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Author Proshutinsky, A.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Krishfield, R.; Bamber, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Arctic circulation regimes Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions. Series A, Mathematical, Physical, and Engineering Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci  
  Volume 373 Issue 2052 Pages  
  Keywords arctic climate variability; circulation regimes; freshwater and heat content  
  Abstract Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability.  
  Address School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-503X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:26347536; PMCID:PMC4607701 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 109  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Harris, R.; Pollman, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Landing, W.; Axelrad, D.; Morey, S.L.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Vijayaraghavan, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A screening model analysis of mercury sources, fate and bioaccumulation in the Gulf of Mexico Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2012 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 119 Issue Pages 53-63  
  Keywords Animals; Calibration; Environmental Exposure; Fishes/metabolism; Humans; Mercury/*chemistry/metabolism; *Models, Theoretical; Seawater/*chemistry; Water Pollutants, Chemical/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract A mass balance model of mercury (Hg) cycling and bioaccumulation was applied to the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf), coupled with outputs from hydrodynamic and atmospheric Hg deposition models. The dominant overall source of Hg to the Gulf is the Atlantic Ocean. Gulf waters do not mix fully however, resulting in predicted spatial differences in the relative importance of external Hg sources to Hg levels in water, sediments and biota. Direct atmospheric Hg deposition, riverine inputs, and Atlantic inputs were each predicted to be the most important source of Hg to at least one of the modeled regions in the Gulf. While incomplete, mixing of Gulf waters is predicted to be sufficient that fish Hg levels in any given location are affected by Hg entering other regions of the Gulf. This suggests that a Gulf-wide approach is warranted to reduce Hg loading and elevated Hg concentrations currently observed in some fish species. Basic data to characterize Hg concentrations and cycling in the Gulf are lacking but needed to adequately understand the relationship between Hg sources and fish Hg concentrations.  
  Address Reed Harris Environmental Ltd., 180 Forestwood Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J4E6, Canada. reed@reed-harris.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:23102631 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 234  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Harris, R.; Pollman, C.; Landing, W.; Evans, D.; Axelrad, D.; Hutchinson, D.; Morey, S.L.; Rumbold, D.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Adams, D.H.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Holmes, C.; Atkinson, R.D.; Myers, T.; Sunderland, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mercury in the Gulf of Mexico: sources to receptors Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2012 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 119 Issue Pages 42-52  
  Keywords Air Pollutants/chemistry; Animals; Environmental Exposure; Food Chain; Geologic Sediments/chemistry; Humans; Mercury/*chemistry/metabolism; Seawater/*chemistry; Water Pollutants, Chemical/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) fisheries account for 41% of the U.S. marine recreational fish catch and 16% of the nation's marine commercial fish landings. Mercury (Hg) concentrations are elevated in some fish species in the Gulf, including king mackerel, sharks, and tilefish. All five Gulf states have fish consumption advisories based on Hg. Per-capita fish consumption in the Gulf region is elevated compared to the U.S. national average, and recreational fishers in the region have a potential for greater MeHg exposure due to higher levels of fish consumption. Atmospheric wet Hg deposition is estimated to be higher in the Gulf region compared to most other areas in the U.S., but the largest source of Hg to the Gulf as a whole is the Atlantic Ocean (>90%) via large flows associated with the Loop Current. Redistribution of atmospheric, Atlantic and terrestrial Hg inputs to the Gulf occurs via large scale water circulation patterns, and further work is needed to refine estimates of the relative importance of these Hg sources in terms of contributing to fish Hg levels in different regions of the Gulf. Measurements are needed to better quantify external loads, in-situ concentrations, and fluxes of total Hg and methylmercury in the water column, sediments, and food web.  
  Address Reed Harris Environmental Ltd, 180 Forestwood Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J4E6, Canada. reed@reed-harris.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:23098613 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 233  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Powell, M.D.; Cocke, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Hurricane wind fields needed to assess risk to offshore wind farms Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2012 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 109 Issue 33 Pages E2192; author reply E2193-4  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:22829670; PMCID:PMC3421164 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 241  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, D.K.; McGillicuddy, D.J.J.; Zamudio, L.; Thurnherr, A.M.; Liang, X.; Rouxel, O.; German, C.R.; Mullineaux, L.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Surface-generated mesoscale eddies transport deep-sea products from hydrothermal vents Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 332 Issue 6029 Pages 580-583  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Atmospheric forcing, which is known to have a strong influence on surface ocean dynamics and production, is typically not considered in studies of the deep sea. Our observations and models demonstrate an unexpected influence of surface-generated mesoscale eddies in the transport of hydrothermal vent efflux and of vent larvae away from the northern East Pacific Rise. Transport by these deep-reaching eddies provides a mechanism for spreading the hydrothermal chemical and heat flux into the deep-ocean interior and for dispersing propagules hundreds of kilometers between isolated and ephemeral communities. Because the eddies interacting with the East Pacific Rise are formed seasonally and are sensitive to phenomena such as El Nino, they have the potential to introduce seasonal to interannual atmospheric variations into the deep sea.  
  Address Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. dadams@whoi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:21527710 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 307  
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Author Zeng, H.; Chambers, J.Q.; Negron-Juarez, R.I.; Hurtt, G.C.; Baker, D.B.; Powell, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impacts of tropical cyclones on U.S. forest tree mortality and carbon flux from 1851 to 2000 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2009 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 106 Issue 19 Pages 7888-7892  
  Keywords Biodiversity; Biomass; Carbon; *Cyclonic Storms; Ecosystem; Greenhouse Effect; Models, Statistical; Southeastern United States; *Trees; United States  
  Abstract Tropical cyclones cause extensive tree mortality and damage to forested ecosystems. A number of patterns in tropical cyclone frequency and intensity have been identified. There exist, however, few studies on the dynamic impacts of historical tropical cyclones at a continental scale. Here, we synthesized field measurements, satellite image analyses, and empirical models to evaluate forest and carbon cycle impacts for historical tropical cyclones from 1851 to 2000 over the continental U.S. Results demonstrated an average of 97 million trees affected each year over the entire United States, with a 53-Tg annual biomass loss, and an average carbon release of 25 Tg y(-1). Over the period 1980-1990, released CO(2) potentially offset the carbon sink in forest trees by 9-18% over the entire United States. U.S. forests also experienced twice the impact before 1900 than after 1900 because of more active tropical cyclones and a larger extent of forested areas. Forest impacts were primarily located in Gulf Coast areas, particularly southern Texas and Louisiana and south Florida, while significant impacts also occurred in eastern North Carolina. Results serve as an important baseline for evaluating how potential future changes in hurricane frequency and intensity will impact forest tree mortality and carbon balance.  
  Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, 400 Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA. hzeng@tulane.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:19416842; PMCID:PMC2683102 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 658  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jones, W.B.; O'Brien, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pseudo-spectral methods and linear instabilities in reaction-diffusion fronts Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 1996 Publication Chaos (Woodbury, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Chaos  
  Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages 219-228  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We explore the application of a pseudo-spectral Fourier method to a set of reaction-diffusion equations and compare it with a second-order finite difference method. The prototype cubic autocatalytic reaction-diffusion model as discussed by Gray and Scott [Chem. Eng. Sci. 42, 307 (1987)] with a nonequilibrium constraint is adopted. In a spatial resolution study we find that the phase speeds of one-dimensional finite amplitude waves converge more rapidly for the spectral method than for the finite difference method. Furthermore, in two dimensions the symmetry preserving properties of the spectral method are shown to be superior to those of the finite difference method. In studies of plane/axisymmetric nonlinear waves a symmetry breaking linear instability is shown to occur and is one possible route for the formation of patterns from infinitesimal perturbations to finite amplitude waves in this set of reaction-diffusion equations. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics.  
  Address Advanced Systems Division, Silicon Graphics Inc., Mountain View, California 94043-1389COAPS, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-3041  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1054-1500 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding PMID:12780250 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 714  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, Z.; Chassignet, E.P.; Ji, F.; Huang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reply to 'Spatiotemporal patterns of warming' Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2014 Publication Nature Climate Change Abbreviated Journal Nature Climate change  
  Volume 4 Issue 10 Pages 846-848  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-678X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 151  
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Author Ji, F.; Wu, Z.; Huang, J.; Chassignet, E.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evolution of land surface air temperature trend Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2014 Publication Nature Climate Change Abbreviated Journal Nature Climate change  
  Volume 4 Issue 6 Pages 462-466  
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  ISSN 1758-678X ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 131  
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Author Misra, V.; Mishra, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Viswanthan, K.; Schmutz, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The potential role of land cover on secular changes of the hydroclimate of Peninsular Florida Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Climate and Atmospheric Science Abbreviated Journal Clim Atmos Sci  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2397-3722 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 833  
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