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Author Harris, R.; Pollman, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Landing, W.; Axelrad, D.; Morey, S.L.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Vijayaraghavan, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A screening model analysis of mercury sources, fate and bioaccumulation in the Gulf of Mexico Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2012 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 119 Issue Pages 53-63  
  Keywords Animals; Calibration; Environmental Exposure; Fishes/metabolism; Humans; Mercury/*chemistry/metabolism; *Models, Theoretical; Seawater/*chemistry; Water Pollutants, Chemical/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract A mass balance model of mercury (Hg) cycling and bioaccumulation was applied to the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf), coupled with outputs from hydrodynamic and atmospheric Hg deposition models. The dominant overall source of Hg to the Gulf is the Atlantic Ocean. Gulf waters do not mix fully however, resulting in predicted spatial differences in the relative importance of external Hg sources to Hg levels in water, sediments and biota. Direct atmospheric Hg deposition, riverine inputs, and Atlantic inputs were each predicted to be the most important source of Hg to at least one of the modeled regions in the Gulf. While incomplete, mixing of Gulf waters is predicted to be sufficient that fish Hg levels in any given location are affected by Hg entering other regions of the Gulf. This suggests that a Gulf-wide approach is warranted to reduce Hg loading and elevated Hg concentrations currently observed in some fish species. Basic data to characterize Hg concentrations and cycling in the Gulf are lacking but needed to adequately understand the relationship between Hg sources and fish Hg concentrations.  
  Address Reed Harris Environmental Ltd., 180 Forestwood Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J4E6, Canada. reed@reed-harris.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:23102631 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 234  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Harris, R.; Pollman, C.; Landing, W.; Evans, D.; Axelrad, D.; Hutchinson, D.; Morey, S.L.; Rumbold, D.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Adams, D.H.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Holmes, C.; Atkinson, R.D.; Myers, T.; Sunderland, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mercury in the Gulf of Mexico: sources to receptors Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2012 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 119 Issue Pages 42-52  
  Keywords Air Pollutants/chemistry; Animals; Environmental Exposure; Food Chain; Geologic Sediments/chemistry; Humans; Mercury/*chemistry/metabolism; Seawater/*chemistry; Water Pollutants, Chemical/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) fisheries account for 41% of the U.S. marine recreational fish catch and 16% of the nation's marine commercial fish landings. Mercury (Hg) concentrations are elevated in some fish species in the Gulf, including king mackerel, sharks, and tilefish. All five Gulf states have fish consumption advisories based on Hg. Per-capita fish consumption in the Gulf region is elevated compared to the U.S. national average, and recreational fishers in the region have a potential for greater MeHg exposure due to higher levels of fish consumption. Atmospheric wet Hg deposition is estimated to be higher in the Gulf region compared to most other areas in the U.S., but the largest source of Hg to the Gulf as a whole is the Atlantic Ocean (>90%) via large flows associated with the Loop Current. Redistribution of atmospheric, Atlantic and terrestrial Hg inputs to the Gulf occurs via large scale water circulation patterns, and further work is needed to refine estimates of the relative importance of these Hg sources in terms of contributing to fish Hg levels in different regions of the Gulf. Measurements are needed to better quantify external loads, in-situ concentrations, and fluxes of total Hg and methylmercury in the water column, sediments, and food web.  
  Address Reed Harris Environmental Ltd, 180 Forestwood Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J4E6, Canada. reed@reed-harris.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:23098613 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 233  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Morey, S.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Bourassa, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurement Characteristics of Near-Surface Currents from Ultra-Thin Drifters, Drogued Drifters, and HF Radar Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 10 Issue 10 Pages 1633  
  Keywords surface drifters; surface currents; HF Radar; STOKES DRIFT; SEA-SURFACE; WAVES; BREAKING; VALIDATION; TRANSPORT  
  Abstract Concurrent measurements by satellite tracked drifters of different hull and drogue configurations and coastal high-frequency radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface velocity. These measurements are important for understanding and predicting material transport on the ocean surface as well as the vertical structure of the near-surface currents. These near-surface current observations were obtained during a field experiment in the northern Gulf of Mexico intended to test a new ultra-thin drifter design. During the experiment, thirty small cylindrical drifters with 5 cm height, twenty-eight similar drifters with 10 cm hull height, and fourteen drifters with 91 cm tall drogues centered at 100 cm depth were deployed within the footprint of coastal High-Frequency (HF) radar. Comparison of collocated velocity measurements reveals systematic differences in surface velocity estimates obtained from the different measurement techniques, as well as provides information on properties of the drifter behavior and near-surface shear. Results show that the HF radar velocity estimates had magnitudes significantly lower than the 5 cm and 10 cm drifter velocity of approximately 45% and 35%, respectively. The HF radar velocity magnitudes were similar to the drogued drifter velocity. Analysis of wave directional spectra measurements reveals that surface Stokes drift accounts for much of the velocity difference between the drogued drifters and the thin surface drifters except during times of wave breaking.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 985  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baigorria, G.; Jones, J.; Shin, D.; Mishra, A.; Ingram, K. T., Jones, J. W., O'Brien, J. J., Roncoli, M. C., Fraisse, C., Breuer, N. E., Bartels, W.-L., Zierden, D. F., Letson, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing uncertainties in crop model simulations using daily bias-corrected Regional Circulation Model outputs Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2007 Publication Climate Research Abbreviated Journal Clim. Res.  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 211-222  
  Keywords crop yield forecasts; regional circulation models; crop models; bias correction; seasonal climate forecasts  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0936-577X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 421  
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Author McNaught, C. url  openurl
  Title The Increasing Intensity and Frequency of ENSO and its Impacts to the Southeast U.S. Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords ENSO; El-Nino; climate; meteorology; southeast climate; weather; time series; sea-surface temperatures; La-Nina  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Bachelor's thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 165  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Glazer, R. H. url  openurl
  Title The Influence of Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Gradients on Tropical Cyclones Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Air-Sea Interaction; Numerical Modeling; Sea Surface Temperature; Tropical Cyclones; Tropical Meteorology  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 161  
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Author Michael, J.-P. url  openurl
  Title On Initializing CGCMs for Seasonal Predictability of ENSO Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords ENSO; Seasonal Forecasting  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 166  
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Author Hughes, P. J. url  openurl
  Title The Influence of Small-Scale Sea Surface Temperature Gradients on Surface Vector Winds and Subsequent Impacts on Oceanic Ekman Pumping Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Air-Sea Interaction; Sea Surface Temperature Gradients; SST-wind relationship; Surface Vector Winds  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 162  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hite, M. M. url  openurl
  Title Vorticity-Based Detection of Tropical Cyclogenesis Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Quikscat, Seawinds, Tropical Disturbance, Tropical Cyclogenesis, Vorticity  
  Abstract Ocean wind vectors from the SeaWinds scatterometer on QuikSCAT and GOES imagery are used to develop an objective technique that can detect and monitor tropical disturbances associated with the early stages of tropical cyclogenesis in the Atlantic basin. The technique is based on identification of surface vorticity and wind speed signatures that exceed certain threshold magnitudes, with vorticity averaged over an appropriate spatial scale. The threshold values applied herein are determined from the precursors of 15 tropical cyclones during the 1999-2004 Atlantic hurricane seasons using research-quality QuikSCAT data. Tropical disturbances are found for these cases within a range of 19 hours to 101 hours before classification as tropical cyclones by the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The 15 cases are further subdivided based upon their origination source (i.e., easterly wave, upper-level cut-off low, stagnant frontal zone, etc). Primary focus centers on the cases associated with tropical waves, since these waves account for approximately 63% of all Atlantic tropical cyclones. The detection technique illustrates the ability to track these tropical disturbances from near the coast of Africa. Analysis of the pre-tropical cyclone (TC) tracks for these cases depict stages, related to wind speed and precipitation, in the evolution of an easterly wave to tropical cyclone.  
  Address Department of Meteorology  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 616  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Briggs, K. url  openurl
  Title ENSO Event Reproduction: A Comparison of an EOF vs. A Cyclostationary (CSEOF) Approach Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords EOF, Autoregression, Wind Stress, Sea Level Height, SST, ENSO, Regression, CSEOF, Cyclostationary  
  Abstract In past studies, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events have been linked to devastating weather extremes. Climate modeling of ENSO is often dependent on limited records of the pertinent physical variables, thus longer records of these variables is desirable. Noisy signals, such as monthly sea surface temperature, are good candidates for reproduction by several existing auto-regression techniques. Through auto-regression, influential principal component modes are broken down into a series of time points that are each dependent upon an optimal weighting of the surrounding points. Using these unique numerical relationships, a noisy signal can be reproduced by thus processing the leading modes and adding an artificial record of properly distributed noise. Statistical measures of important ENSO regions suggest that the nature of oceanic and atmospheric anomalous events is cyclic with respect to certain timescales; for example, the monthly timescale. To detect ENSO signals in the presence of a varying background noise field, the detection method should take into account the signal's strong phase-locking with this nested variation. Cyclostationary Emperical Orthogonal Functions (CSEOFs) are built upon the idea of nested cycles, unlike traditional EOFs, which incorporate a design that is better detailed for stationary processes. In this study, both EOF and CSEOF modes of a 50-year Pacific SST record are processed using an auto-regression technique, and several sets of artificial SST records are constructed. Appropriate statistical indices are applied to these artificial time series to ensure an acceptable consistency with the real record, and then artificial data is produced using the artificial time series. In all cases, the cyclostationary approach produces more realistic warm ENSO events with respect to timing, strength, and other traits than does the stationary approach. However, both methods produce only a fair representation of cold events, suggesting that further study is necessary for improvement of La Niña modeling. Shorter records of variables such as sea level height and Pacific wind stress anomalies can hinder the usefulness of auto-regression, owing to time point dependence on surrounding points. Using a regression technique to find an evolutionary consistency (i.e. physically consistent patterns) between one of these variables and a variable with a longer record (such as SST) can eliminate this problem. Once a regression relationship is found between two variables, the variable with the shorter record can be re-written to match the time evolution of the variable with the longer record. Here regression, both EOF and CSEOF, is performed on both sea surface temperature and sea level height (a 20-year record), and sea surface temperature and wind stress (a 39-year record). Once the regression relationships are found, artificial SST time series are incorporated in place of the original time series to produce several artificial 50-year SLH and wind stress data sets. 5 Pacific regions are chosen, and statistics and behavior of the artificial sets within these regions are compared to those of the original data. Once again the cyclostationary approach fares better than the stationary. In particular the EOF assumption of cross correlational symmetry fails to capture the direction-dependence of ENSO evolution, causing inconsistent ENSO behavior. This renders an EOF method insufficient for climate modeling and prediction, and implies that a better aim is to incorporate physical cyclic features via a cyclostationary method.  
  Address Department of Meteorology  
  Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']  
  Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 614  
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