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Author Kara, A.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mixed layer depth variability over the global ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.  
  Volume 108 Issue C3 Pages  
  Keywords mixed layer; isothermal layer; seasonal cycle; temperature; salinity; verification  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 482  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459  
  Keywords GEOPHYSICAL DATA; marine surface winds; energy and water cycles  
  Abstract Are there important differences between reanalysis data and familiar observations and measurements? If so, what are they? This essay evaluates four possible answers that relate to: the role of inference, reliance on forecasts, the need to solve an ill-posed inverse problem, and understanding of errors and uncertainties. The last of these is argued to be most significant. The importance of characterizing uncertainties associated with results—whether those results are observations or measurements, analyses or reanalyses, or forecasts—is emphasized.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 990  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, C.; Wu, Z.; Fu, C.; Zhou, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On multi-timescale variability of temperature in China in modulated annual cycle reference frame Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2010 Publication Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal Adv. Atmos. Sci.  
  Volume 27 Issue 5 Pages 1169-1182  
  Keywords modulated annual cycle; the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition; climate anomaly; climate normal; variability of surface air temperature in China  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0256-1530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 355  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, C.; Fu, C.; Wu, Z.; Yan, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of changes in the annual cycle in earlier onset of climatic spring in northern China Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2011 Publication Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal Adv. Atmos. Sci.  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 284-296  
  Keywords spring onset; Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition; modulated annual cycle; Asian winter monsoon; global warming  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0256-1530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 309  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, C.; Yan, Z.; Wu, Z.; Fu, C.; Tu, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Trends in temperature extremes in association with weather-intraseasonal fluctuations in eastern China Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2011 Publication Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal Adv. Atmos. Sci.  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 297-309  
  Keywords climate extremes; EEMD; weather-intraseasonal fluctuations; modulated annual cycle; global warming  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0256-1530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 310  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Feng, Y.; Wu, Z.; Qiao, F.; Huang, N.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intercomparison between observed and simulated variability in global ocean heat content using empirical mode decomposition, part I: modulated annual cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2013 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn  
  Volume 41 Issue 11-12 Pages 2797-2815  
  Keywords Ocean heat content; Modulated annual cycle; Empirical mode decomposition; Instantaneous frequency; Instantaneous amplitude; CMIP3  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 209  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maue, R. N. url  openurl
  Title Evolution of Frontal Structure Associated with Extratropical Transitioning Hurricanes Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Extratropical Transition, Frontogenesis, Fronts, Quikscat, Cyclone Lifecycles, Warm Seclusion, Frontal Fracture, Potential Vorticity, Hurricane Kate, Hurricane Irene, Hurricane Fabian, Tropical Cyclones  
  Abstract Many tropical cyclones move poleward, encounter vertical shear associated with the midlatitude circulation, and undergo a process called extratropical transition (ET). One of the many factors affecting the post-transition extratropical storm in terms of reintensification, frontal structure, and overall evolution is the upper-level flow pattern. Schultz et al. (1998) categorized extratropical cyclones according to two of the many possible cyclone paradigms in terms of the upper-level trough configuration: The Norwegian cyclone model (Bjerknes and Solberg 1922) associated with high-amplitude diffluent trough flow and the Shapiro-Keyser cyclone lifecycle (1990) with low-amplitude confluent troughs. Broadly speaking, the former category is associated with a strong, meridionally oriented cold front with a weak warm front while the latter lifecycle usually entails a prominent, zonally oriented warm front. However, as will be shown, simple antipode lifecycle definitions fail to capture hybrid or cross-lifecycle evolution of transitioned tropical cyclones. To exemplify the importance upper-level features such as jet streaks and troughs, a potential vorticity framework is coupled with vector frontogenesis functions to diagnose the interaction between the poleward transitioning cyclone and the midlatitude circulation. Particular focus is concentrated upon the evolution and strength of frontal fracture from both a PV and frontogenesis viewpoint. The final outcome of extratropical transition is highly variable depending on characteristics of the tropical cyclone, SSTs, and environmental factors such as strength of vertical shear. Here, three storms (Irene 1999, Fabian 2003, and Kate 2003) typify the inherent variability of one such ET outcome, warm seclusion. Very strong winds are often observed in excess of 50 ms-1 along the southwestern flank of the storm down the bent-back warm front. The low-level wind field kinematics are examined using vector frontogenesis functions and QuikSCAT winds. A complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) technique is adapted to temporally interpolate ECMWF model fields (T, MSLP) to overpass times of the scatterometer, an improvement over simple linear interpolation. Overall, the above diagnosis is used to support a hypothesis concerning the prevalence of hurricane-force winds surrounding secluded systems.  
  Address Department of Meteorology  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 625  
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Author Stukel, M.R.; Aluwihare, L.I.; Barbeau, K.A.; Chekalyuk, A.M.; Goericke, R.; Miller, A.J.; Ohman, M.D.; Ruacho, A.; Song, H.; Stephens, B.M.; Landry, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mesoscale ocean fronts enhance carbon export due to gravitational sinking and subduction Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2017 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 114 Issue 6 Pages 1252-1257  
  Keywords biological carbon pump; carbon cycle; particle flux; particulate organic carbon; plankton  
  Abstract Enhanced vertical carbon transport (gravitational sinking and subduction) at mesoscale ocean fronts may explain the demonstrated imbalance of new production and sinking particle export in coastal upwelling ecosystems. Based on flux assessments from 238U:234Th disequilibrium and sediment traps, we found 2 to 3 times higher rates of gravitational particle export near a deep-water front (305 mg Cm-2d-1) compared with adjacent water or to mean (nonfrontal) regional conditions. Elevated particle flux at the front was mechanistically linked to Fe-stressed diatoms and high mesozooplankton fecal pellet production. Using a data assimilative regional ocean model fit to measured conditions, we estimate that an additional approximately 225 mg Cm-2d-1 was exported as subduction of particle-rich water at the front, highlighting a transport mechanism that is not captured by sediment traps and is poorly quantified by most models and in situ measurements. Mesoscale fronts may be responsible for over a quarter of total organic carbon sequestration in the California Current and other coastal upwelling ecosystems.  
  Address Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:28115723; PMCID:PMC5307443 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 67  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stukel, M.R.; Décima, M.; Landry, M.R.; Selph, K.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nitrogen and isotope flows through the Costa Rica Dome upwelling ecosystem: The crucial mesozooplankton role in export flux Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Global Biogeochemical Cycles Abbreviated Journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles  
  Volume 32 Issue 12 Pages 1815–1832.  
  Keywords Crustaceans; Diel vertical migration; Nitrogen cycle; Biological carbon pump; Nitrogen isotopes; Linear inverse ecosystem model  
  Abstract The Costa Rica Dome (CRD) is an open-ocean upwelling ecosystem, with high biomasses of picophytoplankton (especially Synechococcus), mesozooplankton, and higher trophic levels. To elucidate the food web pathways supporting the trophic structure and carbon export in this unique ecosystem, we used Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to assimilate data from four independent realizations of δ15N and planktonic rate measurements from the CRD into steady state, multicompartment ecosystem box models (linear inverse models). Model results present well-constrained snapshots of ecosystem nitrogen and stable isotope fluxes. New production is supported by upwelled nitrate, not nitrogen fixation. Protistivory (rather than herbivory) was the most important feeding mode for mesozooplankton, which rely heavily on microzooplankton prey. Mesozooplankton play a central role in vertical nitrogen export, primarily through active transport of nitrogen consumed in the surface layer and excreted at depth, which comprised an average 36-46% of total export. Detritus or aggregate feeding is also an important mode of resource acquisition by mesozooplankton and regeneration of nutrients within the euphotic zone. As a consequence, the ratio of passively sinking particle export to phytoplankton production is very low in the CRD. Comparisons to similar models constrained with data from the nearby equatorial Pacific demonstrate that the dominant role of vertical migrators to the biological pump is a unique feature of the CRD. However, both regions show efficient nitrogen transfer from mesozooplankton to higher trophic levels (as expected for regions with large fish, cetacean, and seabird populations) despite the dominance of protists as major grazers of phytoplankton.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stukel, M.R.; Biard, T.; Krause, J.W.; Ohman, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Large Phaeodaria in the twilight zone: Their role in the carbon cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Carbon cycle; Ocean; Twilight zone, Rhizarian measurements; Aulosphaeridae  
  Abstract Advances in in situ imaging allow enumeration of abundant populations of large Rhizarians that compose a substantial proportion of total mesozooplankton biovolume. Using a quasi-Lagrangian sampling scheme, we quantified the abundance, vertical distributions, and sinking&#8208;related mortality of Aulosphaeridae, an abundant family of Phaeodaria in the California Current Ecosystem. Inter&#8208;cruise variability was high, with average concentrations at the depth of maximum abundance ranging from < 10 to > 300 cells m&#8722;3, with seasonal and interannual variability associated with temperature&#8208;preferences and regional shoaling of the 10°C isotherm. Vertical profiles showed that these organisms were consistently most abundant at 100&#65533;150&#8201;m depth. Average turnover times with respect to sinking were 4.7&#65533;10.9 d, equating to minimum in situ population growth rates of ~ 0.1&#65533;0.2 d&#8722;1. Using simultaneous measurements of sinking organic carbon, we find that these organisms could only meet their carbon demand if their carbon : volume ratio were ~ 1 &#956;g C mm&#8722;3. This value is substantially lower than previously used in global estimates of rhizarian biomass, but is reasonable for organisms that use large siliceous tests to inflate their cross&#8208;sectional area without a concomitant increase in biomass. We found that Aulosphaeridae alone can intercept > 20% of sinking particles produced in the euphotic zone before these particles reach a depth of 300&#8201;m. Our results suggest that the local (and likely global) carbon biomass of Aulosphaeridae, and probably the large Rhizaria overall, needs to be revised downwards, but that these organisms nevertheless play a major role in carbon flux attenuation in the twilight zone.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['yes']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 967  
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