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Author O'hara, S. H.; Arko, R. A.; Clark, D.; Chandler, C. L.; Elya, J. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; McLain, K.; Olson, C. J.; Sellers, C. J.; Smith, S. R.; Stocks, K. I.; Stolp, L.; Carbotte, S. M. url  openurl
  Title Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program Data Services for the Oceanographic Research Community Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018 Issue Pages  
  Keywords OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL  
  Abstract Research vessels supported by NSF are critical platforms contributing to academic oceanographic research in the US. The “underway” data sets obtained from the continuously operating geophysical, water column, and meteorological sensors aboard these vessels provide characterization of basic environmental conditions for the oceans and are of high scientific value for building global syntheses, climatologies, and historical time series of ocean properties (e.g the World Ocean Atlas, the GMRT bathymetric synthesis, ICOADS). The Rolling deck to Repository program (www.rvdata.us) provides a central shore-side data gateway that ensures the basic documentation, assessment and submission of all environmental data from ship operators to the NOAA long-term archives for these data. R2R provides a set of data services for the oceanographic research community, including: publishing an online, searchable and browsable master cruise catalog, supported by cruise and data set DOIs; organizing, archiving, and disseminating original underway data and documents; assessing data quality on select data types; creating select post-field data products; and supporting at-sea event logging. In this presentation we will discuss new developments in R2R data services and challenges associated with ship-based data management. A significant challenge is the dramatic increase in data volumes associated with new sensors (e.g. the EK80 Sonar systems) whereby individual cruise distributions can be several terabytes. Ship operators, R2R and NCEI must design a way to move and store these growing volumes. R2R is also working to make information more accessible and complete. A new website has been launched along with API web services that allow users to find and use data more easily. R2R is working to improve device metadata, including working to identify the time sources for all environmental sensors to support accurate comparison and merging of data sets.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1020  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zheng, Y.; Bourassa, M. A.; Dukhovskoy, D. S. url  openurl
  Title Upper-Ocean Processes Controlling the Sea Surface Temperature in the Western Gulf of Mexico Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages  
  Keywords 4299 General or miscellaneous, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL  
  Abstract This study examines the upper-ocean processes controlling the mixed layer temperature in the western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) through estimating the contributing terms in the heat equation, with an emphasis on eddies' role. The major heat contributing terms for the upper GOM were estimated using two ocean reanalysis datasets: an eddy-resolving HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA). Analysis of net surface heat fluxes from four datasets reveals that the long-term mean net surface heat flux cools the northern GOM and warms the southern GOM. Two regions are focused for analysis: an eddy-rich region where LCEs are energetic, and the southwestern Gulf where eddy activity is relatively weak and the features of near surface temperature differ from the eddy-rich region. An eddy-rich region in the western GOM is defined based on the eddy kinetic energy derived from satellite sea surface heights. The long-term mean horizontal heat advection causes a weak warming over most of the eddy rich region, partly attributed to the flow-temperature configuration that the long-term and seasonally mean flow is nearly parallel to the corresponding mean isotherms. By contrast, the temporal mean vertical heat advection causes a strong warming in the eddy rich region, partly balancing the cooling caused by net surface heat flux. The temporal mean eddy heat flux convergence in the western GOM, whose positive and negative values are not small at some locations, appears heterogeneous in space, resulting in a small term for the western GOM when area averaged. The persistent warm water in the southwestern Gulf is primarily caused by the net warming from net surface heat flux rather than from eddies and heat advection.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1007  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jacob, J. C.; Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P. url  openurl
  Title OceanWorks: Enabling Interactive Oceanographic Analysis in the Cloud with Multivariate Data Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages  
  Keywords 910 Data assimilation, integration and fusion, INFORMATICSDE: 1916 Data and information discovery, INFORMATICSDE: 1926 Geospatial, INFORMATICSDE: 1942 Machine learning, INFORMATICS  
  Abstract NASA's Advanced Information System Technology (AIST) Program sponsors the OceanWorks project to establish an integrated data analytics center at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC). OceanWorks provides a series of interoperable capabilities that are essential for cloud-scale oceanographic research. These include big data analytics, data search with subsecond response, intelligent ranking of search results, subsetting based on data quality metrics, and rapid spatiotemporal matchup of satellite measurements with distributed in situ data. The software behind OceanWorks is being developed as an open source project in the Apache Incubator Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP – http://sdap.apache.org). In this presentation we describe how OceanWorks enables efficient, scalable, interactive and interdisciplinary oceanographic analysis with multivariate data.

Interactivity is enabled by a number of SDAP features. First, SDAP provides Representational State Transfer (REST) interfaces to a number of built-in cloud analytics to compute time series, time-averaged maps, correlation maps, climatological maps, Hovmöller maps, and more. To access these, users simply navigate to a properly constructed parameterized URL in their web browser or issue web services calls in a variety of programming languages or in a Jupyter notebook. Alternatively, Python clients can make function calls via the NEXUS Command Line Interface (CLI). Authenticated users can even inject their own custom code via REST calls or the CLI.

To enable interdisciplinary science, OceanWorks provides access to a rich collection of multivariate satellite and in situ measurements of the oceans (e.g., sea surface temperature, height and salinity, chlorophyll and circulation) and other Earth science data (e.g., aerosol optical depth and wind speed), coupled with on-demand processing capabilities close to the data. We partition the data across space or time into tiles and store them into cloud-aware databases that are collocated with the computations. We will provide examples of scientific studies directly enabled by OceanWorks' multivariate data and cloud analytics.
 
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1005  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Buchanan, S.; Misra, V.; Bhardwaj, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title https://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/joc.5450 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Climatology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue 6 Pages 2651-2661  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The integrated kinetic energy (IKE) of a tropical cyclone (TC), a volume integration of the surface winds around the centre of the TC, is computed from a comprehensive surface wind (National Aeronautics and Space Administrationís (NASA) cross‐calibrated multi‐platform [CCMP]) analysis available over the global oceans to verify against IKE from wind radii estimates of extended best‐track data maintained by NOAA for the North Atlantic TCs. It is shown that CCMP surface wind analysis severely underestimates IKE largely from not resolving hurricane force winds for majority of the Atlantic TCs, under sampling short‐lived and small‐sized TCs. The seasonal cycle of the North Atlantic TC IKE also verifies poorly in the CCMP analysis. In this article we introduce proxy IKE (PIKE) based on the kinetic energy of the winds at the radius of the last closed isobar (ROCI), which shows promise for a wide range of TC sizes including the smaller‐sized TCs unresolved in the CCMP data set.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kumar, V.; Jana, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Deepa, R.; Sahu, S.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Sirdas, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Greenhouse Gas Emission, Rainfall and Crop Production Over North-Western India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication The Open Ecology Journal Abbreviated Journal TOECOLJ  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 47-61  
  Keywords Greenhouse gases, CH4, Climate Variability, Emissions, Crop production, Rainfall.  
  Abstract Background:

This study is based on datasets acquired from multi sources e.g. rain-gauges, satellite, reanalysis and coupled model for the region of Northwestern India. The influence of rainfall on crop production is obvious and direct. With the climate change and global warming, greenhouse gases are also showing an adverse impact on crop production. Greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2, NO2 and CH4) have shown an increasing trend over Northwestern Indian region. In recent years, rainfall has also shown an increasing trend over Northwestern India, while the production of rice and maize are reducing over the region. From eight selected sites, over Northwestern India, where rice and maize productions have reduced by 40%, with an increase in CO2, NO2 and CH4 gas emission by 5% from 1998 to 2011.

Results:

The correlation from one year to another between rainfall, gas emission and crop production was not very robust throughout the study period, but seemed to be stronger for some years than others.

Conclusion:

Such trends and crop yield are attributed to rainfall, greenhouse gas emissions and to the climate variability.
 
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1874-2130 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1017  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kelly, T.B.; Goericke, R.; Kahru, M.; Song, H.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CCE II: Spatial and interannual variability in export efficiency and the biological pump in an eastern boundary current upwelling system with substantial lateral advection Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 140 Issue Pages 14-25  
  Keywords CALIFORNIA CURRENT ECOSYSTEM; OCEAN CARBON-CYCLE; COASTAL WATERS; FRONTAL ZONE; TIME-SERIES; FLUX; SINKING; SEA; PACIFIC; ZOOPLANKTON  
  Abstract Estimating interannual variability in carbon export is a key goal of many marine biogeochemical studies. However, due to variations in export mechanisms between regions, generalized models used to estimate global patterns in export often fail when used for intra-regional analysis. We present here a region-specific model of export production for the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) parameterized using intensive Lagrangian process studies conducted during El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm and neutral phases by the CCE Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program. We find that, contrary to expectations from prominent global algorithms, export efficiency (e-ratio = export / primary productivity) is positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with net primary productivity (NPP). We attribute these results to the substantial horizontal advection found within the region, and verify this assumption by using a Lagrangian particle tracking model to estimate water mass age. We further suggest that sinking particles in the CCE are comprised of a recently-produced, rapidly-sinking component (likely mesozooplankton fecal pellets) and a longer-lived, slowly-sinking component that is likely advected long distances prior to export. We determine a new algorithm for estimating particle export in the CCE from NPP (Export = 0.08 · NPP + 72 mg C m-2 d-1). We apply this algorithm to a two-decade long time series of NPP in the CCE to estimate spatial and interannual variability across multiple ENSO phases. Reduced export during the warm anomaly of 2014-2015 and El Niño 2015-2016 resulted primarily from decreased export in the coastal upwelling region of the CCE; the oligotrophic offshore region exhibited comparatively low seasonal and interannual variability in flux. The model resolves intra-regional patterns of in situ export measurements, and provides a valuable contrast to global export models.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 984  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kelly, T.B.; Goericke, R.; Kahru, M.; Song, H.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CCE II: Spatial and interannual variability in export efficiency and the biological pump in an eastern boundary current upwelling system with substantial lateral advection Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 140 Issue Pages 14-25  
  Keywords california current ecosystem; coastal waters; flux; frontal zone; ocean carbon-cycle; oceanography; pacific; sea; sinking; time-series; Zooplankton  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1022  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 140 Issue Pages 52-62  
  Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system KeyWords Plus:ZOOPLANKTON FECAL PELLETS; NORTH PACIFIC-OCEAN; CURRENT SYSTEM; SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA; UNDERWATER GLIDERS; CARBON EXPORT; ZONE; CHLOROPHYLL; STABILITY; EQUATIONS  
  Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014-2015) followed by an El Nino (2015-2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Nino 2016 – and three cruises during El Ninoneutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, massspecific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 983  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system  
  Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014�2015) followed by an El Niño (2015�2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Niño 2016 � and three cruises during El Niño-neutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, mass-specific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention  
  Address Deep-Sea Research Part I  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 966  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 140 Issue Pages 52-62  
  Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system  
  Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014-2015) followed by an El Nino (2015-2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Nino 2016 – and three cruises during El Ninoneutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, massspecific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1021  
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