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Author Xu, X.; Bower, A.; Furey, H.; Chassignet, E.P.
Title Variability of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water Transport Through the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone: Results From an Eddying Simulation and Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans
Volume 123 Issue 8 Pages 5808-5823
Keywords Iceland; Scotland overflow water; Charlie; Gibbs fracture zone; variability; volume transport; eddying simulation
Abstract Observations show that the westward transport of the Iceland‐Scotland overflow water (ISOW) through the Charlie‐Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) is highly variable. This study examines (a) where this variability comes from and (b) how it is related to the variability of ISOW transport at upstream locations in the Iceland Basin and other ISOW flow pathways. The analyses are based on a 35‐year 1/12° eddying Atlantic simulation that represents well the main features of the observed ISOW in the area of interest, in particular, the transport variability through the CGFZ. The results show that (a) the variability of the ISOW transport is closely correlated with that of the barotropic transports in the CGFZ associated with the meridional displacement of the North Atlantic Current front and is possibly induced by fluctuations of large‐scale zonal wind stress in the Western European Basin east of the CGFZ; (b) the variability of the ISOW transport is increased by a factor of 3 from the northern part of the Iceland Basin to the CGFZ region and transport time series at these two locations are not correlated, further suggesting that the variability at the CGFZ does not come from the upstream source; and (c) the variability of the ISOW transport at the CGFZ is strongly anticorrelated to that of the southward ISOW transport along the eastern flank of the Mid‐Atlantic Ridge, suggesting an out‐of‐phase covarying transport between these two ISOW pathways.
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ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 952
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Author Zavala-Hidalgo, J; Pares-Sierra, A; Ochoa, J
Title Seasonal variability of the temperature and heat fluxes in the Gulf of Mexico Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2002 Publication Atmosfera Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 81-104
Keywords Gulf of Mexico; heat fluxes; numerical model; sea surface temperature; seasonal variability
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Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 498
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Author Zhang, M.; Wu, Z.; Qiao, F.
Title Deep Atlantic Ocean Warming Facilitated by the Deep Western Boundary Current and Equatorial Kelvin Waves Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 31 Issue 20 Pages 8541-8555
Keywords Ocean; Atlantic Ocean; Heating; Kelvin waves; Ocean circulation; Oceanic variability; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; NORTH-ATLANTIC; CLIMATE-CHANGE; HEAT-CONTENT; HIATUS; VARIABILITY; CIRCULATION; TEMPERATURE; PACIFIC
Abstract Increased heat storage in deep oceans has been proposed to account for the slowdown of global surface warming since the end of the twentieth century. How the imbalanced heat at the surface has been redistributed to deep oceans remains to be elucidated. Here, the evolution of deep Atlantic Ocean heat storage since 1950 on multidecadal or longer time scales is revealed. The anomalous heat in the deep Labrador Sea was transported southward by the shallower core of the deep western boundary current (DWBC). Upon reaching the equator around 1980, this heat transport route bifurcated into two, with one continuing southward along the DWBC and the other extending eastward along a narrow strip (about 4 degrees width) centered at the equator. In the 1990s and 2000s, meridional diffusion helped to spread warming in the tropics, making the eastward equatorial warming extension have a narrow head and wider tail. The deep Atlantic Ocean warming since 1950 had overlapping variability of approximately 60 years. The results suggest that the current basinwide Atlantic Ocean warming at depths of 1000-2000 m can be traced back to the subsurface warming in the Labrador Sea in the 1950s. An inference from these results is that the increased heat storage in the twenty-first century in the deep Atlantic Ocean is unlikely to partly account for the atmospheric radiative imbalance during the last two decades and to serve as an explanation for the current warming hiatus.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 950
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Author Zhao, X.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, W.; Tian, J.; Xu, X.
Title Deepwater overflow observed by three bottom-anchored moorings in the Bashi Channel Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2016 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume 110 Issue Pages 65-74
Keywords Deepwater overflow; Bashi Channel; Volume transport; Spatial structure; Temporal variability
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 92
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