|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Misra, V.; Selman, C.; Waite, A. J.; Bastola, S.; Mishra, A.
Title Terrestrial and Ocean Climate of the 20th Century Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
Year 2017 Publication Florida's climate: Changes, variations, & impacts Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 485-509
Keywords Seasonal cycle; Diurnal variations; Sea breeze; ENSO; Tropical cyclones; Hurricanes; AWP; AMO; PDO; PIZA
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Florida Climate Institute Place of Publication Gainesville, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P.; Jones, J. W.; Misra, V.; Obeysekera, J.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 849
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, X.; Chassignet, E.P., Wang, F.
Title On the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation transports in coupled CMIP5 simulations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn.
Volume 51 Issue 11 Pages 6511-6531
Keywords NAO-AMOC; CMIP5; NAO index; AMOC index; meridional pressure gradient; magnitude; structure change of the NAO.
Abstract The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) plays a fundamental role in the climate system, and long-term climate simulations are used to understand the AMOC variability and to assess its impact. This study examines the basic characteristics of the AMOC variability in 44 CMIP5 (Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project) simulations, using the 18 atmospherically-forced CORE-II (Phase 2 of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment) simulations as a reference. The analysis shows that on interannual and decadal timescales, the AMOC variability in the CMIP5 exhibits a similar magnitude and meridional coherence as in the CORE-II simulations, indicating that the modeled atmospheric variability responsible for AMOC variability in the CMIP5 is in reasonable agreement with the CORE-II forcing. On multidecadal timescales, however, the AMOC variability is weaker by a factor of more than 2 and meridionally less coherent in the CMIP5 than in the CORE-II simulations. The CMIP5 simulations also exhibit a weaker long-term atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). However, one cannot fully attribute the weaker AMOC variability to the weaker variability in NAO because, unlike the CORE-II simulations, the CMIP5 simulations do not exhibit a robust NAO-AMOC linkage. While the variability of the wintertime heat flux and mixed layer depth in the western subpolar North Atlantic is strongly linked to the AMOC variability, the NAO variability is not.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 981
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bruno-Piverger, R.E.
Title Applying Neural Networks to Simulate Visual Inspection of Observational Weather Data Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Florida State University College of Arts and Sciences, Master's Thesis Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1090
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sullivan, D; Murphree, T; Rosenfeld, L; Sullivan, D; Smith, S
Title Knowledge and Skill Guidelines for Marine Science and Technology: Operational Marine Forecasters Type $loc['typeMiscellaneous']
Year 2011 Publication Marine Advanced Technology Education Center Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 330
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stukel, M.R.; Biard, T.; Krause, J.W.; Ohman, M.D.
Title Large Phaeodaria in the twilight zone: Their role in the carbon cycle Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Carbon cycle; Ocean; Twilight zone, Rhizarian measurements; Aulosphaeridae
Abstract Advances in in situ imaging allow enumeration of abundant populations of large Rhizarians that compose a substantial proportion of total mesozooplankton biovolume. Using a quasi-Lagrangian sampling scheme, we quantified the abundance, vertical distributions, and sinking&#8208;related mortality of Aulosphaeridae, an abundant family of Phaeodaria in the California Current Ecosystem. Inter&#8208;cruise variability was high, with average concentrations at the depth of maximum abundance ranging from < 10 to > 300 cells m&#8722;3, with seasonal and interannual variability associated with temperature&#8208;preferences and regional shoaling of the 10°C isotherm. Vertical profiles showed that these organisms were consistently most abundant at 100&#65533;150&#8201;m depth. Average turnover times with respect to sinking were 4.7&#65533;10.9 d, equating to minimum in situ population growth rates of ~ 0.1&#65533;0.2 d&#8722;1. Using simultaneous measurements of sinking organic carbon, we find that these organisms could only meet their carbon demand if their carbon : volume ratio were ~ 1 &#956;g C mm&#8722;3. This value is substantially lower than previously used in global estimates of rhizarian biomass, but is reasonable for organisms that use large siliceous tests to inflate their cross&#8208;sectional area without a concomitant increase in biomass. We found that Aulosphaeridae alone can intercept > 20% of sinking particles produced in the euphotic zone before these particles reach a depth of 300&#8201;m. Our results suggest that the local (and likely global) carbon biomass of Aulosphaeridae, and probably the large Rhizaria overall, needs to be revised downwards, but that these organisms nevertheless play a major role in carbon flux attenuation in the twilight zone.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['yes']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 967
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hanley, DE; Jagtap, S; LaRow, TE; Jones, JW; Cocke, S; Zierden, D; O'Brien, JJ
Title The linkage of regional climate models to crop models Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2002 Publication 3rd Symposium on Environmental Applications Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 134-139
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference 3rd Symposium on Environmental Applications
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 501
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Subrahmanyam, B.; Manghanai, V.; O'Brien, J. J.; Morrison, J. M.; Xie, L.
Title A study of the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Dynamics using satellite observations and MICOM simulations Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication San Diego, California, USA Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 823
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bourassa, M. A.
Title Tehuantepec wind and pressure changes associated with tropical cyclones Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2001 Publication 11th Conference on Interactions of the Sea and Atmosphere, Amer. Meteor. Soc., San Diego, CA, USA Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 27-28
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding NASA, SEAWINDS, OVWST Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 815
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Groenen, D.; Misra, V.
Title Characterization of the Rainy Season of Mesoamerica Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Meteorological Society Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference 32nd Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 76
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, S.; Kranz, S.A.; Kelly, T.B.; Song, H.; Stukel, M.R.; Cassar, N.
Title Lagrangian Studies of Net Community Production: The Effect of Diel and Multiday Nonsteady State Factors and Vertical Fluxes on O2/Ar in a Dynamic Upwelling Region Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci.
Volume 125 Issue 6 Pages e2019JG005569
Keywords net community production; O2/Ar; California Current Ecosystem; Lagrangian measurements; vertical fluxes; nonsteady state
Abstract The ratio of dissolved oxygen to argon in seawater is frequently employed to estimate rates of net community production (NCP) in the oceanic mixed layer. The in situ O2/Ar&#8208;based method accounts for many physical factors that influence oxygen concentrations, permitting isolation of the biological oxygen signal produced by the balance of photosynthesis and respiration. However, this technique traditionally relies upon several assumptions when calculating the mixed&#8208;layer O2/Ar budget, most notably the absence of vertical fluxes of O2/Ar and the principle that the air&#8208;sea gas exchange of biological oxygen closely approximates net productivity rates. Employing a Lagrangian study design and leveraging data outputs from a regional physical oceanographic model, we conducted in situ measurements of O2/Ar in the California Current Ecosystem in spring 2016 and summer 2017 to evaluate these assumptions within a &#65533;worst&#8208;case&#65533; field environment. Quantifying vertical fluxes, incorporating nonsteady state changes in O2/Ar, and comparing NCP estimates evaluated over several day versus longer timescales, we find differences in NCP metrics calculated over different time intervals to be considerable, also observing significant potential effects from vertical fluxes, particularly advection. Additionally, we observe strong diel variability in O2/Ar and NCP rates at multiple stations. Our results reemphasize the importance of accounting for vertical fluxes when interpreting O2/Ar&#8208;derived NCP data and the potentially large effect of nonsteady state conditions on NCP evaluated over shorter timescales. In addition, diel cycles in surface O2/Ar can also bias interpretation of NCP data based on local productivity and the time of day when measurements were made.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2169-8953 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1114
Permanent link to this record

2000 Levy Avenue
Building A, Suite 292
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2741
Phone: (850) 644-4581
Fax: (850) 644-4841
contact@coaps.fsu.edu

© 2022 Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS)