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Author (up) Morey, S.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Bourassa, M.
Title Measurement Characteristics of Near-Surface Currents from Ultra-Thin Drifters, Drogued Drifters, and HF Radar Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 10 Pages 1633
Keywords surface drifters; surface currents; HF Radar
Abstract Concurrent measurements by satellite tracked drifters of different hull and drogue configurations and coastal high-frequency radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface velocity. These measurements are important for understanding and predicting material transport on the ocean surface as well as the vertical structure of the near-surface currents. These near-surface current observations were obtained during a field experiment in the northern Gulf of Mexico intended to test a new ultra-thin drifter design. During the experiment, thirty small cylindrical drifters with 5 cm height, twenty-eight similar drifters with 10 cm hull height, and fourteen drifters with 91 cm tall drogues centered at 100 cm depth were deployed within the footprint of coastal High-Frequency (HF) radar. Comparison of collocated velocity measurements reveals systematic differences in surface velocity estimates obtained from the different measurement techniques, as well as provides information on properties of the drifter behavior and near-surface shear. Results show that the HF radar velocity estimates had magnitudes significantly lower than the 5 cm and 10 cm drifter velocity of approximately 45% and 35%, respectively. The HF radar velocity magnitudes were similar to the drogued drifter velocity. Analysis of wave directional spectra measurements reveals that surface Stokes drift accounts for much of the velocity difference between the drogued drifters and the thin surface drifters except during times of wave breaking.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 987
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Morey, S.; Wienders, N.; Dukhovskoy, D.; Bourassa, M.
Title Measurement Characteristics of Near-Surface Currents from Ultra-Thin Drifters, Drogued Drifters, and HF Radar Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 10 Pages 1633
Keywords surface drifters; surface currents; HF Radar; STOKES DRIFT; SEA-SURFACE; WAVES; BREAKING; VALIDATION; TRANSPORT
Abstract Concurrent measurements by satellite tracked drifters of different hull and drogue configurations and coastal high-frequency radar reveal substantial differences in estimates of the near-surface velocity. These measurements are important for understanding and predicting material transport on the ocean surface as well as the vertical structure of the near-surface currents. These near-surface current observations were obtained during a field experiment in the northern Gulf of Mexico intended to test a new ultra-thin drifter design. During the experiment, thirty small cylindrical drifters with 5 cm height, twenty-eight similar drifters with 10 cm hull height, and fourteen drifters with 91 cm tall drogues centered at 100 cm depth were deployed within the footprint of coastal High-Frequency (HF) radar. Comparison of collocated velocity measurements reveals systematic differences in surface velocity estimates obtained from the different measurement techniques, as well as provides information on properties of the drifter behavior and near-surface shear. Results show that the HF radar velocity estimates had magnitudes significantly lower than the 5 cm and 10 cm drifter velocity of approximately 45% and 35%, respectively. The HF radar velocity magnitudes were similar to the drogued drifter velocity. Analysis of wave directional spectra measurements reveals that surface Stokes drift accounts for much of the velocity difference between the drogued drifters and the thin surface drifters except during times of wave breaking.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 985
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Morrison, T.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; McClean, J.; Gille, S. T.; Chassignet, E.
Title Causes of the anomalous heat flux onto the Greenland continental shelf Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume Fall Meeting Issue Pages
Keywords 0726 Ice sheets, CRYOSPHEREDE: 4207 Arctic and Antarctic oceanography, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4215 Climate and interannual variability, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERALDE: 4255 Numerical modeling, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL
Abstract On the continental shelf around Greenland, warm-salty Atlantic water at depth fills the deep narrow fjords where Greenland's tidewater glaciers terminate. Changes in the quantity or properties of this water mass starting in the mid 1990s is thought to be largely responsible for increased ocean-driven melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Using high-resolution (nominal 0.1-degree) ocean circulation models we cannot accurately resolve small-scale processes on the shelf or within fjords. However, we can assess changes in the flux of heat via Atlantic water onto the continental shelf. To understand the causes of the anomalous heat that has reached the shelf we examine heat content of subtropical gyre water and shifts in the North Atlantic and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillations.

We compare changes in heat transport in two eddy permitting simulations: a global 0.1 degree (5-7km around Greenland) resolution coupled hindcast (1970-2009) simulation of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) and a regional 0.08 degree (3-5km around Greenland) resolution coupled HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) hindcast (1993-2016) simulation. Both models are coupled to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Community Ice CodE version 4 and forced by atmospheric reanalysis fluxes. In both models we look for processes that could explain the increase in heat; processes that are present in both are likely to be robust causes of warming.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1009
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R.
Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume 140 Issue Pages 52-62
Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system KeyWords Plus:ZOOPLANKTON FECAL PELLETS; NORTH PACIFIC-OCEAN; CURRENT SYSTEM; SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA; UNDERWATER GLIDERS; CARBON EXPORT; ZONE; CHLOROPHYLL; STABILITY; EQUATIONS
Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014-2015) followed by an El Nino (2015-2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Nino 2016 – and three cruises during El Ninoneutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, massspecific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 983
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R.
Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system
Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014�2015) followed by an El Niño (2015�2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Niño 2016 � and three cruises during El Niño-neutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, mass-specific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention
Address Deep-Sea Research Part I
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 966
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Morrow, R.M.; Ohman, M.D.; Goericke, R.; Kelly, T.B.; Stephens, B.M.; Stukel, M.R.
Title CCE V: Primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and the biological pump in the California Current Ecosystem: Variability and response to El Niño Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Abbreviated Journal Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume 140 Issue Pages 52-62
Keywords Carbon export; Fecal pellets; Sinking particles; Interannual variability; Net primary productivity; Eastern boundary upwelling system
Abstract Predicting marine carbon sequestration in a changing climate requires mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling sinking particle flux under different climatic conditions. The recent occurrence of a warm anomaly (2014-2015) followed by an El Nino (2015-2016) in the southern sector of the California Current System presented an opportunity to analyze changes in the biological carbon pump in response to altered climate forcing. We compare primary production, mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from the euphotic zone during quasi-Lagrangian experiments conducted in contrasting conditions: two cruises during warm years – one during the warm anomaly in 2014 and one toward the end of El Nino 2016 – and three cruises during El Ninoneutral years. Results showed no substantial differences in the relationships between vertical carbon export and its presumed drivers (primary production, mesozooplankton grazing) between warm and neutral years. Mesozooplankton fecal pellet enumeration and phaeopigment measurements both showed that fecal pellets were the dominant contributor to export in productive upwelling regions. In more oligotrophic regions, fluxes were dominated by amorphous marine snow with negligible pigment content. We found no evidence for a significant shift in the relationship between mesozooplankton grazing rate and chlorophyll concentration. However, massspecific grazing rates were lower at low-to-moderate chlorophyll concentrations during warm years relative to neutral years. We also detected a significant difference in the relationship between phytoplankton primary production and photosynthetically active radiation between years: at similar irradiance and nutrient concentrations, productivity decreased during the warm events. Whether these changes resulted from species composition changes remains to be determined. Overall, our results suggest that the processes driving export remain similar during different climate conditions, but that species compositional changes or other structural changes require further attention.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1021
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) O'hara, S. H.; Arko, R. A.; Clark, D.; Chandler, C. L.; Elya, J. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; McLain, K.; Olson, C. J.; Sellers, C. J.; Smith, S. R.; Stocks, K. I.; Stolp, L.; Carbotte, S. M.
Title Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program Data Services for the Oceanographic Research Community Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords 4299 General or miscellaneous, OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL
Abstract Research vessels supported by NSF are critical platforms contributing to academic oceanographic research in the US. The “underway” data sets obtained from the continuously operating geophysical, water column, and meteorological sensors aboard these vessels provide characterization of basic environmental conditions for the oceans and are of high scientific value for building global syntheses, climatologies, and historical time series of ocean properties (e.g the World Ocean Atlas, the GMRT bathymetric synthesis, ICOADS). The Rolling deck to Repository program (www.rvdata.us) provides a central shore-side data gateway that ensures the basic documentation, assessment and submission of all environmental data from ship operators to the NOAA long-term archives for these data.

R2R provides a set of data services for the oceanographic research community, including: publishing an online, searchable and browsable master cruise catalog, supported by cruise and data set DOIs; organizing, archiving, and disseminating original underway data and documents; assessing data quality on select data types; creating select post-field data products; and supporting at-sea event logging.

In this presentation we will discuss new developments in R2R data services and challenges associated with ship-based data management. A significant challenge is the dramatic increase in data volumes associated with new sensors (e.g. the EK80 Sonar systems) whereby individual cruise distributions can be several terabytes. Ship operators, R2R and NCEI must design a way to move and store these growing volumes. R2R is also working to make information more accessible and complete. A new website has been launched along with API web services that allow users to find and use data more easily. R2R is working to improve device metadata, including working to identify the time sources for all environmental sensors to support accurate comparison and merging of data sets.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1006
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) O'hara, S. H.; Arko, R. A.; Clark, D.; Chandler, C. L.; Elya, J. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; McLain, K.; Olson, C. J.; Sellers, C. J.; Smith, S. R.; Stocks, K. I.; Stolp, L.; Carbotte, S. M.
Title Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program Data Services for the Oceanographic Research Community Type $loc['typeAbstract']
Year 2018 Publication American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal AGU
Volume American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018 Issue Pages
Keywords OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL
Abstract Research vessels supported by NSF are critical platforms contributing to academic oceanographic research in the US. The “underway” data sets obtained from the continuously operating geophysical, water column, and meteorological sensors aboard these vessels provide characterization of basic environmental conditions for the oceans and are of high scientific value for building global syntheses, climatologies, and historical time series of ocean properties (e.g the World Ocean Atlas, the GMRT bathymetric synthesis, ICOADS). The Rolling deck to Repository program (www.rvdata.us) provides a central shore-side data gateway that ensures the basic documentation, assessment and submission of all environmental data from ship operators to the NOAA long-term archives for these data. R2R provides a set of data services for the oceanographic research community, including: publishing an online, searchable and browsable master cruise catalog, supported by cruise and data set DOIs; organizing, archiving, and disseminating original underway data and documents; assessing data quality on select data types; creating select post-field data products; and supporting at-sea event logging. In this presentation we will discuss new developments in R2R data services and challenges associated with ship-based data management. A significant challenge is the dramatic increase in data volumes associated with new sensors (e.g. the EK80 Sonar systems) whereby individual cruise distributions can be several terabytes. Ship operators, R2R and NCEI must design a way to move and store these growing volumes. R2R is also working to make information more accessible and complete. A new website has been launched along with API web services that allow users to find and use data more easily. R2R is working to improve device metadata, including working to identify the time sources for all environmental sensors to support accurate comparison and merging of data sets.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1020
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Robinson, W.; Speich, S.; Chassignet, E.
Title Exploring the Interplay Between Ocean Eddies and the Atmosphere Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Eos Abbreviated Journal Eos
Volume 99 Issue Pages
Keywords Mesoscale; Climate; Variability; Atmospheric
Abstract Climate models, for the first time, have sufficient resolution to capture mesoscale ocean eddies and their interactions with the atmosphere.New model results suggest that the atmosphere, at weather scales or larger, responds to cumulative effects of the much smaller ocean eddies. Intriguing new model results presented at the workshop suggested that the atmosphere, at weather scales or larger.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2324-9250 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 988
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Smith, S.R.; Briggs, K.; Bourassa, M.A.; Elya, J.; Paver, C.R.
Title Shipboard automated meteorological and oceanographic system data archive: 2005-2017 Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
Year 2018 Publication Geoscience Data Journal Abbreviated Journal Geosci Data J
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 73-86
Keywords data stewardship; marine meteorology; open data access; quality control; thermosalinograph
Abstract Since 2005, the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative has been collecting, quality-evaluating, distributing, and archiving underway navigational, meteorological, and oceanographic observations from research vessels. Herein we describe the procedures for acquiring ship and instrumental metadata and the one-minute interval observations from 44 research vessels that have contributed to the SAMOS initiative from 2005 to 2017. The overall data processing workflow and quality control procedures are documented along with data file formats and version control procedures. The SAMOS data are disseminated to the user community via web, FTP, and Thematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services from both the Marine Data Center at the Florida State University and the National Centers for Environmental Information, which serves as the long-term archive for the SAMOS initiative. They have been used to address topics ranging from air-sea interaction studies, the calibration, evaluation, and development of satellite observational products, the evaluation of numerical atmospheric and ocean models, and the development of new tools and techniques for geospatial data analysis in the informatics community. Maps provide users the geospatial coverage within the SAMOS dataset, with a focus on the Essential Climate/Ocean Variables, and recommendations are made regarding which versions of the dataset should be accessed by different user communities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2049-6060 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Funding Approved $loc['no']
Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 979
Permanent link to this record

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