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Author Conroy, B.J.; Steinberg, D.K.; Stukel, M.R.; Goes, J.I.; Coles, V.J.
Title Meso- and microzooplankton grazing in the Amazon River plume and western tropical North Atlantic Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal Limnol. Oceanogr.
Volume 61 Issue 3 Pages 825-840
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3590 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 74
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cornillon, P.; Adams, J.; Blumenthal, M.B.; Chassignet, E.; Davis, E.; Hankin, S.; Kinter, J.; Mendelssohn, R.; Potemra, J.; Srinivasan, A.; Sirott, J.
Title NVODS and the Development of OPeNDAP Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2009 Publication Oceanography Abbreviated Journal Oceanog.
Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 116-127
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1042-8275 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 391
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Author Cronin, M.F.; Gentemann, C.L.; Edson, J.; Ueki, I.; Bourassa, M.; Brown, S.; Clayson, C.A.; Fairall, C.W.; Farrar, J.T.; Gille, S.T.; Gulev, S.; Josey, S.A.; Kato, S.; Katsumata, M.; Kent, E.; Krug, M.; Minnett, P.J.; Parfitt, R.; Pinker, R.T.; Stackhouse Jr., P.W.; Swart, S.; Tomita, H.; Vandemark, D.; Weller, A.R.; Yoneyama, K.; Yu, L.; Zhang, D.
Title Air-Sea Fluxes With a Focus on Heat and Momentum Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Turbulent and radiative exchanges of heat between the ocean and atmosphere (hereafter heat fluxes), ocean surface wind stress, and state variables used to estimate them, are Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) influencing weather and climate. This paper describes an observational strategy for producing 3-hourly, 25-km (and an aspirational goal of hourly at 10-km) heat flux and wind stress fields over the global, ice-free ocean with breakthrough 1-day random uncertainty of 15 W m–2 and a bias of less than 5 W m–2. At present this accuracy target is met only for OceanSITES reference station moorings and research vessels (RVs) that follow best practices. To meet these targets globally, in the next decade, satellite-based observations must be optimized for boundary layer measurements of air temperature, humidity, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind stress. In order to tune and validate these satellite measurements, a complementary global in situ flux array, built around an expanded OceanSITES network of time series reference station moorings, is also needed. The array would include 500–1000 measurement platforms, including autonomous surface vehicles, moored and drifting buoys, RVs, the existing OceanSITES network of 22 flux sites, and new OceanSITES expanded in 19 key regions. This array would be globally distributed, with 1–3 measurement platforms in each nominal 10° by 10° box. These improved moisture and temperature profiles and surface data, if assimilated into Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, would lead to better representation of cloud formation processes, improving state variables and surface radiative and turbulent fluxes from these models. The in situ flux array provides globally distributed measurements and metrics for satellite algorithm development, product validation, and for improving satellite-based, NWP and blended flux products. In addition, some of these flux platforms will also measure direct turbulent fluxes, which can be used to improve algorithms for computation of air-sea exchange of heat and momentum in flux products and models. With these improved air-sea fluxes, the ocean’s influence on the atmosphere will be better quantified and lead to improved long-term weather forecasts, seasonal-interannual-decadal climate predictions, and regional climate projections.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1067
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Author Culin, J. C.
Title Wintertime ENSO Variability in Wind Direction Across the Southeast United States Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Wind Roses, Southeast United States, Surface Wind Direction, ENSO, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis
Abstract Changes in wind direction in association with the phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are identified over the Southeast region of the United States during the winter season (December-February). Wind roses, which depict the percentage of time the wind comes from each direction and can graphically identify the prevailing wind, are computed according to a 12-point compass for 24 stations in the region. Unfolding the wind rose into a 12-bin histogram visually demonstrates the peak frequencies in wind direction during each of the three (warm, cold and neutral) phases of ENSO. Normalized values represent the number of occurrences (counts) per month per ENSO phase, and comparison using percent changes illustrates the differences between phases. Based on similarities in wind direction characteristics, regional topography and results from a formal statistical test, stations are grouped into five geographic regions, with a representative station used to describe conditions in that region. Locations in South Florida show significant differences in the frequencies in wind direction from easterly directions during the cold phase and northerly directions during the warm phase. North Florida stations display cold phase southerly directions, and westerly and northerly directions during the warm phase, both of which are significant for much of the winter. Coastal Atlantic stations reveal winds from westerly directions for both phases. The Piedmont region demonstrates large variability in wind direction due to the influence from the Appalachian Mountains, but generally identifies warm phase and cold phase winds with more zonal influences rather than just from south or north. The Mountainous region also indicates southerly cold phase winds and northerly warm phase winds, but also reveals less of an influence from ENSO or significantly different distributions. Comparisons between observed patterns and those obtained using the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data reveal how the model-derived observations resolve the ENSO influence on surface wind direction at selected locations. Overall, resolution of the strength of the signals is not achieved, though the depiction of the general pattern is fair at two of the three locations. Connections between the synoptic flow and surface wind direction are examined via relationships to the storm track associated with the 250 hPa jet stream and sea level pressure patterns during each extreme ENSO phase. Discussion of reasons the NCEP reanalysis illustrates surface wind direction patterns different from those derived from observations is included.
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 615
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Author Curry, J.A.; Bentamy, A.; Bourassa, M.A.; Bourras, D.; Bradley, E.F.; Brunke, M.; Castro, S.; Chou, S.H.; Clayson, C.A.; Emery, W.J.; Eymard, L.; Fairall, C.W.; Kubota, M.; Lin, B.; Perrie, W.; Reeder, R.A.; Renfrew, I.A.; Rossow, W.B.; Schulz, J.; Smith, S.R.; Webster, P.J.; Wick, G.A.; Zeng, X.
Title Seaflux Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2004 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 85 Issue 3 Pages 409-424
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 459
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Author Danabasoglu, G.; Yeager, S.G.; Bailey, D.; Behrens, E.; Bentsen, M.; Bi, D.; Biastoch, A.; Böning, C.; Bozec, A.; Canuto, V.M.; Cassou, C.; Chassignet, E.; Coward, A.C.; Danilov, S.; Diansky, N.; Drange, H.; Farneti, R.; Fernandez, E.; Fogli, P.G.; Forget, G.; Fujii, Y.; Griffies, S.M.; Gusev, A.; Heimbach, P.; Howard, A.; Jung, T.; Kelley, M.; Large, W.G.; Leboissetier, A.; Lu, J.; Madec, G.; Marsland, S.J.; Masina, S.; Navarra, A.; George Nurser, A.J.; Pirani, A.; y Mélia, D.S.; Samuels, B.L.; Scheinert, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Treguier, A.-M.; Tsujino, H.; Uotila, P.; Valcke, S.; Voldoire, A.; Wang, Q.
Title North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2014 Publication Ocean Modelling Abbreviated Journal Ocean Modelling
Volume 73 Issue Pages 76-107
Keywords Global ocean–sea-ice modelling Ocean model comparisons Atmospheric forcing Experimental design Atlantic meridional overturning circulation North Atlantic simulations
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1463-5003 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 159
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Danabasoglu, G.; Yeager, S.G.; Kim, W.M.; Behrens, E.; Bentsen, M.; Bi, D.; Biastoch, A.; Bleck, R.; Böning, C.; Bozec, A.; Canuto, V.M.; Cassou, C.; Chassignet, E.; Coward, A.C.; Danilov, S.; Diansky, N.; Drange, H.; Farneti, R.; Fernandez, E.; Fogli, P.G.; Forget, G.; Fujii, Y.; Griffies, S.M.; Gusev, A.; Heimbach, P.; Howard, A.; Ilicak, M.; Jung, T.; Karspeck, A.R.; Kelley, M.; Large, W.G.; Leboissetier, A.; Lu, J.; Madec, G.; Marsland, S.J.; Masina, S.; Navarra, A.; Nurser, A.J.G.; Pirani, A.; Romanou, A.; Salas y Mélia, D.; Samuels, B.L.; Scheinert, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Sun, S.; Treguier, A.-M.; Tsujino, H.; Uotila, P.; Valcke, S.; Voldoire, A.; Wang, Q.; Yashayaev, I.
Title North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Ocean Modelling Abbreviated Journal Ocean Modelling
Volume 97 Issue Pages 65-90
Keywords Global ocean – sea-ice modelling; Ocean model comparisons; Atmospheric forcing; Inter-annual to decadal variability and mechanisms; Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variability; Variability in the North Atlantic
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1463-5003 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 34
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daneshgar Asl, S.; Dukhovskoy, D.S.; Bourassa, M.; MacDonald, I.R.
Title Hindcast modeling of oil slick persistence from natural seeps Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2017 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 189 Issue Pages 96-107
Keywords Natural seep; Oil slick; Green Canyon 600; Synthetic aperture radar; Surface oil drift model
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 24
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davidson, F.; Alvera-Azcárate, A.; Barth, A.; Brassington, G.B.; Chassignet, E.P.; Clementi, E.; De Mey-Frémaux, P.; Divakaran, P.; Harris, C.; Hernandez, F.; Hogan, P.; Hole, L.R.; Holt, J.; Liu, G.; Lu, Y.; Lorente, P.; Maksymczuk, J.; Martin, M.; Mehra, A.; Melsom, A.; Mo, H.; Moore, A.; Oddo, P.; Pascual, A.; Pequignet, A.-C.; Kourafalou, V.; Ryan, A.; Siddorn, J.; Smith, G.; Spindler, D.; Spindler, T.; Stanev, E.V.; Staneva, J.; Storto, A.; Tanajura, C.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Wan, L.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zu, Z.
Title Synergies in Operational Oceanography: The Intrinsic Need for Sustained Ocean Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Operational oceanography can be described as the provision of routine oceanographic information needed for decision-making purposes. It is dependent upon sustained research and development through the end-to-end framework of an operational service, from observation collection to delivery mechanisms. The core components of operational oceanographic systems are a multi-platform observation network, a data management system, a data assimilative prediction system, and a dissemination/accessibility system. These are interdependent, necessitating communication and exchange between them, and together provide the mechanism through which a clear picture of ocean conditions, in the past, present, and future, can be seen. Ocean observations play a critical role in all aspects of operational oceanography, not only for assimilation but as part of the research cycle, and for verification and validation of products. Data assimilative prediction systems are advancing at a fast pace, in tandem with improved science and the growth in computing power. To make best use of the system capability these advances would be matched by equivalent advances in operational observation coverage. This synergy between the prediction and observation systems underpins the quality of products available to stakeholders, and justifies the need for sustained ocean observations. In this white paper, the components of an operational oceanographic system are described, highlighting the critical role of ocean observations, and how the operational systems will evolve over the next decade to improve the characterization of ocean conditions, including at finer spatial and temporal scales.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1083
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davis, S.
Title Some impacts of SeaWinds data in numerical weather prediction Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 627
Permanent link to this record

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