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Author Bunge, L.; Clarke, A.J.
Title On the Warm Water Volume and Its Changing Relationship with ENSO Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.
Volume 44 Issue 5 Pages 1372-1385
Keywords Physical Meteorology and Climatology; Climate variability; ENSO; Observational techniques and algorithms; Climate records; Variability; Decadal variability; Interannual variability
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 156
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lim, Y.-K.; Kim, K.-Y.
Title A New Perspective on the Climate Prediction of Asian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 19 Issue 19 Pages 4840-4853
Keywords Monsoons; Asia; Intraseasonal variability; Precipitation
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 708
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Perron, M.; Sura, P.
Title Climatology of Non-Gaussian Atmospheric Statistics Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 1063-1083
Keywords Atmospheric circulation; Extreme events; Climate variability; Climatology; Statistics; Time series
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 225
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gilford, D.M.; Smith, S.R.; Griffin, M.L.; Arguez, A.
Title Southeastern U.S. Daily Temperature Ranges Associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol.
Volume 52 Issue 11 Pages 2434-2449
Keywords Climate variability; Climatology; ENSO; Surface temperature; Climate records
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1558-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 180
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Author Wei, J.; Dirmeyer, P.A.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, L.; Misra, V.
Title How Much Do Different Land Models Matter for Climate Simulation? Part I: Climatology and Variability Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 3120-3134
Keywords Land surface model; Climatology; Surface fluxes; Climate variability; Model comparison; Precipitation
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 370
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Misra, V.; Dirmeyer, P.A.
Title Air, Sea, and Land Interactions of the Continental U.S. Hydroclimate Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Hydrometeorology Abbreviated Journal J. Hydrometeor
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 353-373
Keywords Atmosphere-land interaction; Hydrometeorology; Climatology; Air-sea interaction; Multidecadal variability; Coupled models
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1525-755X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 664
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Misra, V.; Bhardwaj, A.
Title Defining the Northeast Monsoon of India Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2019 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.
Volume 147 Issue 3 Pages 791-807
Keywords Indian Summer Monsoon, intraseasonal,Climate models, variability, NEM, rainfall
Abstract This study introduces an objective definition for onset and demise of the Northeast Indian Monsoon (NEM). The definition is based on the land surface temperature analysis over the Indian subcontinent. It is diagnosed from the inflection points in the daily anomaly cumulative curve of the area-averaged surface temperature over the provinces of Andhra Pradesh, Rayalseema, and Tamil Nadu located in the southeastern part of India. Per this definition, the climatological onset and demise dates of the NEM season are 6 November and 13 March, respectively. The composite evolution of the seasonal cycle of 850hPa winds, surface wind stress, surface ocean currents, and upper ocean heat content suggest a seasonal shift around the time of the diagnosed onset and demise dates of the NEM season. The interannual variations indicate onset date variations have a larger impact than demise date variations on the seasonal length, seasonal anomalies of rainfall, and surface temperature of the NEM. Furthermore, it is shown that warm El Niño�Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes are associated with excess seasonal rainfall, warm seasonal land surface temperature anomalies, and reduced lengths of the NEM season. Likewise, cold ENSO episodes are likely to be related to seasonal deficit rainfall anomalies, cold land surface temperature anomalies, and increased lengths of the NEM season.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 999
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Steffen, J.; Bourassa, M.
Title Barrier Layer Development Local to Tropical Cyclones based on Argo Float Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.
Volume 48 Issue 9 Pages 1951-1968
Keywords SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURE; UPPER-OCEAN RESPONSE; NINO SOUTHERN-OSCILLATION; MIXED-LAYER; INDIAN-OCEAN; HEAT-BUDGET; NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS; HURRICANES; VARIABILITY; PACIFIC
Abstract The objective of this study is to quantify barrier layer development due to tropical cyclone (TC) passage using Argo float observations of temperature and salinity. To accomplish this objective, a climatology of Argo float measurements is developed from 2001 to 2014 for the Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and central Pacific basins. Each Argo float sample consists of a prestorm and poststorm temperature and salinity profile pair. In addition, a no-TC Argo pair dataset is derived for comparison to account for natural ocean state variability and instrument sensitivity. The Atlantic basin shows a statistically significant increase in barrier layer thickness (BLT) and barrier layer potential energy (BLPE) that is largely attributable to an increase of 2.6 m in the post-TC isothermal layer depth (ITLD). The eastern Pacific basin shows no significant changes to any barrier layer characteristic, likely due to a shallow and highly stratified pycnocline. However, the near-surface layer freshens in the upper 30 m after TC passage, which increases static stability. Finally, the central Pacific has a statistically significant freshening in the upper 20-30 m that increases upper-ocean stratification by similar to 35%. The mechanisms responsible for increases in BLPE vary between the Atlantic and both Pacific basins; the Atlantic is sensitive to ITLD deepening, while the Pacific basins show near-surface freshening to be more important in barrier layer development. In addition, Argo data subsets are used to investigate the physical relationships between the barrier layer and TC intensity, TC translation speed, radial distance from TC center, and time after TC passage.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 970
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, M.; Wu, Z.; Qiao, F.
Title Deep Atlantic Ocean Warming Facilitated by the Deep Western Boundary Current and Equatorial Kelvin Waves Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 31 Issue 20 Pages 8541-8555
Keywords Ocean; Atlantic Ocean; Heating; Kelvin waves; Ocean circulation; Oceanic variability; EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION; NONSTATIONARY TIME-SERIES; NORTH-ATLANTIC; CLIMATE-CHANGE; HEAT-CONTENT; HIATUS; VARIABILITY; CIRCULATION; TEMPERATURE; PACIFIC
Abstract Increased heat storage in deep oceans has been proposed to account for the slowdown of global surface warming since the end of the twentieth century. How the imbalanced heat at the surface has been redistributed to deep oceans remains to be elucidated. Here, the evolution of deep Atlantic Ocean heat storage since 1950 on multidecadal or longer time scales is revealed. The anomalous heat in the deep Labrador Sea was transported southward by the shallower core of the deep western boundary current (DWBC). Upon reaching the equator around 1980, this heat transport route bifurcated into two, with one continuing southward along the DWBC and the other extending eastward along a narrow strip (about 4 degrees width) centered at the equator. In the 1990s and 2000s, meridional diffusion helped to spread warming in the tropics, making the eastward equatorial warming extension have a narrow head and wider tail. The deep Atlantic Ocean warming since 1950 had overlapping variability of approximately 60 years. The results suggest that the current basinwide Atlantic Ocean warming at depths of 1000-2000 m can be traced back to the subsurface warming in the Labrador Sea in the 1950s. An inference from these results is that the increased heat storage in the twenty-first century in the deep Atlantic Ocean is unlikely to partly account for the atmospheric radiative imbalance during the last two decades and to serve as an explanation for the current warming hiatus.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 950
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sura, P.; Hannachi, A.
Title Perspectives of Non-Gaussianity in Atmospheric Synoptic and Low-Frequency Variability Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 28 Issue 13 Pages 5091-5114
Keywords Atmospheric circulation; Nonlinear dynamics; Statistics; Climate variability
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 114
Permanent link to this record

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