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Author Griffin, J
Title Characterization of Errors in Various Moisture Roughness Length Parameterizations Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Boundary Layer Meteorology, Roughness Length Parameterization, Moisture Roughness Lengths
Abstract Often the parameterization of the moisture roughness length is not seen as being important, as long as the parameterization seems reasonable; that is, it is within the rather considerable bounds of error for the data sets used to determine the parameterization. However, the choice of parameterization does influence height adjustments of humidity and calculations of turbulent heat fluxes. This paper focuses on the calculation of the turbulent heat fluxes using different parameterizations of roughness length. Five roughness length parameterizations are examined herein. These parameterizations include wall theory; the Clayson, Fairall, Curry parameterization; the Liu, Katsaros, Businger parameterization; Zilitinkevich et al. parameterization; and the COARE3.0 parameterization. Turbulent heat fluxes are calculated from each parameterization of the roughness length and are compared to observed turbulent heat flux values. The bulk latent heat flux estimates have a much better signal to noise ratio than the sensible heat fluxes, and are therefore the focus of the comparison to observations. This comparison indicates how to improve the proportionality in the above roughness length parameterizations, which are causing modeled turbulent heat flux magnitudes to be too large in four of the five parameterizations. The modeled turbulent heat fluxes are evaluated again after the modification of the parameterizations. Significant improvements in both the bias and the root mean square error (RMSE) are seen. Three parameterizations see roughly the same improvements of around 17Wm^-2 in the bias and roughly 10Wm^-2 in the RMSE. The largest improvements are in the Liu, Katsaros, Businger parameterization with bias improvements of over 45Wm^-2 and a RMSE reduction of nearly 32Wm^-2.
Address Department of Meteorology
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Master's thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 603
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Author Morey, S. L.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Bourassa, M. A.
Title Impact of Stokes Drift on Measurements of Surface Currents from Drifters and HF Radar Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 3307 Boundary layer processes, ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSESDE: 4504 Air/sea interactions, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4560 Surface waves and tides, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICALDE: 4572 Upper ocean and mixed layer processes, OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL
Abstract Concurrent measurements by surface drifters of different configurations and HF radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface seawater velocity. On average, speeds of small ultra-thin (5 cm) drifters are significantly greater than co-located drifters with a traditional shallow drogue design, while velocity measurements from the drogued drifters closely match HF radar velocity estimates. Analysis of directional wave spectra measurements from a nearby buoy reveals that Stokes drift accounts for much of the difference between the velocity measurements from the drogued drifters and the ultra-thin drifters, except during times of wave breaking. Under wave breaking conditions, the difference between the ultra-thin drifter velocity and the drogued drifter velocity is much less than the computed Stokes drift. The results suggest that surface currents measured by more common approaches or simulated in models may underrepresent the velocity at the very surface of the ocean that is important for determining momentum and enthalpy fluxes between the ocean and atmosphere and for estimating transport of material at the ocean surface. However, simply adding an estimate of Stokes drift may also not be an appropriate method for estimating the true surface velocity from models or measurements from drogued drifters or HF radar under all sea conditions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1008
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Author Weihs, R
Title Surface and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Responses to Diurnal Variations of Sea Surface Temperature in an NWP Model Type $loc['typeManuscript']
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Marine Boundary Layer; Numerical Weather Prediction; Sea Surface Temperature
Abstract
Address Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science
Corporate Author Thesis $loc['Ph.D. thesis']
Publisher Florida State University Place of Publication Tallahassee, FL Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 339
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Author Zou, M.; Xiong, X.; Wu, Z.; Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, L.
Title Increase of Atmospheric Methane Observed from Space-Borne and Ground-Based Measurements Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages
Keywords Methane increase trend; Boundary layer; Mid-upper troposphere; Satellite; AIRS
Abstract It has been found that the concentration of atmospheric methane (CH4) has rapidly increased since 2007 after a decade of nearly constant concentration in the atmosphere. As an important greenhouse gas, such an increase could enhance the threat of global warming. To better quantify this increasing trend, a novel statistic method, i.e. the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method, was used to analyze the CH4 trends from three different measurements: the mid-upper tropospheric CH4 (MUT) from the space-borne measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the CH4 in the marine boundary layer (MBL) from NOAA ground-based in-situ measurements, and the column-averaged CH4 in the atmosphere (X-CH4) from the ground-based up-looking Fourier Transform Spectrometers at Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Comparison of the CH4 trends in the mid-upper troposphere, lower troposphere, and the column average from these three data sets shows that, overall, these trends agree well in capturing the abrupt CH4 increase in 2007 (the first peak) and an even faster increase after 2013 (the second peak) over the globe. The increased rates of CH4 in the MUT, as observed by AIRS, are overall smaller than CH4 in MBL and the column-average CH4. During 2009-2011, there was a dip in the increase rate for CH4 in MBL, and the MUT-CH4 increase rate was almost negligible in the mid-high latitude regions. The increase of the column-average CH4 also reached the minimum during 2009-2011 accordingly, suggesting that the trends of CH4 are not only impacted by the surface emission, however that they also may be impacted by other processes like transport and chemical reaction loss associated with [OH]. One advantage of the EEMD analysis is to derive the monthly rate and the results show that the frequency of the variability of CH4 increase rates in the mid-high northern latitude regions is larger than those in the tropics and southern hemisphere.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1055
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