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Author Neto, A.G.; Palter, J.; Bower, A.; Furey, H.; Xu. X. doi  openurl
  Title Labrador Sea Water transport across the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans  
  Volume Accepted Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Labrador Sea Water (LSW) is a major component of the deep limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, yet LSW transport pathways and their variability lack a complete description. A portion of the LSW exported from the subpolar gyre is advected eastward along the North Atlantic Current and must contend with the Mid‐Atlantic Ridge before reaching the eastern basins of the North Atlantic. Here, we analyze observations from a mooring array and satellite altimetry, together with outputs from a hindcast ocean model simulation, to estimate the mean transport of LSW across the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ), a primary gateway for the eastward transport of the water mass. The LSW transport estimated from the 25‐year altimetry record is 5.3 ± 2.9 Sv, where the error represents the combination of observational variability and the uncertainty in the projection of the surface velocities to the LSW layer. Current velocities modulate the interannual to higher frequency variability of the LSW transport at the CGFZ, while the LSW thickness becomes important on longer time scales. The modeled mean LSW transport for 1993‐2012 is higher than the estimate from altimetry, at 8.2 ± 4.1 Sv. The modeled LSW thickness decreases substantially at the CGFZ between 1996 and 2009, consistent with an observed decline in LSW volume in the Labrador Sea after 1994. We suggest that satellite altimetry and continuous hydrographic measurements in the central Labrador Sea, supplemented by profiles from Argo floats, could be sufficient to quantify the LSW transport at the CGFZ.  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1108  
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Author Kelly, T.B.; Davison, P.C.; Goericke, R.; Landry, M.R.; Ohman, M.D.; Stukel, M,R. doi  openurl
  Title The Importance of Mesozooplankton Diel Vertical Migration for Sustaining a Mesopelagic Food Web Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication FRONTIERS IN MARINE SCIENCE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We used extensive ecological and biogeochemical measurements obtained from quasi-Lagrangian experiments during two California Current Ecosystem Long-Term Ecosystem Research cruises to analyze carbon fluxes between the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones using a linear inverse ecosystem model (LIEM). Measurement constraints on the model include C-14 primary productivity, dilution-based microzooplankton grazing rates, gut pigment-based mesozooplankton grazing rates (on multiple zooplankton size classes), Th-234:U-238 disequilibrium and sediment trap measured carbon export, and metabolic requirements of micronekton, zooplankton, and bacteria. A likelihood approach (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) was used to estimate the resulting flow uncertainties from a sample of potential flux networks. Results highlight the importance of mesozooplankton active transport (i.e., diel vertical migration) in supplying the carbon demand of mesopelagic organisms and sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In nine water parcels ranging from a coastal bloom to offshore oligotrophic conditions, mesozooplankton active transport accounted for 18-84% (median: 42%) of the total carbon transfer to the mesopelagic, with gravitational settling of POC (12-55%; median: 37%), and subduction (2-32%; median: 14%) providing the majority of the remainder. Vertically migrating zooplankton contributed to downward carbon flux through respiration and excretion at depth and via mortality losses to predatory zooplankton and mesopelagic fish (e.g., myctophids and gonostomatids). Sensitivity analyses showed that the results of the LIEM were robust to changes in nekton metabolic demand, rates of bacterial production, and mesozooplankton gross growth efficiency. This analysis suggests that prior estimates of zooplankton active transport based on conservative estimates of standard (rather than active) metabolism are likely too low.  
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  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1084  
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Author Stukel, M.R.; Decima, M.; Kelly, T.B. doi  openurl
  Title A new approach for incorporating 15N isotopic data into linear inverse ecosystem models with Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages e0199123  
  Keywords Isotopic data; Nitrogen-based ecosystem models; Phytoplankton; Defecation by grazers; Mortality by phytoplankton  
  Abstract Oceanographic field programs often use delta15N biogeochemical measurements and in situ rate measurements to investigate nitrogen cycling and planktonic ecosystem structure. However, integrative modeling approaches capable of synthesizing these distinct measurement types are lacking. We develop a novel approach for incorporating delta15N isotopic data into existing Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) random walk methods for solving linear inverse ecosystem models. We test the ability of this approach to recover food web indices (nitrate uptake, nitrogen fixation, zooplankton trophic level, and secondary production) derived from forward models simulating the planktonic ecosystems of the California Current and Amazon River Plume. We show that the MCMC with delta15N approach typically does a better job of recovering ecosystem structure than the standard MCMC or L2 minimum norm (L2MN) approaches, and also outperforms an L2MN with delta15N approach. Furthermore, we find that the MCMC with delta15N approach is robust to the removal of input equations and hence is well suited to typical pelagic ecosystem studies for which the system is usually vastly under-constrained. Our approach is easily extendable for use with delta13C isotopic measurements or variable carbon:nitrogen stoichiometry.  
  Address Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('2').strtolower('9912928'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC6005467') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 975  
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Author Coles, V.J.; Stukel, M.R.; Brooks, M.T.; Burd, A.; Crump, B.C.; Moran, M.A.; Paul, J.H.; Satinsky, B.M.; Yager, P.L.; Zielinski, B.L.; Hood, R.R. doi  openurl
  Title Ocean biogeochemistry modeled with emergent trait-based genomics Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2017 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 358 Issue 6367 Pages 1149-1154  
  Keywords Atlantic Ocean; Biochemical Phenomena/genetics; Metabolic Networks and Pathways/*genetics; Metagenome; *Metagenomics; Microbial Consortia/*genetics; Models, Biological; Seawater/*microbiology; Transcriptome  
  Abstract Marine ecosystem models have advanced to incorporate metabolic pathways discovered with genomic sequencing, but direct comparisons between models and “omics” data are lacking. We developed a model that directly simulates metagenomes and metatranscriptomes for comparison with observations. Model microbes were randomly assigned genes for specialized functions, and communities of 68 species were simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. Unfit organisms were replaced, and the model self-organized to develop community genomes and transcriptomes. Emergent communities from simulations that were initialized with different cohorts of randomly generated microbes all produced realistic vertical and horizontal ocean nutrient, genome, and transcriptome gradients. Thus, the library of gene functions available to the community, rather than the distribution of functions among specific organisms, drove community assembly and biogeochemical gradients in the model ocean.  
  Address Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), Post Office Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('2').strtolower('9191900') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 989  
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Author Maksimova, E.V. doi  openurl
  Title A conceptual view on inertial internal waves in relation to the subinertial flow on the central west Florida shelf Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 15952  
  Keywords GRAVITY-WAVES; HARMONIC-ANALYSIS; OCEAN; GENERATION; PATHWAYS; SPECTRUM  
  Abstract The study reported here focuses on inertial internal wave currents on the west Florida midshelf in 50 m depth. In situ observations showed that the seasonal shifts in stratification change both the frequency range of inertial internal waves and their modulation time scales. According to the analysis, the subinertial flow evolution time scales also undergo compatible seasonal variations, and the inertial internal wave currents appear to be temporally and spatially related to the subinertial flow. Specifically, the subinertial flow evolving on frontal-/quasi-geostrophic time scales appears to be accompanied by the near-inertial oscillations/inertia-gravity waves in corresponding small/finite Burger number regimes, respectively. The quasi-geostrophic subinertial currents on the west Florida shelf are probably associated with the synoptic wind-forced flow, whereas the frontal-geostrophic currents are related to the evolution of density fronts. Further details of this conceptual view should, however, be elucidated in the future.  
  Address Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306, USA. evm07c@my.fsu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding 0374060PMC6206015 Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 982  
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Author Venugopal, T.; Ali, M.M.; Bourassa, M.A.; Zheng, Y.; Goni, G.J.; Foltz, G.R.; Rajeevan, M. doi  openurl
  Title Statistical Evidence for the Role of Southwestern Indian Ocean Heat Content in the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication SCIENTIFIC REPORTS Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 12092  
  Keywords SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURE; EL-NINO; EQUATORIAL PACIFIC; IMPACT; PREDICTION; ENSO; DIPOLE; REGION; SST  
  Abstract This study examines the benefit of using Ocean Mean Temperature (OMT) to aid in the prediction of the sign of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) anomalies. This is a statistical examination, rather than a process study. The thermal energy needed for maintaining and intensifying hurricanes and monsoons comes from the upper ocean, not just from the thin layer represented by sea surface temperature (SST) alone. Here, we show that the southwestern Indian OMT down to the depth of the 26 degrees C isotherm during January-March is a better qualitative predictor of the ISMR than SST. The success rate in predicting above- or below-average ISMR is 80% for OMT compared to 60% for SST. Other January-March mean climate indices (e.g., NINO3.4, Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index, El Nino Southern Oscillation Modoki Index) have less predictability (52%, 48%, and 56%, respectively) than OMT percentage deviation (PD) (80%). Thus, OMT PD in the southwestern Indian Ocean provides a better qualitative prediction of ISMR by the end of March and indicates whether the ISMR will be above or below the climatological mean value.  
  Address Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, New Delhi, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('0108244'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC6092415') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 972  
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Author Zou, S.; Bower, A.; Furey, H.; Susan Lozier, M.; Xu, X. doi  openurl
  Title Redrawing the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water pathways in the North Atlantic Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2020 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 1890  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) is a primary deep water mass exported from the Norwegian Sea into the North Atlantic as part of the global Meridional Overturning Circulation. ISOW has historically been depicted as flowing counter-clockwise in a deep boundary current around the subpolar North Atlantic, but this single-boundary-following pathway is being challenged by new Lagrangian observations and model simulations. We show here that ISOW leaves the boundary and spreads into the interior towards the central Labrador and Irminger basins after flowing through the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone. We also describe a newly observed southward pathway of ISOW along the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The partitioning of these pathways is shown to be influenced by deep-reaching eddies and meanders of the North Atlantic Current. Our results, in tandem with previous studies, call for a revision in the historical depiction of ISOW pathways throughout the North Atlantic.  
  Address Center for Ocean-Atmosphere Prediction Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('2313002'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC7170894') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1105  
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Author Proshutinsky, A.; Krishfield, R.; Toole, J.M.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W.; Zimmermann, S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Armitage, T.W.K.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Golubeva, E.; Manucharyan, G.E.; Platov, G.; Watanabe, E.; Kikuchi, T.; Nishino, S.; Itoh, M.; Kang, S.-H.; Cho, K.-H.; Tateyama, K.; Zhao, J. doi  openurl
  Title Analysis of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Content in 2003-2018 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Geophys Res Oceans  
  Volume 124 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Gyre; circulation; climate change; freshwater balance; modeling  
  Abstract Hydrographic data collected from research cruises, bottom-anchored moorings, drifting Ice-Tethered Profilers, and satellite altimetry in the Beaufort Gyre region of the Arctic Ocean document an increase of more than 6,400 km(3) of liquid freshwater content from 2003 to 2018: a 40% growth relative to the climatology of the 1970s. This fresh water accumulation is shown to result from persistent anticyclonic atmospheric wind forcing (1997-2018) accompanied by sea ice melt, a wind-forced redirection of Mackenzie River discharge from predominantly eastward to westward flow, and a contribution of low salinity waters of Pacific Ocean origin via Bering Strait. Despite significant uncertainties in the different observations, this study has demonstrated the synergistic value of having multiple diverse datasets to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Beaufort Gyre freshwater content variability. For example, Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) surveys clearly show the interannual increase in freshwater content, but without satellite or Ice-Tethered Profiler measurements, it is not possible to resolve the seasonal cycle of freshwater content, which in fact is larger than the year-to-year variability, or the more subtle interannual variations.  
  Address Physical Oceanography Laboratory Ocean University of China, Qingdao China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('2055432'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC7003849') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1097  
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Author Proshutinsky, A.; Krishfield, R.; Toole, J.M.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W.; Zimmermann, S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Armitage, T.W.K.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Golubeva, E.; Manucharyan, G.E.; Platov, G.; Watanabe, E.; Kikuchi, T.; Nishino, S.; Itoh, M.; Kang, S.-H.; Cho, K.-H.; Tateyama, K.; Zhao, J. doi  openurl
  Title Analysis of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Content in 2003-2018 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Geophys Res Oceans  
  Volume 124 Issue 12 Pages 9658-9689  
  Keywords Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Gyre; circulation; climate change; freshwater balance; modeling  
  Abstract Hydrographic data collected from research cruises, bottom-anchored moorings, drifting Ice-Tethered Profilers, and satellite altimetry in the Beaufort Gyre region of the Arctic Ocean document an increase of more than 6,400 km(3) of liquid freshwater content from 2003 to 2018: a 40% growth relative to the climatology of the 1970s. This fresh water accumulation is shown to result from persistent anticyclonic atmospheric wind forcing (1997-2018) accompanied by sea ice melt, a wind-forced redirection of Mackenzie River discharge from predominantly eastward to westward flow, and a contribution of low salinity waters of Pacific Ocean origin via Bering Strait. Despite significant uncertainties in the different observations, this study has demonstrated the synergistic value of having multiple diverse datasets to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Beaufort Gyre freshwater content variability. For example, Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) surveys clearly show the interannual increase in freshwater content, but without satellite or Ice-Tethered Profiler measurements, it is not possible to resolve the seasonal cycle of freshwater content, which in fact is larger than the year-to-year variability, or the more subtle interannual variations.  
  Address Physical Oceanography Laboratory Ocean University of China, Qingdao China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding strtoupper('3').strtolower('2055432'); strtoupper('P').strtolower('MC7003849') Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1102  
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Author Hurlburt, H. E.; Chassignet, E. P.; Cummings, J. A.; Kara, A. B.; Metzger, E. J.; Shriver, J. F.; Smedstad, O. M.; Wallcraft, A. J.; Barron, C. N. doi  openurl
  Title Eddy-Resolving Global Ocean Prediction Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
  Year 2008 Publication Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime Abbreviated Journal  
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  Publisher Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor Hecht, M. W.; Hasumi, H.  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 694  
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