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Author Guerra, L.A.A.; Paiva, A.M.; Chassignet, E.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On the translation of Agulhas rings to the western South Atlantic Ocean Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 139 Issue Pages 104-113  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The shedding of Agulhas rings is the primary process connecting the Indian and Atlantic oceans. The rings transport warm and salty waters that feed the surface limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Early studies suggest that Agulhas rings decay and diffuse their contents within the South Atlantic subtropical gyre. In this paper, we update the ring census using an automated algorithm to detect and track eddies over more than 23 years of satellite altimetry data (1993-2016) and calculate their main characteristics. While 140 rings spawned from the Agulhas Retroflection, their following splitting and merging resulted in 74 long-lived rings that crossed the Walvis Ridge and translated towards the west. Eventually, three rings reached the western boundary. For one of them, we use in situ measurements to document its interaction with the Brazil Current and two cyclonic eddies, which resulted in a current velocity increase by three times. Although already hypothesized, this interaction had not been demonstrated with in situ evidence until now.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 994  
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Author Kumar, V.; Jana, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Deepa, R.; Sahu, S.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Sirdas, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Greenhouse Gas Emission, Rainfall and Crop Production Over North-Western India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication The Open Ecology Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 47-61  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: This study is based on datasets acquired from multi sources e.g. rain-gauges, satellite, reanalysis and coupled model for the region of Northwestern India. The influence of rainfall on crop production is obvious and direct. With the climate change and global warming, greenhouse gases are also showing an adverse impact on crop production. Greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2, NO2 and CH4) have shown an increasing trend over Northwestern Indian region. In recent years, rainfall has also shown an increasing trend over Northwestern India, while the production of rice and maize are reducing over the region. From eight selected sites, over Northwestern India, where rice and maize productions have reduced by 40%, with an increase in CO2, NO2 and CH4 gas emission by 5% from 1998 to 2011. Results: The correlation from one year to another between rainfall, gas emission and crop production was not very robust throughout the study period, but seemed to be stronger for some years than others. Conclusion: Such trends and crop yield are attributed to rainfall, greenhouse gas emissions and to the climate variability.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1874-2130 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1024  
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Author Krishnamurti, T. N.; Karmakar, Nirupam; Misra, Vasubandhu; Nag, Bappaditya; Sahu, Dipak; Dubey, Sarvesh; Haddad, Ziad url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between upper level diffluence in the Tropical Easterly Jet and the formation of the strongest Atlantic hurricanes in recent years Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of SPIE Abbreviated Journal SPIE  
  Volume 10782 Issue Pages 10  
  Keywords  
  Abstract In this paper we report the evidence of the potential role of diffluence in the 200hPa wind field off the coast of West Africa in the formation of a significant number of Category 4 and Category 5 hurricanes in the recent decade. It is shown that more than 80% cases of hurricanes at Category 4 and above is preceded by upper level diffluence in the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) by 0{5 days. This TEJ is the outflow from the southern flank of the Tibetan anticyclone from the Asian monsoon region.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 1000  
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Author Groenen, D. url  openurl
  Title The Effects of Climate Change on the Pests and Diseases of Coffee Crops in Mesoamerica Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Climatology & Weather Forecasting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Coffee; Pests and diseases; Mesoamerica; Climate  
  Abstract Coffee is an in-demand commodity that is being threatened by climate change. Increasing temperatures and rainfall variability are predicted in the region of Mexico and Central America (Mesoamerica). This region is plagued with pests and diseases that have already caused millions of dollars in damages and losses to the coffee industry.This paper examines three pests that negatively affect coffee plants: the coffee borer beetle, the black twig borer,and nematodes. In addition, this paper examines three diseases that can destroy coffee crops: bacterial blight,coffee berry disease, and coffee leaf rust. This paper will review the literature on how these pests and diseases are predicted to affect coffee crops under climate change models. In general, increased temperatures will increase the spread of pest and disease in coffee crops. Projected decreased rainfall in Honduras and Nicaragua may decrease the spread of pest and disease. However, these are complex issues which still require further study.  
  Address Climatol Weather Forecasting  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2332-2594 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 964  
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Author Le Sommer, Julien; Chassignet, E.P.; Wallcraft, A. J. url  openurl
  Title Ocean Circulation Modeling for Operational Oceanography: Current Status and Future Challenges Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
  Year 2018 Publication New Frontiers in Operational Oceanography Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 289-305  
  Keywords OCEAN MODELING; OCEAN CIRCULATION; PARAMETERIZATIONS  
  Abstract This chapter focuses on ocean circulation models used in operational oceanography, physical oceanography and climate science. Ocean circulation models area particular branch of ocean numerical modeling that focuses on the representation of ocean physical properties over spatial scales ranging from the global scale to less than a kilometer and time scales ranging from hours to decades. As such, they are an essential build-ing block for operational oceanography systems and their design receives a lot of attention from operational and research centers.  
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  Publisher GODAE OceanView Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P., A. Pascual, J. Tintoré, and J. Verron  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 948  
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Author Bourassa, M.A., and P.J. Hughes url  doi
openurl 
  Title Surface Heat Fluxes and Wind Remote Sensing Type $loc['typeBook Chapter']
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 245-270  
  Keywords HEAT; OCEAN SURFACE; WINDS; SCATTEROMETERS; FLUXE; STRESS; RESPONSES  
  Abstract The exchange of heat and momentum through the air-sea surface are critical aspects of ocean forcing and ocean modeling. Over most of the global oceans, there are few in situ observations that can be used to estimate these fluxes. This chapter provides background on the calculation and application of air-sea fluxes, as well as the use of remote sensing to calculate these fluxes. Wind variability makes a large contribution to variability in surface fluxes, and the remote sensing of winds is relatively mature compared to the air sea differences in temperature and humidity, which are the other key variables. Therefore, the remote sensing of wind is presented in greater detail. These details enable the reader to understand how the improper use of satellite winds can result in regional and seasonal biases in fluxes, and how to calculate fluxes in a manner that removes these biases. Examples are given of high-resolution applications of fluxes, which are used to indicate the strengths and weakness of satellite-based calculations of ocean surface fluxes.  
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  Publisher GODAE OceanView Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P., A. Pascual, J. Tintoré, and J. Verron  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 947  
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Author Liu, M.; Lin, J.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zheng, B.; Shao, J.; Chen, L.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, J.; Fu, T.-M.; Yan, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatiotemporal variability of NO2 and PM2.5 over Eastern China: observational and model analyses with a novel statistical method Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Chem. Phys.  
  Volume 18 Issue 17 Pages 12933-12952  
  Keywords TROPOSPHERIC NITROGEN-DIOXIDE; PROVINCIAL CAPITAL CITIES; CRITERIA AIR-POLLUTANTS; BOUNDARY-LAYER; NORTH CHINA; HILBERT SPECTRUM; UNITED-STATES; TIME-SERIES; OZONE; EMISSIONS  
  Abstract Eastern China (27-41 degrees N, 110-123 degrees E) is heavily polluted by nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter below 2.5 mu m (PM2.5), and other air pollutants. These pollutants vary on a variety of temporal and spatial scales, with many temporal scales that are nonperiodic and nonstationary, challenging proper quantitative characterization and visualization. This study uses a newly compiled EOF-EEMD analysis visualization package to evaluate the spatiotemporal variability of ground-level NO2, PM2.5, and their associations with meteorological processes over Eastern China in fall-winter 2013. Applying the package to observed hourly pollutant data reveals a primary spatial pattern representing Eastern China synchronous variation in time, which is dominated by diurnal variability with a much weaker day-to-day signal. A secondary spatial mode, representing north-south opposing changes in time with no constant period, is characterized by wind-related dilution or a buildup of pollutants from one day to another.

We further evaluate simulations of nested GEOS-Chem v9-02 and WRF/CMAQ v5.0.1 in capturing the spatiotemporal variability of pollutants. GEOS-Chem underestimates NO2 by about 17 mu g m(-3) and PM2.5 by 35 mu g m(-3 )on average over fall-winter 2013. It reproduces the diurnal variability for both pollutants. For the day-to-day variation, GEOS-Chem reproduces the observed north-south contrasting mode for both pollutants but not the Eastern China synchronous mode (especially for NO2). The model errors are due to a first model layer too thick (about 130 m) to capture the near-surface vertical gradient, deficiencies in the nighttime nitrogen chemistry in the first layer, and missing secondary organic aerosols and anthropogenic dust. CMAQ overestimates the diurnal cycle of pollutants due to too-weak boundary layer mixing, especially in the nighttime, and overestimates NO2 by about 30 mu g m(-3) and PM2.5 by 60 mu g m(-3). For the day-to-day variability, CMAQ reproduces the observed Eastern China synchronous mode but not the north-south opposing mode of NO2. Both models capture the day-to-day variability of PM2.5 better than that of NO2. These results shed light on model improvement. The EOF-EEMD package is freely available for noncommercial uses.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1680-7324 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 946  
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Author Morey, S. L.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Bourassa, M. A. url  openurl
  Title Impact of Stokes Drift on Measurements of Surface Currents from Drifters and HF Radar Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages  
  Keywords 3307 Boundary layer processes, ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSESDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4560 Surface waves and tides, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4572 Upper ocean and mixed layer processes, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL  
  Abstract Concurrent measurements by surface drifters of different configurations and HF radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface seawater velocity. On average, speeds of small ultra-thin (5 cm) drifters are significantly greater than co-located drifters with a traditional shallow drogue design, while velocity measurements from the drogued drifters closely match HF radar velocity estimates. Analysis of directional wave spectra measurements from a nearby buoy reveals that Stokes drift accounts for much of the difference between the velocity measurements from the drogued drifters and the ultra-thin drifters, except during times of wave breaking. Under wave breaking conditions, the difference between the ultra-thin drifter velocity and the drogued drifter velocity is much less than the computed Stokes drift. The results suggest that surface currents measured by more common approaches or simulated in models may underrepresent the velocity at the very surface of the ocean that is important for determining momentum and enthalpy fluxes between the ocean and atmosphere and for estimating transport of material at the ocean surface. However, simply adding an estimate of Stokes drift may also not be an appropriate method for estimating the true surface velocity from models or measurements from drogued drifters or HF radar under all sea conditions.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1008  
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Author Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P. url  openurl
  Title An information technology foundation for fostering interdisciplinary oceanographic research and analysis Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages  
  Keywords 1914 Data mining, INFORMATICSDE: 4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICALDE: 4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL  
  Abstract Before complex analysis of oceanographic or any earth science data can occur, it must be placed in the proper domain of computing and software resources. In the past this was nearly always the scientist's personal computer or institutional computer servers. The problem with this approach is that it is necessary to bring the data products directly to these compute resources leading to large data transfers and storage requirements especially for high volume satellite or model datasets. In this presentation we will present a new technological solution under development and implementation at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for conducting oceanographic and related research based on satellite data and other sources. Fundamentally, our approach for satellite resources is to tile (partition) the data inputs into cloud-optimized and computation friendly databases that allow distributed computing resources to perform on demand and server-side computation and data analytics. This technology, known as NEXUS, has already been implemented in several existing NASA data portals to support oceanographic, sea-level, and gravity data time series analysis with capabilities to output time-average maps, correlation maps, Hovmöller plots, climatological averages and more. A further extension of this technology will integrate ocean in situ observations, event-based data discovery (e.g., natural disasters), data quality screening and additional capabilities. This particular activity is an open source project known as the Apache Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) (https://sdap.apache.org), and colloquially as OceanWorks, and is funded by the NASA AIST program. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources for the researcher allowing them to focus on research results and hypothesis testing, and not be concerned with security, data preparation and management. We will present a few oceanographic and interdisciplinary use cases demonstrating the capabilities for characterizing regional sea-level rise, sea surface temperature anomalies, and ocean hurricane responses.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1004  
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Author Morrison, T.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; McClean, J.; Gille, S. T.; Chassignet, E. url  openurl
  Title Causes of the anomalous heat flux onto the Greenland continental shelf Type $loc['typeAbstract']
  Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU  
  Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages  
  Keywords 0726 Ice sheets, CRYOSPHEREDE: 4207 Arctic and Antarctic oceanography, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4215 Climate and interannual variability, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4255 Numerical modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL  
  Abstract On the continental shelf around Greenland, warm-salty Atlantic water at depth fills the deep narrow fjords where Greenland's tidewater glaciers terminate. Changes in the quantity or properties of this water mass starting in the mid 1990s is thought to be largely responsible for increased ocean-driven melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Using high-resolution (nominal 0.1-degree) ocean circulation models we cannot accurately resolve small-scale processes on the shelf or within fjords. However, we can assess changes in the flux of heat via Atlantic water onto the continental shelf. To understand the causes of the anomalous heat that has reached the shelf we examine heat content of subtropical gyre water and shifts in the North Atlantic and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillations.

We compare changes in heat transport in two eddy permitting simulations: a global 0.1 degree (5-7km around Greenland) resolution coupled hindcast (1970-2009) simulation of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) and a regional 0.08 degree (3-5km around Greenland) resolution coupled HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) hindcast (1993-2016) simulation. Both models are coupled to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Community Ice CodE version 4 and forced by atmospheric reanalysis fluxes. In both models we look for processes that could explain the increase in heat; processes that are present in both are likely to be robust causes of warming.
 
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1009  
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