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Author Yu, B.; Seed, A.; Pu, L.; Malone, T.
Title Integration of weather radar data into a raster GIS framework for improved flood estimation Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Atmospheric Science Letters Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Sci. Lett.
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords
Abstract We present in this paper the interannual variability of seasonal temperature and rainfall in the Indian meteorological subdivisions (IMS) for boreal winter and summer seasons that take in to account the varying length of the seasons.Our study reveals that accounting for the variations in the length of the sea-sons produces stronger teleconnections between the seasonal anomalies of surface temperature and rainfall over India with corresponding sea surface temperature anomalies of the tropical Oceans (especially over the northern Indian and the equatorial Pacific Oceans) compared to the same teleconnections from fixed length seasons over the IMS. It should be noted that the IMS show significant spatial heterogeneity in these teleconnections
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1530-261X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1069
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Author Zeng, H.; Chambers, J.Q.; Negron-Juarez, R.I.; Hurtt, G.C.; Baker, D.B.; Powell, M.D.
Title Impacts of tropical cyclones on U.S. forest tree mortality and carbon flux from 1851 to 2000 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2009 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 106 Issue 19 Pages 7888-7892
Keywords Biodiversity; Biomass; Carbon; *Cyclonic Storms; Ecosystem; Greenhouse Effect; Models, Statistical; Southeastern United States; *Trees; United States
Abstract Tropical cyclones cause extensive tree mortality and damage to forested ecosystems. A number of patterns in tropical cyclone frequency and intensity have been identified. There exist, however, few studies on the dynamic impacts of historical tropical cyclones at a continental scale. Here, we synthesized field measurements, satellite image analyses, and empirical models to evaluate forest and carbon cycle impacts for historical tropical cyclones from 1851 to 2000 over the continental U.S. Results demonstrated an average of 97 million trees affected each year over the entire United States, with a 53-Tg annual biomass loss, and an average carbon release of 25 Tg y(-1). Over the period 1980-1990, released CO(2) potentially offset the carbon sink in forest trees by 9-18% over the entire United States. U.S. forests also experienced twice the impact before 1900 than after 1900 because of more active tropical cyclones and a larger extent of forested areas. Forest impacts were primarily located in Gulf Coast areas, particularly southern Texas and Louisiana and south Florida, while significant impacts also occurred in eastern North Carolina. Results serve as an important baseline for evaluating how potential future changes in hurricane frequency and intensity will impact forest tree mortality and carbon balance.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, 400 Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA. hzeng@tulane.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding PMID:19416842; PMCID:PMC2683102 Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 658
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Author Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Shu, Q.; Zhao, C.; Wang, G.; Wu, Z.; Qiao, F.
Title Spatiotemporal evolution of the chlorophyll a trend in the North Atlantic Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 612 Issue Pages 1141-1148
Keywords Chlorophyll a; Dipole pattern; Multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition; Propagation; Spatiotemporal evolution; The variable trend
Abstract Analyses of the chlorophyll a concentration (chla) from satellite ocean color products have suggested the decadal-scale variability of chla linked to the climate change. The decadal-scale variability in chla is both spatially and temporally non-uniform. We need to understand the spatiotemporal evolution of chla in decadal or multi-decadal timescales to better evaluate its linkage to climate variability. Here, the spatiotemporal evolution of the chla trend in the North Atlantic Ocean for the period 1997-2016 is analyzed using the multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition method. We find that this variable trend signal of chla shows a dipole pattern between the subpolar gyre and along the Gulf Stream path, and propagation along the opposite direction of the North Atlantic Current. This propagation signal has an overlapping variability of approximately twenty years. Our findings suggest that the spatiotemporal evolution of chla during the two most recent decades is part of the multidecadal variations and possibly regulated by the changes of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, whereas the mechanisms of such evolution patterns still need to be explored.
Address First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao, China; Laboratory for Regional Oceanography and Numerical Modeling, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao, China; Key Laboratory of Data Analysis and Applications, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao, China. Electronic address: qiaofl@fio.org.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding PMID:28892858 Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 363
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