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Author Villas Bôas, A.B.; Ardhuin, F.; Ayet, A.; Bourassa, M.A.; Brandt, P.; Chapron, B.; Cornuelle, B.D.; Farrar, J.T.; Fewings, M.R.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Gille, S.T.; Gommenginger, C.; Heimbach, P.; Hell, M.C.; Li, Q.; Mazloff, M.R.; Merrifield, S.T.; Mouche, A.; Rio, M.H.; Rodriguez, E.; Shutler, J.D.; Subramanian, A.C.; Terrill, E.J.; Tsamados, M.; Ubelmann, C.; van Sebille, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Integrated Observations of Global Surface Winds, Currents, and Waves: Requirements and Challenges for the Next Decade Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Ocean surface winds, currents, and waves play a crucial role in exchanges of momentum, energy, heat, freshwater, gases, and other tracers between the ocean, atmosphere, and ice. Despite surface waves being strongly coupled to the upper ocean circulation and the overlying atmosphere, efforts to improve ocean, atmospheric, and wave observations and models have evolved somewhat independently. From an observational point of view, community efforts to bridge this gap have led to proposals for satellite Doppler oceanography mission concepts, which could provide unprecedented measurements of absolute surface velocity and directional wave spectrum at global scales. This paper reviews the present state of observations of surface winds, currents, and waves, and it outlines observational gaps that limit our current understanding of coupled processes that happen at the air-sea-ice interface. A significant challenge for the coming decade of wind, current, and wave observations will come in combining and interpreting measurements from (a) wave-buoys and high-frequency radars in coastal regions, (b) surface drifters and wave-enabled drifters in the open-ocean, marginal ice zones, and wave-current interaction �hot-spots,� and (c) simultaneous measurements of absolute surface currents, ocean surface wind vector, and directional wave spectrum from Doppler satellite sensors.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1064  
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Author Stukel, M.R.; Ohman, M.D.; Kelly, T.B.; Biard, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Roles of Suspension-Feeding and Flux-Feeding Zooplankton as Gatekeepers of Particle Flux Into the Mesopelagic Ocean in the Northeast Pacific Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords biological pump; carbon export; remineralization length scale; mesozooplankton ecology; pteropods; marine biogeochemistry; sinking particles; marine snow  
  Abstract Zooplankton are important consumers of sinking particles in the ocean's twilight zone. However, the impact of different taxa depends on their feeding mode. In contrast to typical suspension-feeding zooplankton, flux-feeding taxa preferentially consume rapidly sinking particles that would otherwise penetrate into the deep ocean. To quantify the potential impact of two flux-feeding zooplankton taxa [Aulosphaeridae (Rhizaria), and Limacina helicina (euthecosome pteropod)] and the total suspension-feeding zooplankton community, we measured depth-stratified abundances of these organisms during six cruises in the California Current Ecosystem. Using allometric-scaling relationships, we computed the percentage of carbon flux intercepted by flux feeders and suspension feeders. These estimates were compared to direct measurements of carbon flux attenuation (CFA) made using drifting sediment traps and U-238-Th-234 disequilibrium. We found that CFA in the shallow twilight zone typically ranged from 500 to 1000 m mol organic C flux remineralized per 10-m vertical depth bin. This equated to approximately 6-10% of carbon flux remineralized/10 m. The two flux-feeding taxa considered in this study could account for a substantial proportion of this flux near the base of the euphotic zone. The mean flux attenuation attributable to Aulosphaeridae was 0.69%/10 m (median = 0.21%/10 m, interquartile range = 0.04-0.81%) at their depth of maximum abundance (similar to 100 m), which would equate to similar to 10% of total flux attenuation in this depth range. The maximum flux attenuation attributable to Aulosphaeridae reached 4.2%/10 m when these protists were most abundant. L. helicina, meanwhile, could intercept 0.45-1.6% of carbon flux/10 m, which was slightly greater (on average) than the Aulosphaeridae. In contrast, suspension-feeding zooplankton in the mesopelagic (including copepods, euphausiids, appendicularians, and ostracods) had combined clearance rates of 2-81 L m(-3) day(-1) (mean of 19.6 L m(-3) day(-1)). This implies a substantial impact on slowly sinking particles, but a negligible impact on the presumably rapidly sinking fecal pellets that comprised the majority of the material collected in sediment traps. Our results highlight the need for a greater research focus on the many taxa that potentially act as flux feeders in the oceanic twilight zone.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1066  
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Author Armstrong, E.M.; Bourassa, M.A.; Cram, T.A.; DeBellis, M.; Elya, J.; Greguska III, F.R.; Huang, T.; Jacob, J.C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; Quach, N.; McGibbney, L.; Smith, S.; Tsontos, V.M.; Wilson, B.; Worley, S.J.; Yang, C.; Yam, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Integrated Data Analytics Platform Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 354  
  Keywords  
  Abstract An Integrated Science Data Analytics Platform is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a NASA technology integration project to establish a cloud-based Integrated Ocean Science Data Analytics Platform for big ocean science at NASA’s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) for big ocean science. It focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, in situ to satellite data matchup, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery. Our communities are relying on data available through distributed data centers to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20PB of observational data during its 3-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing Earth Science data archival, distribution and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1042  
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Author Fox-Kemper, B.; Adcroft, A.; Böning, C.W.; Chassignet, E.P.; Curchitser, E.; Danabasoglu, G.; Eden, C.; England, M.H.; Gerdes, R.; Greatbatch, R.J.; Griffies, S.M.; Hallberg, R.W.; Hanert, E.; Heimbach, P.; Hewitt, H.T.; Hill, C.N.; Komuro, Y.; Legg, S.; Le Sommer, J.; Masina, S.; Marsland, S.J.; Penny, S.G.; Qiao, F.; Ringler, T.D.; Treguier, A.M.; Tsujino, H.; Uotila, P.; Yeager, S.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Southern Ocean; Overturning Circulation: Regional sea level; submesoscale; ice shelves; turbulence  
  Abstract We revisit the challenges and prospects for ocean circulation models following Griffies et al. (2010). Over the past decade, ocean circulation models evolved through improved understanding, numerics, spatial discretization, grid configurations, parameterizations, data assimilation, environmental monitoring, and process-level observations and modeling. Important large scale applications over the last decade are simulations of the Southern Ocean, the Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability, and regional sea level change. Submesoscale variability is now routinely resolved in process models and permitted in a few global models, and submesoscale effects are parameterized in most global models. The scales where nonhydrostatic effects become important are beginning to be resolved in regional and process models. Coupling to sea ice, ice shelves, and high-resolution atmospheric models has stimulated new ideas and driven improvements in numerics. Observations have provided insight into turbulence and mixing around the globe and its consequences are assessed through perturbed physics models. Relatedly, parameterizations of the mixing and overturning processes in boundary layers and the ocean interior have improved. New diagnostics being used for evaluating models alongside present and novel observations are briefly referenced. The overall goal is summarizing new developments in ocean modeling, including how new and existing observations can be used, what modeling challenges remain, and how simulations can be used to support observations.  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1011  
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Author Ahern, Kyle K. url  openurl
  Title Hurricane Boundary Layer Structure during Intensity Change: An Observational and Numerical Analysis Type $loc['typeManuscript']
  Year 2019 Publication Florida State University College of Arts and Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1103  
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Author Misra, V.; Bhardwaj, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of varying seasonal lengths of the rainy seasons of India on its teleconnections with tropical sea surface temperatures Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Atmospheric Science Letters Abbreviated Journal Atmos Sci Lett  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 9658-9689  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We present in this paper the interannual variability of seasonal temperature and rainfall in the Indian meteorological subdivisions (IMS) for boreal winter and summer seasons that take in to account the varying length of the seasons. Our study reveals that accounting for the variations in the length of the seasons produces stronger teleconnections between the seasonal anomalies of surface temperature and rainfall over India with corresponding sea surface temperature anomalies of the tropical Oceans (especially over the northern Indian and the equatorial Pacific Oceans) compared to the same teleconnections from fixed length seasons over the IMS. It should be noted that the IMS show significant spatial heterogeneity in these teleconnections.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1530-261X ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1100  
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Author Deng, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, M.; Huang, N.E.; Wang, S.; Qiao, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis to quantify the modulation of Dansgaard-Oeschger events by obliquity Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Quaternary Science Reviews Abbreviated Journal Quaternary Science Reviews  
  Volume 192 Issue Pages 282-299  
  Keywords Pleistocene; Paleoclimatology; Greenland; Antarctica; Data treatment; Data analysis; Dansgaard-oeschger (DO) events; Obliquity forcing; Phase preference; Holo-hilbert spectral analysis; Amplitude modulation; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; GREENLAND ICE-CORE; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; ABRUPT CLIMATE-CHANGE; LAST GLACIAL PERIOD; NORTH-ATLANTIC; MILLENNIAL-SCALE; RECORDS; VARIABILITY; CYCLE  
  Abstract Astronomical forcing (obliquity and precession) has been thought to modulate Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, yet the detailed quantification of such modulations has not been examined. In this study, we apply the novel Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HHSA) to five polar ice core records, quantifying astronomical forcing's time-varying amplitude modulation of DO events and identifying the preferred obliquity phases for large amplitude modulations. The unique advantages of HHSA over the widely used windowed Fourier spectral analysis for quantifying astronomical forcing's nonlinear modulations of DO events is first demonstrated with a synthetic data that closely resembles DO events recorded in Greenland ice cores (NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 cores on GICC05 modelext timescale). The analysis of paleoclimatic proxies show that statistically significantly more frequent DO events, with larger amplitude modulation in the Greenland region, tend to occur in the decreasing phase of obliquity, especially from its mean value to its minimum value. In the eastern Antarctic, although statistically significantly more DO events tend to occur in the decreasing obliquity phase in general, the preferred phase of obliquity for large amplitude modulation on DO events is a segment of the increasing phase near the maximum obliquity, implying that the physical mechanisms of DO events may be different for the two polar regions. Additionally, by using cross-spectrum and magnitude-squared analyses, Greenland DO mode at a timescale of about 1400 years leads the Antarctic DO mode at the same timescale by about 1000 years. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0277-3791 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 971  
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Author Weissman, DE; Morey, S; Bourassa, M url  doi
openurl 
  Title Studies of the effects of rain on the performance of the SMAP radiometer surface salinity estimates and applications to remote sensing of river plumes Type $loc['typeConference Article']
  Year 2017 Publication IEEE International Symposium on Geoscience and Remote Sensing IGARSS Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1491-1494  
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  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 834  
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Author Bruno-Piverger, R.E. url  openurl
  Title Applying Neural Networks to Simulate Visual Inspection of Observational Weather Data Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Florida State University College of Arts and Sciences, Master's Thesis Abbreviated Journal  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1090  
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Author Stukel, M.R.; Biard, T.; Krause, J.W.; Ohman, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Large Phaeodaria in the twilight zone: Their role in the carbon cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Carbon cycle; Ocean; Twilight zone, Rhizarian measurements; Aulosphaeridae  
  Abstract Advances in in situ imaging allow enumeration of abundant populations of large Rhizarians that compose a substantial proportion of total mesozooplankton biovolume. Using a quasi-Lagrangian sampling scheme, we quantified the abundance, vertical distributions, and sinking&#8208;related mortality of Aulosphaeridae, an abundant family of Phaeodaria in the California Current Ecosystem. Inter&#8208;cruise variability was high, with average concentrations at the depth of maximum abundance ranging from < 10 to > 300 cells m&#8722;3, with seasonal and interannual variability associated with temperature&#8208;preferences and regional shoaling of the 10°C isotherm. Vertical profiles showed that these organisms were consistently most abundant at 100&#65533;150&#8201;m depth. Average turnover times with respect to sinking were 4.7&#65533;10.9 d, equating to minimum in situ population growth rates of ~ 0.1&#65533;0.2 d&#8722;1. Using simultaneous measurements of sinking organic carbon, we find that these organisms could only meet their carbon demand if their carbon : volume ratio were ~ 1 &#956;g C mm&#8722;3. This value is substantially lower than previously used in global estimates of rhizarian biomass, but is reasonable for organisms that use large siliceous tests to inflate their cross&#8208;sectional area without a concomitant increase in biomass. We found that Aulosphaeridae alone can intercept > 20% of sinking particles produced in the euphotic zone before these particles reach a depth of 300&#8201;m. Our results suggest that the local (and likely global) carbon biomass of Aulosphaeridae, and probably the large Rhizaria overall, needs to be revised downwards, but that these organisms nevertheless play a major role in carbon flux attenuation in the twilight zone.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['yes']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 967  
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