|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Ardhuin, F.; Chapron, B.; Maes, C.; Romeiser, R.; Gommenginger, C.; Cravatte, S.; Morrow, R.; Donlon, C.; Bourassa, M.
Title Satellite Doppler observations for the motions of the oceans Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Satellite remote sensing has revolutionized oceanography, starting from sea surface temperature, ocean color, sea level, winds, waves, and the recent addition of sea surface salinity, providing a global view of upper ocean processes. The possible addition of a direct measurement of surface velocities related to currents, winds and waves opens great opportunities for research and applications.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1025
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aretxabaleta, A.; Blanton, B.O.; Seim, H.E.; Werner, F.E.; Nelson, J.R.; Chassignet, E.P.
Title Cold event in the South Atlantic Bight during summer of 2003: Model simulations and implications Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2007 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 112 Issue C5 Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 427
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.
Title The relationship between low-frequency North Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Eastern North American climate Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 626
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.
Title Indexing, Mode Definition, and Signal Extraction in Climate Research: Analysis and Applications Involving the MJO, the AO, and ENSO Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract There are two objectives of the present study. The primary objective is to undertake the following research projects involving the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO): (1) an assessment of the utility of using Cyclo-stationary empirical orthogonal function (CSEOF) analysis to define the AO, (2) an empirical analysis of ENSO impacts based on varying indicator and impact regions, (3) detection and extraction of the MJO signal from QuikSCAT, and (4) the development of a general algorithm for determining optimal filter weights for time series endpoints. A secondary objective is to enumerate the statistical and analytical treatments of the AO, ENSO, and the MJO. This will include comparisons of how these three modes are defined (including their indices) and extracted from geophysical data sets. The AO is defined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of sea level pressure north of 20'N. The resulting spatial pattern and time series captures the regional influence of its precursor, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which is a measure of mid-latitude zonal winds over the North Atlantic. ENSO was originally defined as the pressure difference between Tahiti and Darwin, Australia: the Southern Oscillation Index. Scientists now primarily use sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies averaged over one of the Ni'o regions as ENSO indices. The MJO was originally observed using spectral analysis of zonal wind time series in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific. Present day researchers use extensions of EOF analysis to construct MJO time series. For all three climate modes, the creation of high quality space-time data sets has allowed for more sophisticated indices, supplanting the simpler point-based metrics. For the AO project, the cyclo-stationarity of Northern Hemisphere sea level pressure variability is considered. CSEOF analysis is an extension of EOF analysis that allows multiple spatial maps per mode. It accomplishes this by cyclically extending the covariance matrix based on a parameter called the nested period. By using a nested period of 12, a climate mode can be decomposed into a series of 12 monthly maps and an associated time series. Unlike EOF PC time series, which typically have larger amplitudes during winter months, CSEOF PC time series do not favor a particular season because the physical evolution of the climate mode is posited in the loading vectors (the maps) rather than the time series. This is impossible to accomplish with regular EOF analysis because it relegates each mode to one single map. A compelling case is made for a cyclo-stationary interpretation of AO variability. The leading CSEOF mode includes AO-type variability during a winter regime, as well as a summer regime characterized by pressure anomalies centered over Mongolia and associated with rainfall variability in the vicinity of the Ganges delta and eastern China. EOF modes that contribute to the resulting maps of the leading CSEOF mode are identified, including the eighth mode, which is deemed responsible for the summertime Asian pattern. CSEOF analysis of the AO mode only exemplifies the power of CSEOF analysis with regard to transferring a mode's physical evolution from a PC time series to a series of loading vectors. For the ENSO project, traditional ENSO impact analysis was recast to investigate the teleconnections between U.S. climate and varying indicator regions of SST anomalies in the tropical Pacific. This serves the dual purpose of finding a targeted indicator region for a particular impact zone (i.e. a localization of the teleconnection pattern) and indirectly assessing the viability of well-established ENSO indices (i.e. the Ni'o indices). Based on a selection of impact grid points with known ENSO responses, it appears that the most appropriate indicator region often varies from one impact grid point to another, as well as from warm SST phase to cold SST phase. In addition, air temperature composites behave differently than precipitation composites. In order to simultaneously consider the 'impact perspective' detailed above with the typical 'indicator perspective' (in which climate impacts are computed based on the well-established Ni'o indices), EOF analysis of composited climate fields, conditioned on SST phase, as functions of indicator region and impact zone was performed. The resulting modes represent indicator-impact pairs. Each mode has an impact amplitude function (a spatial temperature or precipitation anomaly signature over the impact region) and an associated indicator weighting function, which modulates the impact amplitude function based on the location of the indicator region. Based on this approach, the unusual yet well-established La Ni'a air temperature impact over the U.S. when using the Ni'o 1+2 region is accounted for as the superposition of two EOF modes. In addition, a teleconnection between tropical Pacific SST and Southeastern U.S. temperature anomalies is documented that is not related to ENSO. For the MJO project, wind data from the SeaWinds instrument on the QuikSCAT satellite are investigated to ascertain how well the surface manifestation of the MJO can be resolved. The MJO signal is detected in non-filtered gridded data using Extended EOF analysis of the zonal wind field, overshadowed by annual, semi-annual, and monsoon-related modes. After bandpass filtering with Lanczos weights, MJO signals are clearly detected in several kinematic quantities, including the zonal wind speed, the zonal pseudostress, and the velocity potential. Extraction of the MJO using QuikSCAT winds compares favorably with extraction using NCEP Reanalysis 2, except that the QuikSCAT signal appears to be more robust. For the filtering project, least squares techniques are utilized to retain endpoint intervals that are normally discarded due to filtering with convolutions in the time domain. The techniques minimize the errors between the pre-determined frequency response function (FRF) of interior points with FRF's that are to be determined for each position in the endpoint zone. The least squares techniques are differentiated by their constraints: (1) unconstrained, (2) equal-mean constraint, and (3) an equal-variance constraint. The equal-mean constraint forces the new weights to sum up to the same value as the pre-determined weights. The equal-variance constraint forces the new weights to be such that, after convolved with the input values, the expected variance is identical to the expected variance of the interior points. These 3 least squares methods are tested under three separate filtering scenarios and compared to each other as well as to the spectral filtering method, which is the standard of comparison. The results indicate that all 4 methods (including the spectral method) possess skill at determining suitable endpoints estimates. However, both the unconstrained and equal-mean schemes exhibit bias toward zero near the terminal ends due to problems with appropriating variance. The equal-variance and spectral techniques do not show evidence of this attribute and were never the worst performers. The equal-variance method showed great promise in the ENSO project involving a 5-month running mean filter, and performed at least on par with the other methods for virtually all time series positions in all three filtering scenarios.
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 590
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.; Bourassa, M.A.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title Detection of the MJO Signal from QuikSCAT Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2005 Publication Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.
Volume 22 Issue 12 Pages 1885-1894
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0739-0572 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding NASA, NOAA, NSF Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 445
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.; O'Brien, J. J.; Smith, S. R.
Title The Relationship Between Low-Frequency North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperatures and Surface Temperatures over Eastern North America and Europe Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The CRCES-IRPC Workshop on Decadal Variability, NASA, NSF, and NOAA, Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 892
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.; O'Brien, J.J.; Smith, S.R.
Title Air temperature impacts over Eastern North America and Europe associated with low-frequency North Atlantic SST variability Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2009 Publication International Journal of Climatology Abbreviated Journal Int. J. Climatol.
Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 1-10
Keywords SST; North Atlantic; NAO; AMO; AO; temperature impacts
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0899-8418 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding NOAA, AMS, DynCorp Information Systems, FSU, NASA, DOE Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 398
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.; Smith, S. R.; O'Brien, J. J.
Title The relationship between low-frequency North Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Eastern North American climate Type $loc['typeReport']
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 55
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title COAPS Technical Report 02-6 Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 858
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arguez, A.; Yu, P.; O'Brien, J.J.
Title A New Method for Time Series Filtering near Endpoints Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2008 Publication Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.
Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages 534-546
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0739-0572 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 413
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P.
Title An information technology foundation for fostering interdisciplinary oceanographic research and analysis Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 1914 Data mining, INFORMATICSDE: 4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICALDE: 4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL
Abstract Before complex analysis of oceanographic or any earth science data can occur, it must be placed in the proper domain of computing and software resources. In the past this was nearly always the scientist's personal computer or institutional computer servers. The problem with this approach is that it is necessary to bring the data products directly to these compute resources leading to large data transfers and storage requirements especially for high volume satellite or model datasets. In this presentation we will present a new technological solution under development and implementation at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for conducting oceanographic and related research based on satellite data and other sources. Fundamentally, our approach for satellite resources is to tile (partition) the data inputs into cloud-optimized and computation friendly databases that allow distributed computing resources to perform on demand and server-side computation and data analytics. This technology, known as NEXUS, has already been implemented in several existing NASA data portals to support oceanographic, sea-level, and gravity data time series analysis with capabilities to output time-average maps, correlation maps, Hovmöller plots, climatological averages and more. A further extension of this technology will integrate ocean in situ observations, event-based data discovery (e.g., natural disasters), data quality screening and additional capabilities. This particular activity is an open source project known as the Apache Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) (https://sdap.apache.org), and colloquially as OceanWorks, and is funded by the NASA AIST program. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources for the researcher allowing them to focus on research results and hypothesis testing, and not be concerned with security, data preparation and management. We will present a few oceanographic and interdisciplinary use cases demonstrating the capabilities for characterizing regional sea-level rise, sea surface temperature anomalies, and ocean hurricane responses.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1004
Permanent link to this record

2000 Levy Avenue
Building A, Suite 292
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2741
Phone: (850) 644-4581
Fax: (850) 644-4841
contact@coaps.fsu.edu

© 2021 Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS)