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Author Bunge, L.; Clarke, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On the Warm Water Volume and Its Changing Relationship with ENSO Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 44 Issue 5 Pages 1372-1385  
  Keywords Physical Meteorology and Climatology; Climate variability; ENSO; Observational techniques and algorithms; Climate records; Variability; Decadal variability; Interannual variability  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 156  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, M.; Huang, N.E.; Wang, S.; Qiao, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis to quantify the modulation of Dansgaard-Oeschger events by obliquity Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Quaternary Science Reviews Abbreviated Journal Quaternary Science Reviews  
  Volume 192 Issue Pages 282-299  
  Keywords Pleistocene; Paleoclimatology; Greenland; Antarctica; Data treatment; Data analysis; Dansgaard-oeschger (DO) events; Obliquity forcing; Phase preference; Holo-hilbert spectral analysis; Amplitude modulation; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; GREENLAND ICE-CORE; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; ABRUPT CLIMATE-CHANGE; LAST GLACIAL PERIOD; NORTH-ATLANTIC; MILLENNIAL-SCALE; RECORDS; VARIABILITY; CYCLE  
  Abstract Astronomical forcing (obliquity and precession) has been thought to modulate Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, yet the detailed quantification of such modulations has not been examined. In this study, we apply the novel Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HHSA) to five polar ice core records, quantifying astronomical forcing's time-varying amplitude modulation of DO events and identifying the preferred obliquity phases for large amplitude modulations. The unique advantages of HHSA over the widely used windowed Fourier spectral analysis for quantifying astronomical forcing's nonlinear modulations of DO events is first demonstrated with a synthetic data that closely resembles DO events recorded in Greenland ice cores (NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 cores on GICC05 modelext timescale). The analysis of paleoclimatic proxies show that statistically significantly more frequent DO events, with larger amplitude modulation in the Greenland region, tend to occur in the decreasing phase of obliquity, especially from its mean value to its minimum value. In the eastern Antarctic, although statistically significantly more DO events tend to occur in the decreasing obliquity phase in general, the preferred phase of obliquity for large amplitude modulation on DO events is a segment of the increasing phase near the maximum obliquity, implying that the physical mechanisms of DO events may be different for the two polar regions. Additionally, by using cross-spectrum and magnitude-squared analyses, Greenland DO mode at a timescale of about 1400 years leads the Antarctic DO mode at the same timescale by about 1000 years. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0277-3791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 971  
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Author Gilford, D.M.; Smith, S.R.; Griffin, M.L.; Arguez, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Southeastern U.S. Daily Temperature Ranges Associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol.  
  Volume 52 Issue 11 Pages 2434-2449  
  Keywords Climate variability; Climatology; ENSO; Surface temperature; Climate records  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1558-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 180  
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Author Kent, E.C.; Berry, D.I.; Prytherch, J.; Roberts, J.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparison of global marine surface-specific humidity datasets fromin situobservations and atmospheric reanalysis Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Climatology Abbreviated Journal Int. J. Climatol.  
  Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 355-376  
  Keywords marine climatology; atmospheric reanalysis; surface humidity; air� sea interaction; observations; specific humidity  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0899-8418 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 164  
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Author Laurencin, C.; Misra, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characterizing the Variations of the motion of the North Atlantic tropical cyclones Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics Abbreviated Journal Meteorol Atmos Phys  
  Volume 130 Issue 303 Pages 1-12  
  Keywords climatology; interannual scales; environment  
  Abstract In this study, we examine the seasonal and interannual variability of the North Atlantic (NATL) tropical cyclone (TC) motion from the historical Hurricane Database (HURDAT2) over the period 1988-2014. We characterize these motions based on their position, lifecycle, and seasonal cycle. The main findings of this study include: (1) of the 11,469 NATL TC fixes examined between 1988 and 2014, 81% of them had a translation speed of < 20 mph; (2) TCs in the deep tropics of the NATL are invariably slow-moving in comparison with TCs in higher latitudes. Although fast-moving TCs (> 40 mph) are exclusively found north of 30 N, the slow-moving TCs have a wide range of latitude. This is largely a consequence of the background steering flow being weaker (stronger) in the tropical (higher) latitudes with a minimum around the subtropical latitudes of NATL; (3) there is an overall decrease in the frequency of all categories of translation speed of TCs in warm relative to cold El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) years. However, in terms of the percentage change, TCs with a translation speed in the range of 10-20 mph display the most change (42%) in warm relative to cold ENSO years; and (4) there is an overall decrease in frequency across all categories of TC translation speed in small relative to large Atlantic Warm Pool years, but in terms of percentage change in the frequency of TCs, there is a significant and comparable change in the frequency over a wider range of translation speeds than the ENSO composites. This last finding suggests that Atlantic Warm Pool variations have a more profound impact on the translation speed of Atlantic TCs than ENSO.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 991  
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Author Maue, R url  openurl
  Title Warm Seclusion Extratropical Cyclones Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Tropical Cyclone, Extratropical Cyclone, Climatology, Warm Seclusion  
  Abstract The warm seclusion or mature stage of the extratropical cyclone lifecycle often has structural characteristics reminiscent of major tropical cyclones including eye-like moats of calm air at the barotropic warm-core center surrounded by hurricane force winds along the bent-back warm front. Many extratropical cyclones experience periods of explosive intensification or deepening (bomb) as a result of nonlinear dynamical feedbacks associated with latent heat release. Considerable dynamical structure changes occur during short time periods of several hours in which lower stratospheric and upper-tropospheric origin potential vorticity combines with ephemeral lower-tropospheric, diabatically generated potential vorticity to form a coherent, upright tower circulation. At the center, anomalously warm and moist air relative to the surrounding environment is secluded and may exist for days into the future. Even with the considerable body of research conducted during the last century, many questions remain concerning the warm seclusion process. The focus of this work is on the diagnosis, climatology, and synoptic-dynamic development of the warm seclusion and surrounding flank of intense winds. To develop a climatology of warm seclusion and explosive extratropical cyclones, current long-period reanalysis datasets are utilized along with storm tracking procedures and cyclone phase space diagnostics. Limitations of the reanalysis products are discussed with special focus on tropical cyclone diagnosis and the recent dramatic decrease in global accumulated tropical cyclone energy. A large selection of case studies is simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using full-physics and “fake dry” adiabatic runs in order to capture the very fast warm seclusion development. Results are presented concerning the critical role of latent heat release and the combination of advective and diabatically generated potential vorticity in the generation of the coherent tower circulation characteristic of the warm seclusion. To motivate future research, issues related to predictability are discussed with focus on medium-range forecasts of varying extratropical cyclone lifecycles. Additional work is presented relating tropical cyclones and large-scale climate variability with special emphasis on the abrupt and dramatic decline in recent global tropical cyclone accumulated cyclone energy.  
  Address Department of Meteorology  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 570  
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Author Misra, V.; Dirmeyer, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Air, Sea, and Land Interactions of the Continental U.S. Hydroclimate Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Hydrometeorology Abbreviated Journal J. Hydrometeor  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 353-373  
  Keywords Atmosphere-land interaction; Hydrometeorology; Climatology; Air-sea interaction; Multidecadal variability; Coupled models  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1525-755X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 664  
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Author Nielsen, E.R.; Schumacher, R.S.; Keclik, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Effect of the Balcones Escarpment on Three Cases of Extreme Precipitation in Central Texas Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2016 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.  
  Volume 144 Issue 1 Pages 119-138  
  Keywords Circulation/ Dynamics; Orographic effects; Atm/Ocean Structure/ Phenomena; Flood events; Physical Meteorology and Climatology; Hydrometeorology; Forecasting; Ensembles; Numerical weather prediction/forecasting  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 102  
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Author Parfitt, R.; Ummenhofer, C.C.; Buckley, B.M.; Hansen, K.G.; D'Arrigo, R.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Distinct seasonal climate drivers revealed in a network of tree-ring records from Labrador, Canada Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn  
  Volume 54 Issue 3-4 Pages 1897-1911  
  Keywords BLUE INTENSITY; LATEWOOD DENSITY; TEMPERATURE; DENDROCLIMATOLOGY; PRECIPITATION; STANDARDIZATION; VARIABILITY; NUNATSIAVUT; TRENDS; GULF  
  Abstract Traditionally, high-latitude dendroclimatic studies have focused on measurements of total ring width (RW), with the maximum density of the latewood (MXD) serving as a complementary variable. Whilst MXD has typically improved the strength of the growing season climate connection over that of RW, its measurements are costly and time-consuming. Recently, a less costly and more time-efficient technique to extract density measurements has emerged, based on lignin's propensity to absorb blue light. This Blue Intensity (BI) methodology is based on image analyses of finely-sanded core samples, and the relative ease with which density measurements can be extracted allows for significant increases in spatio-temporal sample depth. While some studies have attempted to combine RW and MXD as predictors for summer temperature reconstructions, here we evaluate a systematic comparison of the climate signal for RW and latewood BI (LWBI) separately, using a recently updated and expanded tree ring database for Labrador, Canada. We demonstrate that while RW responds primarily to climatic drivers earlier in the growing season (January-April), LWBI is more responsive to climate conditions during late spring and summer (May-August). Furthermore, RW appears to be driven primarily by large-scale atmospheric dynamics associated with the Pacific North American pattern, whilst LWBI is more closely associated with local climate conditions, themselves linked to the behaviour of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Lastly, we demonstrate that anomalously wide or narrow growth rings consistently respond to the same climate drivers as average growth years, whereas the sensitivity of LWBI to extreme climate conditions appears to be enhanced.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1119  
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Author Perron, M.; Sura, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Climatology of Non-Gaussian Atmospheric Statistics Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 1063-1083  
  Keywords Atmospheric circulation; Extreme events; Climate variability; Climatology; Statistics; Time series  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 225  
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