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Author Ali, M.; Singh, N.; Kumar, M.; Zheng, Y.; Bourassa, M.; Kishtawal, C.; Rao, C.
Title Dominant Modes of Upper Ocean Heat Content in the North Indian Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Climate Abbreviated Journal Climate
Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages 71
Keywords ocean heat content; tropical cyclone heat potential; dominant modes; North Indian Ocean; SUMMER MONSOON; INTENSIFICATION; INTENSITY; PACIFIC
Abstract The thermal energy needed for the development of hurricanes and monsoons as well as any prolonged marine weather event comes from layers in the upper oceans, not just from the thin layer represented by sea surface temperature alone. Ocean layers have different modes of thermal energy variability because of the different time scales of ocean-atmosphere interaction. Although many previous studies have focused on the influence of upper ocean heat content (OHC) on tropical cyclones and monsoons, no study thus farparticularly in the North Indian Ocean (NIO)has specifically concluded the types of dominant modes in different layers of the ocean. In this study, we examined the dominant modes of variability of OHC of seven layers in the NIO during 1998-2014. We conclude that the thermal variability in the top 50 m of the ocean had statistically significant semiannual and annual modes of variability, while the deeper layers had the annual mode alone. Time series of OHC for the top four layers were analyzed separately for the NIO, Arabian Sea, and Bay of Bengal. For the surface to 50 m layer, the lowest and the highest values of OHC were present in January and May every year, respectively, which was mainly caused by the solar radiation cycle.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2225-1154 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 986
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Author Maue, R.N.; Hart, R.E.
Title Comment on “Low frequency variability in globally integrated tropical cyclone power dissipation” by Ryan Sriver and Matthew Huber Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2007 Publication Geophysical Research Letters Abbreviated Journal Geophys. Res. Lett.
Volume 34 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords hurricane; intensity; trend
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0094-8276 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 697
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Author Mirhosseini, G.; Srivastava, P.; Stefanova, L.
Title The impact of climate change on rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves in Alabama Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2013 Publication Regional Environmental Change Abbreviated Journal Reg Environ Change
Volume 13 Issue S1 Pages 25-33
Keywords Climate change; Intensity–Duration–Frequency (IDF) curve; Temporal downscaling; General Circulation Models (GCMs)
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1436-3798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 221
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Author Parfitt, R.; Ummenhofer, C.C.; Buckley, B.M.; Hansen, K.G.; D'Arrigo, R.D.
Title Distinct seasonal climate drivers revealed in a network of tree-ring records from Labrador, Canada Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2020 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 54 Issue 3-4 Pages 1897-1911
Keywords BLUE INTENSITY; LATEWOOD DENSITY; TEMPERATURE; DENDROCLIMATOLOGY; PRECIPITATION; STANDARDIZATION; VARIABILITY; NUNATSIAVUT; TRENDS; GULF
Abstract Traditionally, high-latitude dendroclimatic studies have focused on measurements of total ring width (RW), with the maximum density of the latewood (MXD) serving as a complementary variable. Whilst MXD has typically improved the strength of the growing season climate connection over that of RW, its measurements are costly and time-consuming. Recently, a less costly and more time-efficient technique to extract density measurements has emerged, based on lignin's propensity to absorb blue light. This Blue Intensity (BI) methodology is based on image analyses of finely-sanded core samples, and the relative ease with which density measurements can be extracted allows for significant increases in spatio-temporal sample depth. While some studies have attempted to combine RW and MXD as predictors for summer temperature reconstructions, here we evaluate a systematic comparison of the climate signal for RW and latewood BI (LWBI) separately, using a recently updated and expanded tree ring database for Labrador, Canada. We demonstrate that while RW responds primarily to climatic drivers earlier in the growing season (January-April), LWBI is more responsive to climate conditions during late spring and summer (May-August). Furthermore, RW appears to be driven primarily by large-scale atmospheric dynamics associated with the Pacific North American pattern, whilst LWBI is more closely associated with local climate conditions, themselves linked to the behaviour of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Lastly, we demonstrate that anomalously wide or narrow growth rings consistently respond to the same climate drivers as average growth years, whereas the sensitivity of LWBI to extreme climate conditions appears to be enhanced.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1119
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