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Author Morey, S. L.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Bourassa, M. A.
Title Impact of Stokes Drift on Measurements of Surface Currents from Drifters and HF Radar Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 3307 Boundary layer processes, ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSESDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4560 Surface waves and tides, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4572 Upper ocean and mixed layer processes, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL
Abstract Concurrent measurements by surface drifters of different configurations and HF radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface seawater velocity. On average, speeds of small ultra-thin (5 cm) drifters are significantly greater than co-located drifters with a traditional shallow drogue design, while velocity measurements from the drogued drifters closely match HF radar velocity estimates. Analysis of directional wave spectra measurements from a nearby buoy reveals that Stokes drift accounts for much of the difference between the velocity measurements from the drogued drifters and the ultra-thin drifters, except during times of wave breaking. Under wave breaking conditions, the difference between the ultra-thin drifter velocity and the drogued drifter velocity is much less than the computed Stokes drift. The results suggest that surface currents measured by more common approaches or simulated in models may underrepresent the velocity at the very surface of the ocean that is important for determining momentum and enthalpy fluxes between the ocean and atmosphere and for estimating transport of material at the ocean surface. However, simply adding an estimate of Stokes drift may also not be an appropriate method for estimating the true surface velocity from models or measurements from drogued drifters or HF radar under all sea conditions.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1008
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Author Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P.
Title An information technology foundation for fostering interdisciplinary oceanographic research and analysis Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 1914 Data mining, INFORMATICSDE: 4805 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICALDE: 4273 Physical and biogeochemical interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL
Abstract Before complex analysis of oceanographic or any earth science data can occur, it must be placed in the proper domain of computing and software resources. In the past this was nearly always the scientist's personal computer or institutional computer servers. The problem with this approach is that it is necessary to bring the data products directly to these compute resources leading to large data transfers and storage requirements especially for high volume satellite or model datasets. In this presentation we will present a new technological solution under development and implementation at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for conducting oceanographic and related research based on satellite data and other sources. Fundamentally, our approach for satellite resources is to tile (partition) the data inputs into cloud-optimized and computation friendly databases that allow distributed computing resources to perform on demand and server-side computation and data analytics. This technology, known as NEXUS, has already been implemented in several existing NASA data portals to support oceanographic, sea-level, and gravity data time series analysis with capabilities to output time-average maps, correlation maps, Hovmöller plots, climatological averages and more. A further extension of this technology will integrate ocean in situ observations, event-based data discovery (e.g., natural disasters), data quality screening and additional capabilities. This particular activity is an open source project known as the Apache Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) (https://sdap.apache.org), and colloquially as OceanWorks, and is funded by the NASA AIST program. It harmonizes data, tools and computational resources for the researcher allowing them to focus on research results and hypothesis testing, and not be concerned with security, data preparation and management. We will present a few oceanographic and interdisciplinary use cases demonstrating the capabilities for characterizing regional sea-level rise, sea surface temperature anomalies, and ocean hurricane responses.
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1004
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Author Zheng, Y.; Bourassa, M. A.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.
Title Upper-Ocean Processes Controlling the Sea Surface Temperature in the Western Gulf of Mexico Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 4299 General or miscellaneous, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL
Abstract This study examines the upper-ocean processes controlling the mixed layer temperature in the western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) through estimating the contributing terms in the heat equation, with an emphasis on eddies' role. The major heat contributing terms for the upper GOM were estimated using two ocean reanalysis datasets: an eddy-resolving HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA). Analysis of net surface heat fluxes from four datasets reveals that the long-term mean net surface heat flux cools the northern GOM and warms the southern GOM. Two regions are focused for analysis: an eddy-rich region where LCEs are energetic, and the southwestern Gulf where eddy activity is relatively weak and the features of near surface temperature differ from the eddy-rich region. An eddy-rich region in the western GOM is defined based on the eddy kinetic energy derived from satellite sea surface heights. The long-term mean horizontal heat advection causes a weak warming over most of the eddy rich region, partly attributed to the flow-temperature configuration that the long-term and seasonally mean flow is nearly parallel to the corresponding mean isotherms. By contrast, the temporal mean vertical heat advection causes a strong warming in the eddy rich region, partly balancing the cooling caused by net surface heat flux. The temporal mean eddy heat flux convergence in the western GOM, whose positive and negative values are not small at some locations, appears heterogeneous in space, resulting in a small term for the western GOM when area averaged. The persistent warm water in the southwestern Gulf is primarily caused by the net warming from net surface heat flux rather than from eddies and heat advection.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1007
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Author Jacob, J. C.; Armstrong, E. M.; Bourassa, M. A.; Cram, T.; Elya, J. L.; Greguska, F. R., III; Huang, T.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, Y.; Li, Y.; McGibbney, L. J.; Quach, N.; Smith, S. R.; Tsontos, V. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Worley, S. J.; Yang, C. P.
Title OceanWorks: Enabling Interactive Oceanographic Analysis in the Cloud with Multivariate Data Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 910 Data assimilation, integration and fusion, INFORMATICSDE: 1916 Data and information discovery, INFORMATICSDE: 1926 Geospatial, INFORMATICSDE: 1942 Machine learning, INFORMATICS
Abstract NASA's Advanced Information System Technology (AIST) Program sponsors the OceanWorks project to establish an integrated data analytics center at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC). OceanWorks provides a series of interoperable capabilities that are essential for cloud-scale oceanographic research. These include big data analytics, data search with subsecond response, intelligent ranking of search results, subsetting based on data quality metrics, and rapid spatiotemporal matchup of satellite measurements with distributed in situ data. The software behind OceanWorks is being developed as an open source project in the Apache Incubator Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP – http://sdap.apache.org). In this presentation we describe how OceanWorks enables efficient, scalable, interactive and interdisciplinary oceanographic analysis with multivariate data.

Interactivity is enabled by a number of SDAP features. First, SDAP provides Representational State Transfer (REST) interfaces to a number of built-in cloud analytics to compute time series, time-averaged maps, correlation maps, climatological maps, Hovmöller maps, and more. To access these, users simply navigate to a properly constructed parameterized URL in their web browser or issue web services calls in a variety of programming languages or in a Jupyter notebook. Alternatively, Python clients can make function calls via the NEXUS Command Line Interface (CLI). Authenticated users can even inject their own custom code via REST calls or the CLI.

To enable interdisciplinary science, OceanWorks provides access to a rich collection of multivariate satellite and in situ measurements of the oceans (e.g., sea surface temperature, height and salinity, chlorophyll and circulation) and other Earth science data (e.g., aerosol optical depth and wind speed), coupled with on-demand processing capabilities close to the data. We partition the data across space or time into tiles and store them into cloud-aware databases that are collocated with the computations. We will provide examples of scientific studies directly enabled by OceanWorks' multivariate data and cloud analytics.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1005
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Author Bourassa, M.; Gille, S.; Jackson, D.; Roberts, J.B.; Wick, G.
Title Ocean Winds and Turbulent Air-Sea Fluxes Inferred From Remote Sensing Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2010 Publication Oceanography Abbreviated Journal Oceanog.
Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 36-51
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1042-8275 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding NASA, OVWST, NOAA, OCO Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 366
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Author Ardhuin, F.; Chapron, B.; Maes, C.; Romeiser, R.; Gommenginger, C.; Cravatte, S.; Morrow, R.; Donlon, C.; Bourassa, M.
Title Satellite Doppler observations for the motions of the oceans Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Satellite remote sensing has revolutionized oceanography, starting from sea surface temperature, ocean color, sea level, winds, waves, and the recent addition of sea surface salinity, providing a global view of upper ocean processes. The possible addition of a direct measurement of surface velocities related to currents, winds and waves opens great opportunities for research and applications.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1025
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Author Fairall, C.W., Barnier, B., Berry, D.I, Bourassa, M.A., Bradley, E.F., Clayson, C.A., de Leeuw, G., Drennan, W.M., Gille, S.T., Gulev, S.K., Kent, E.C., McGillis, W.R., Quartly, G.D., Ryabinin, V., Smith, S.R., Weller, R.A., Yelland, M.J. and Zhang, H-M.
Title Observations to Quantify Air-Sea Fluxes and Their Role in Climate Variability and Predictability Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2010 Publication Proceedings of OceanObs'09: Sustained Ocean Observations and Information for Society, Vol. 2 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 299-313
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Publisher European Space Agency Place of Publication Editor Hall, J., Harrison, D.E. and Stammer, D. (eds.)
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Funding NOAA, COD, NASA, NEWS Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 270
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Author Bourassa, M. A.
Title Tehuantepec wind and pressure changes associated with tropical cyclones Type $loc['typeConference Article']
Year 2001 Publication 11th Conference on Interactions of the Sea and Atmosphere, Amer. Meteor. Soc., San Diego, CA, USA Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 27-28
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Funding NASA, SEAWINDS, OVWST Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 815
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Author Hilburn, K. A.; Bourassa, M. A.; O'Brien, J. J.
Title Development of scatterometer-derived research-quality surface pressure fields for the Southern Ocean Type $loc['typeReport']
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 30-31
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Publisher AMS Place of Publication Orlando, FL Editor
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Funding NASA, ONR Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 838
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Author Bourassa, M. A.; Hughes, P. J.; Smith, S. R.
Title Surface Turbulent Flux Product Comparison Type $loc['typeMagazine Article']
Year 2008 Publication Flux News Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue Pages 22-24
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Funding NSF, NOAA, COD Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 692
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