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Author Steffen, J.; Bourassa, M.
Title Barrier Layer Development Local to Tropical Cyclones based on Argo Float Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.
Volume 48 Issue 9 Pages 1951-1968
Keywords SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURE; UPPER-OCEAN RESPONSE; NINO SOUTHERN-OSCILLATION; MIXED-LAYER; INDIAN-OCEAN; HEAT-BUDGET; NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS; HURRICANES; VARIABILITY; PACIFIC
Abstract The objective of this study is to quantify barrier layer development due to tropical cyclone (TC) passage using Argo float observations of temperature and salinity. To accomplish this objective, a climatology of Argo float measurements is developed from 2001 to 2014 for the Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and central Pacific basins. Each Argo float sample consists of a prestorm and poststorm temperature and salinity profile pair. In addition, a no-TC Argo pair dataset is derived for comparison to account for natural ocean state variability and instrument sensitivity. The Atlantic basin shows a statistically significant increase in barrier layer thickness (BLT) and barrier layer potential energy (BLPE) that is largely attributable to an increase of 2.6 m in the post-TC isothermal layer depth (ITLD). The eastern Pacific basin shows no significant changes to any barrier layer characteristic, likely due to a shallow and highly stratified pycnocline. However, the near-surface layer freshens in the upper 30 m after TC passage, which increases static stability. Finally, the central Pacific has a statistically significant freshening in the upper 20-30 m that increases upper-ocean stratification by similar to 35%. The mechanisms responsible for increases in BLPE vary between the Atlantic and both Pacific basins; the Atlantic is sensitive to ITLD deepening, while the Pacific basins show near-surface freshening to be more important in barrier layer development. In addition, Argo data subsets are used to investigate the physical relationships between the barrier layer and TC intensity, TC translation speed, radial distance from TC center, and time after TC passage.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 970
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Author Stukel, M.R.; Biard, T.; Krause, J.W.; Ohman, M.D.
Title Large Phaeodaria in the twilight zone: Their role in the carbon cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Carbon cycle; Ocean; Twilight zone, Rhizarian measurements; Aulosphaeridae
Abstract Advances in in situ imaging allow enumeration of abundant populations of large Rhizarians that compose a substantial proportion of total mesozooplankton biovolume. Using a quasi-Lagrangian sampling scheme, we quantified the abundance, vertical distributions, and sinking&#8208;related mortality of Aulosphaeridae, an abundant family of Phaeodaria in the California Current Ecosystem. Inter&#8208;cruise variability was high, with average concentrations at the depth of maximum abundance ranging from < 10 to > 300 cells m&#8722;3, with seasonal and interannual variability associated with temperature&#8208;preferences and regional shoaling of the 10°C isotherm. Vertical profiles showed that these organisms were consistently most abundant at 100&#65533;150&#8201;m depth. Average turnover times with respect to sinking were 4.7&#65533;10.9 d, equating to minimum in situ population growth rates of ~ 0.1&#65533;0.2 d&#8722;1. Using simultaneous measurements of sinking organic carbon, we find that these organisms could only meet their carbon demand if their carbon : volume ratio were ~ 1 &#956;g C mm&#8722;3. This value is substantially lower than previously used in global estimates of rhizarian biomass, but is reasonable for organisms that use large siliceous tests to inflate their cross&#8208;sectional area without a concomitant increase in biomass. We found that Aulosphaeridae alone can intercept > 20% of sinking particles produced in the euphotic zone before these particles reach a depth of 300&#8201;m. Our results suggest that the local (and likely global) carbon biomass of Aulosphaeridae, and probably the large Rhizaria overall, needs to be revised downwards, but that these organisms nevertheless play a major role in carbon flux attenuation in the twilight zone.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['yes']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 967
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Author Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; Sharp, R.J.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title Air-sea Coupling During the Tropical Cyclones in the Indian Ocean: A Case Study Using Satellite Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2005 Publication Pure and Applied Geophysics Abbreviated Journal Pure appl. geophys.
Volume 162 Issue 8-9 Pages 1643-1672
Keywords tropical cyclones; Indian Ocean; EOL; OLR; sea-surface salinity; mixed layer depth; Remote Sensing
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-4553 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 452
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Author Todd, Austin
Title Circulation Dynamics and Larval Transport Mechanisms in the Florida Big Bend Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 228
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Author Todd, A.C.; Morey, S.L.; Chassignet, E.P.
Title Circulation and cross-shelf transport in the Florida Big Bend Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Marine Research Abbreviated Journal J Mar Res
Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 445-475
Keywords Coastal circulation; ocean modeling; larval transport; gag grouper; Florida Big Bend
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2402 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding BP/Deep-C, NOAA NGI, NASA/JPL/OVWST, ONR Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 148
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Author Tseng, Y.-heng; Lin, H.; Chen, H.-ching; Thompson, K.; Bentsen, M.; Böning, C.W.; Bozec, A.; Cassou, C.; Chassignet, E.; Chow, C.H.; Danabasoglu, G.; Danilov, S.; Farneti, R.; Fogli, P.G.; Fujii, Y.; Griffies, S.M.; Ilicak, M.; Jung, T.; Masina, S.; Navarra, A.; Patara, L.; Samuels, B.L.; Scheinert, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Sui, C.-H.; Tsujino, H.; Valcke, S.; Voldoire, A.; Wang, Q.; Yeager, S.G.
Title North and equatorial Pacific Ocean circulation in the CORE-II hindcast simulations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Ocean Modelling Abbreviated Journal Ocean Modelling
Volume 104 Issue Pages 143-170
Keywords CORE global ocean-ice simulations; Kuroshio; Mode water; Subtropical cell; North Pacific simulations
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1463-5003 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 55
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Author van Sebille, E.; Griffies, S.M.; Abernathey, R.; Adams, T.P.; Berloff, P.; Biastoch, A.; Blanke, B.; Chassignet, E.P.; Cheng, Y.; Cotter, C.J.; Deleersnijder, E.; Döös, K.; Drake, H.F.; Drijfhout, S.; Gary, S.F.; Heemink, A.W.; Kjellsson, J.; Koszalka, I.M.; Lange, M.; Lique, C.; MacGilchrist, G.A.; Marsh, R.; Mayorga Adame, C.G.; McAdam, R.; Nencioli, F.; Paris, C.B.; Piggott, M.D.; Polton, J.A.; Rühs, S.; Shah, S.H.A.M.; Thomas, M.D.; Wang, J.; Wolfram, P.J.; Zanna, L.; Zika, J.D.
Title Lagrangian ocean analysis: Fundamentals and practices Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Ocean Modelling Abbreviated Journal Ocean Modelling
Volume 121 Issue Pages 49-75
Keywords Ocean circulation; Lagrangian analysis; Connectivity; Particle tracking; Future modelling
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1463-5003 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 466
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Author Wallcraft, A.J.; Kara, A.B.; Hurlburt, H.E.; Chassignet, E.P.; Halliwell, G.H.
Title Value of bulk heat flux parameterizations for ocean SST prediction Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2008 Publication Journal of Marine Systems Abbreviated Journal Journal of Marine Systems
Volume 74 Issue 1-2 Pages 241-258
Keywords Bulk heat fluxes; Ocean model SST; Exchange coefficients; Atmospheric forcing; Climate
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 405
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Author Winterbottom, H
Title The Development of a High-Resolution Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model and Applications Toward Understanding the Limiting Factors for Tropical Cyclone Intensity Prediction Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Tropical cyclone vortex initialization, Coupled atmosphere-ocean model
Abstract The prediction of tropical cyclone (TC) motion has improved greatly in recent decades. However, similar trends remain absent with respect to TC intensity prediction. Several hypotheses have been proposed attempting to explain why dynamical NWP models struggle to predict TC intensity. The leading candidates are as follows: (1) the lack of an evolving ocean (i.e., sea-surface temperature) boundary condition which responds as a function of the atmosphere (e.g., TC) forcing, (2) inappropriate initial conditions for the TC vortex (e.g., lack of data assimilation methods), (3) NWP model grid-length resolutions which are unable to resolve the temporal and length scale for the features believed responsible for TC vortex intensity. modulations (i.e., eye-wall dynamics, momentum transport, vortex Rossby wave interactions, etc.), and (4) physical parametrization which do not adequately represent the air-sea interactions observed during TC passage. In this study, a coupling algorithm for two independent, high-resolution, and state-of-the-art atmosphere and ocean models is developed. The atmosphere model -- the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model is coupled to the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) using a (UNIX) platform independent and innovative coupling methodology. Further, within the WRF-ARW framework, a dynamic initialization algorithm is developed to specify the TC vortex initial condition while preserving the synoptic-scale environment. Each of the tools developed in this study is implemented for a selected case-study: TC Bertha (2008) and TC Gustav (2008) for the coupled-model and TC vortex initialization, respectively. The experiment results suggest that the successful prediction (with respect to the observations) for both the ocean response and the TC intensity cannot be achieved by simply incorporating (i.e., coupling) an ocean model and/or by improving the initial structure for the TC. Rather the physical parametrization governing the air-sea interactions is suggested as the one of the weaknesses for the NWP model. This hypothesis is (indirectly) supported through a diagnostic evaluation of the synoptic-scale features (e.g., sea-level pressure and the deep-layer mean wind beyond the influence of the TC) while the assimilated TC vortex is nudged toward the observed intensity value. It is found -- in the case of TC Gustav (2008) using WRF-ARW, that as the assimilated TC vortex intensity approaches that of the observed, the balance between the mass and momentum states for WRF-ARW is compromised leading to unrealistic features for the environmental sea-level pressure and deep-layer (800- to 200-hPa) mean wind surrounding the TC. Forcing WRF-ARW to assimilate a TC vortex of the observed maximum wind-speed intensity may ultimately compromise the prediction for the TC's motion and subsequently mitigate any gains for the corresponding intensity prediction.Suggestions for additions to the coupled atmosphere-ocean model include a wave-model (WAVEWATCH3), the assimilation of troposphere thermodynamic observations, and modifications to the existing atmospheric boundary-layer parametrization. The current suite of atmosphere model parametrizations do not accurately simulate the observed azimuthal and radial variations for the exchange coefficients (e.g., drag and enthalpy) that have been indicated as potentialpredictor variables for TC intensity modulation. However, these modifications should be implemented only after the limitations for the current coupled-model and TC vortex initialization methods are fully evaluated.
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 572
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Author Xu, X.; Rhines, P.B.; Chassignet, E.P.
Title On Mapping the Diapycnal Water Mass Transformation of the Upper North Atlantic Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.
Volume 48 Issue 10 Pages 2233-2258
Keywords Atmosphere-ocean interaction; Boundary currents; Diapycnal mixing; Fronts; Thermocline circulation
Abstract Diapycnal water mass transformation is the essence behind the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and the associated heat/freshwater transports. Existing studies have mostly focused on the transformation that is forced by surface buoyancy fluxes, and the role of interior mixing is much less known. This study maps the three-dimensional structure of the diapycnal transformation, both surface forced and mixing induced, using results of a high-resolution numerical model that have been shown to represent the large-scale structure of the AMOC and the North Atlantic subpolar/subtropical gyres well. The analyses show that 1) annual mean transformation takes place seamlessly from the subtropical to the subpolar North Atlantic following the surface buoyancy loss along the northward-flowing upper AMOC limb; 2) mixing, including wintertime convection and warm-season restratification by mesoscale eddies in the mixed layer and submixed layer diapycnal mixing, drives transformations of (i) Subtropical Mode Water in the southern part of the subtropical gyre and (ii) Labrador Sea Water in the Labrador Sea and on its southward path in the western Newfoundland Basin; and 3) patterns of diapycnal transformations toward lighter and denser water do not align zonally&#65533;the net three-dimensional transformation is significantly stronger than the zonally integrated, two-dimensional AMOC streamfunction (50% in the southern subtropical North Atlantic and 60% in the western subpolar North Atlantic).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 951
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