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Author Deng, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, M.; Huang, N.E.; Wang, S.; Qiao, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis to quantify the modulation of Dansgaard-Oeschger events by obliquity Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Quaternary Science Reviews Abbreviated Journal Quaternary Science Reviews  
  Volume 192 Issue Pages 282-299  
  Keywords Pleistocene; Paleoclimatology; Greenland; Antarctica; Data treatment; Data analysis; Dansgaard-oeschger (DO) events; Obliquity forcing; Phase preference; Holo-hilbert spectral analysis; Amplitude modulation; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; GREENLAND ICE-CORE; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; ABRUPT CLIMATE-CHANGE; LAST GLACIAL PERIOD; NORTH-ATLANTIC; MILLENNIAL-SCALE; RECORDS; VARIABILITY; CYCLE  
  Abstract Astronomical forcing (obliquity and precession) has been thought to modulate Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, yet the detailed quantification of such modulations has not been examined. In this study, we apply the novel Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HHSA) to five polar ice core records, quantifying astronomical forcing's time-varying amplitude modulation of DO events and identifying the preferred obliquity phases for large amplitude modulations. The unique advantages of HHSA over the widely used windowed Fourier spectral analysis for quantifying astronomical forcing's nonlinear modulations of DO events is first demonstrated with a synthetic data that closely resembles DO events recorded in Greenland ice cores (NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 cores on GICC05 modelext timescale). The analysis of paleoclimatic proxies show that statistically significantly more frequent DO events, with larger amplitude modulation in the Greenland region, tend to occur in the decreasing phase of obliquity, especially from its mean value to its minimum value. In the eastern Antarctic, although statistically significantly more DO events tend to occur in the decreasing obliquity phase in general, the preferred phase of obliquity for large amplitude modulation on DO events is a segment of the increasing phase near the maximum obliquity, implying that the physical mechanisms of DO events may be different for the two polar regions. Additionally, by using cross-spectrum and magnitude-squared analyses, Greenland DO mode at a timescale of about 1400 years leads the Antarctic DO mode at the same timescale by about 1000 years. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0277-3791 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 971  
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Author Hou, T.Y.; Yan, M.P.; Wu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Variant Of The Emd Method For Multi-Scale Data Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2009 Publication Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis Abbreviated Journal Adv. Adapt. Data Anal.  
  Volume 01 Issue 04 Pages 483-516  
  Keywords Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD); adaptive data analysis; sparse representation  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1793-5369 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 670  
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Author Huang, T.; Armstrong, E.M.; Bourassa, M.A.; Cram, T.A.; Elya, J.; Greguska, F.; Jacob, J.C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; Quach, N.T.; McGibbney, L.J.; Smith, S.R.; Wilson, B.D.; Worley S.J.; Yang, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Integrated Data Analytics Platform Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords big data, Cloud computing, Ocean science, data analysis, Matchup, anomaly detection, open source  
  Abstract An Integrated Science Data Analytics Platform is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a NASA technology integration project to establish a cloud-based Integrated Ocean Science Data Analytics Platform for big ocean science at NASA�s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) for big ocean science. It focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, in situ to satellite data matchup, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery.

Our communities are relying on data available through distributed data centers to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20PB of observational data during its 3-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing Earth Science data archival, distribution and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.
 
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1038  
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Author Wu, Z.; Huang, N.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition: A Noise-Assisted Data Analysis Method Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2009 Publication Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis Abbreviated Journal Adv. Adapt. Data Anal.  
  Volume 01 Issue 01 Pages 1-41  
  Keywords Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD); ensemble empirical mode decompositions; noise-assisted data analysis (NADA); Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF); shifting stoppage criteria; end effect reduction Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S1793536909000047  
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  ISSN 1793-5369 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 667  
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Author Wu, Z.; Feng, J.; Qiao, F.; Tan, Z.-M. url  doi
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  Title Fast multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition for the analysis of big spatio-temporal datasets Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2016 Publication Philosophical Transactions. Series A, Mathematical, Physical, and Engineering Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci  
  Volume 374 Issue 2065 Pages 20150197  
  Keywords adaptive and local data analysis; data compression; empirical orthogonal function; fast algorithm; multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition; principal component analysis  
  Abstract In this big data era, it is more urgent than ever to solve two major issues: (i) fast data transmission methods that can facilitate access to data from non-local sources and (ii) fast and efficient data analysis methods that can reveal the key information from the available data for particular purposes. Although approaches in different fields to address these two questions may differ significantly, the common part must involve data compression techniques and a fast algorithm. This paper introduces the recently developed adaptive and spatio-temporally local analysis method, namely the fast multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD), for the analysis of a large spatio-temporal dataset. The original MEEMD uses ensemble empirical mode decomposition to decompose time series at each spatial grid and then pieces together the temporal-spatial evolution of climate variability and change on naturally separated timescales, which is computationally expensive. By taking advantage of the high efficiency of the expression using principal component analysis/empirical orthogonal function analysis for spatio-temporally coherent data, we design a lossy compression method for climate data to facilitate its non-local transmission. We also explain the basic principles behind the fast MEEMD through decomposing principal components instead of original grid-wise time series to speed up computation of MEEMD. Using a typical climate dataset as an example, we demonstrate that our newly designed methods can (i) compress data with a compression rate of one to two orders; and (ii) speed-up the MEEMD algorithm by one to two orders.  
  Address School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China  
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  ISSN 1364-503X ISBN Medium  
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  Funding PMID:26953173; PMCID:PMC4792406 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 57  
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