea; sinking; time-series; Zooplankton
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1022
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maue, R. N.
Title Evolution of Frontal Structure Associated with Extratropical Transitioning Hurricanes Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Extratropical Transition, Frontogenesis, Fronts, Quikscat, Cyclone Lifecycles, Warm Seclusion, Frontal Fracture, Potential Vorticity, Hurricane Kate, Hurricane Irene, Hurricane Fabian, Tropical Cyclones
Abstract Many tropical cyclones move poleward, encounter vertical shear associated with the midlatitude circulation, and undergo a process called extratropical transition (ET). One of the many factors affecting the post-transition extratropical storm in terms of reintensification, frontal structure, and overall evolution is the upper-level flow pattern. Schultz et al. (1998) categorized extratropical cyclones according to two of the many possible cyclone paradigms in terms of the upper-level trough configuration: The Norwegian cyclone model (Bjerknes and Solberg 1922) associated with high-amplitude diffluent trough flow and the Shapiro-Keyser cyclone lifecycle (1990) with low-amplitude confluent troughs. Broadly speaking, the former category is associated with a strong, meridionally oriented cold front with a weak warm front while the latter lifecycle usually entails a prominent, zonally oriented warm front. However, as will be shown, simple antipode lifecycle definitions fail to capture hybrid or cross-lifecycle evolution of transitioned tropical cyclones. To exemplify the importance upper-level features such as jet streaks and troughs, a potential vorticity framework is coupled with vector frontogenesis functions to diagnose the interaction between the poleward transitioning cyclone and the midlatitude circulation. Particular focus is concentrated upon the evolution and strength of frontal fracture from both a PV and frontogenesis viewpoint. The final outcome of extratropical transition is highly variable depending on characteristics of the tropical cyclone, SSTs, and environmental factors such as strength of vertical shear. Here, three storms (Irene 1999, Fabian 2003, and Kate 2003) typify the inherent variability of one such ET outcome, warm seclusion. Very strong winds are often observed in excess of 50 ms-1 along the southwestern flank of the storm down the bent-back warm front. The low-level wind field kinematics are examined using vector frontogenesis functions and QuikSCAT winds. A complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) technique is adapted to temporally interpolate ECMWF model fields (T, MSLP) to overpass times of the scatterometer, an improvement over simple linear interpolation. Overall, the above diagnosis is used to support a hypothesis concerning the prevalence of hurricane-force winds surrounding secluded systems.
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 625
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Misra, V.; Selman, C.; Waite, A. J.; Bastola, S.; Mishra, A.
Title Terrestrial and Ocean Climate of the 20th Century Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
Year 2017 Publication Florida's climate: Changes, variations, & impacts Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 485-509
Keywords Seasonal cycle; Diurnal variations; Sea breeze; ENSO; Tropical cyclones; Hurricanes; AWP; AMO; PDO; PIZA
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Florida Climate Institute Place of Publication Gainesville, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P.; Jones, J. W.; Misra, V.; Obeysekera, J.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 849
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, C.; Fu, C.; Wu, Z.; Yan, Z.
Title The role of changes in the annual cycle in earlier onset of climatic spring in northern China Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2011 Publication Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal Adv. Atmos. Sci.
Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 284-296
Keywords spring onset; Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition; modulated annual cycle; Asian winter monsoon; global warming
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0256-1530 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 309
Permanent link to this record

2000 Levy Avenue
Building A, Suite 292
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2741
Phone: (850) 644-4581
Fax: (850) 644-4841
contact@coaps.fsu.edu

© 2020 Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS)