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Author Bourassa, M.A.; Vincent, D.G.; Wood, W.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Flux Parameterization Including the Effects of Capillary Waves and Sea State Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Sci.  
  Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 1123-1139  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4928 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 531  
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Author Hanley, D.E.; Bourassa, M.A.; O'Brien, J.J.; Smith, S.R.; Spade, E.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Quantitative Evaluation of ENSO Indices Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate  
  Volume 16 Issue 8 Pages 1249-1258  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding NOAA Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 480  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Weissman, D.E.; Bourassa, M.A.; Tongue, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Rain Rate and Wind Magnitude on SeaWinds Scatterometer Wind Speed Errors Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2002 Publication Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.  
  Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 738-746  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0739-0572 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 830  
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Author Smith, S.R.; Bourassa, M.A.; Sharp, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Establishing More Truth in True Winds Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.  
  Volume 16 Issue 7 Pages 939-952  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0739-0572 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding ONR, NSF, NASA Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 766  
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Author Ahern, K.; Bourassa, M.A.; Hart, R.E.; Zhang, J.A.; Rogers, R.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Observed Kinematic and Thermodynamic Structure in the Hurricane Boundary Layer During Intensity Change Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2019 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.  
  Volume Issue Pages  
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  Abstract The axisymmetric structure of the inner-core hurricane boundary layer (BL) during intensification [IN; intensity tendency &#8805; 20 kt (24 h)&#8722;1], weakening [WE; intensity tendency < &#8722;10 kt (24 h)&#8722;1], and steady-state [SS; the remainder] periods are analyzed using composites of GPS dropwindsondes from reconnaissance missions between 1998 and 2015. A total of 3,091 dropsondes were composited for analysis below 2.5 km elevation—1,086 during IN, 1,042 during WE, and 963 during SS. In non-intensifying hurricanes, the lowlevel tangential wind is greater outside the radius of maximum wind (RMW) than for intensifying hurricanes, implying higher inertial stability (I) at those radii for non-intensifying hurricanes. Differences in tangential wind structure (and I) between the groups also imply differences in secondary circulation. The IN radial inflow layer is of nearly equal or greater thickness than nonintensifying groups, and all groups show an inflow maximum just outside the RMW. Non-intensifying hurricanes have stronger inflow outside the eyewall region, likely associated with frictionally forced ascent out of the BL and enhanced subsidence into the BL at radii outside the RMW. Equivalent potential temperatures (&#952;e) and conditional stability are highest inside the RMW of non-intensifying storms, which is potentially related to TC intensity. At greater radii, inflow layer &#952;e is lowest in WE hurricanes, suggesting greater subsidence or more convective downdrafts at those radii compared to IN and SS hurricanes. Comparisons of prior observational and theoretical studies are highlighted, especially those relating BL structure to large-scale vortex structure, convection, and intensity.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 1031  
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Author Zheng, Y.; Ali, M.M.; Bourassa, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contribution of Monthly and Regional Rainfall to the Strength of Indian Summer Monsoon Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2016 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.  
  Volume 144 Issue 9 Pages 3037-3055  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 60  
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Author Holbach, H.M.; Uhlhorn, E.W.; Bourassa, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Off-Nadir SFMR Brightness Temperature Measurements in High-Wind Conditions Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Abbreviated Journal J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.  
  Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 1865-1879  
  Keywords Tropical cyclones; Wind; Air-sea interaction; Microwave observations; Remote sensing; Surface observations  
  Abstract Wind and wave-breaking directions are investigated as potential sources of an asymmetry identified in off-nadir remotely sensed measurements of ocean surface brightness temperatures obtained by the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) in high-wind conditions, including in tropical cyclones. Surface wind speed, which dynamically couples the atmosphere and ocean, can be inferred from SFMR ocean surface brightness temperature measurements using a radiative transfer model and an inversion algorithm. The accuracy of the ocean surface brightness temperature to wind speed calibration relies on accurate knowledge of the surface variables that are influencing the ocean surface brightness temperature. Previous studies have identified wind direction signals in horizontally polarized radiometer measurements in low to moderate (0&#65533;20 m s&#8722;1) wind conditions over a wide range of incidence angles. This study finds that the azimuthal asymmetry in the off-nadir SFMR brightness temperature measurements is also likely a function of wind direction and extends the results of these previous studies to high-wind conditions. The off-nadir measurements from the SFMR provide critical data for improving the understanding of the relationships between brightness temperature, surface wave&#65533;breaking direction, and surface wind vectors at various incidence angles, which is extremely useful for the development of geophysical model functions for instruments like the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD).  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0739-0572 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 980  
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Author Steffen, J.; Bourassa, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Barrier Layer Development Local to Tropical Cyclones based on Argo Float Observations Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physical Oceanography Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 48 Issue 9 Pages 1951-1968  
  Keywords SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURE; UPPER-OCEAN RESPONSE; NINO SOUTHERN-OSCILLATION; MIXED-LAYER; INDIAN-OCEAN; HEAT-BUDGET; NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS; HURRICANES; VARIABILITY; PACIFIC  
  Abstract The objective of this study is to quantify barrier layer development due to tropical cyclone (TC) passage using Argo float observations of temperature and salinity. To accomplish this objective, a climatology of Argo float measurements is developed from 2001 to 2014 for the Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and central Pacific basins. Each Argo float sample consists of a prestorm and poststorm temperature and salinity profile pair. In addition, a no-TC Argo pair dataset is derived for comparison to account for natural ocean state variability and instrument sensitivity. The Atlantic basin shows a statistically significant increase in barrier layer thickness (BLT) and barrier layer potential energy (BLPE) that is largely attributable to an increase of 2.6 m in the post-TC isothermal layer depth (ITLD). The eastern Pacific basin shows no significant changes to any barrier layer characteristic, likely due to a shallow and highly stratified pycnocline. However, the near-surface layer freshens in the upper 30 m after TC passage, which increases static stability. Finally, the central Pacific has a statistically significant freshening in the upper 20-30 m that increases upper-ocean stratification by similar to 35%. The mechanisms responsible for increases in BLPE vary between the Atlantic and both Pacific basins; the Atlantic is sensitive to ITLD deepening, while the Pacific basins show near-surface freshening to be more important in barrier layer development. In addition, Argo data subsets are used to investigate the physical relationships between the barrier layer and TC intensity, TC translation speed, radial distance from TC center, and time after TC passage.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3670 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ user @ Serial 970  
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Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
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  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ mfield @ Serial 371  
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Author Hoffman, R.N.; Privé, N.; Bourassa, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comments on “Reanalyses and Observations: What's the Difference?” Type $loc['typeJournal Article']
  Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 98 Issue 11 Pages 2455-2459  
  Keywords GEOPHYSICAL DATA; marine surface winds; energy and water cycles  
  Abstract Are there important differences between reanalysis data and familiar observations and measurements? If so, what are they? This essay evaluates four possible answers that relate to: the role of inference, reliance on forecasts, the need to solve an ill-posed inverse problem, and understanding of errors and uncertainties. The last of these is argued to be most significant. The importance of characterizing uncertainties associated with results—whether those results are observations or measurements, analyses or reanalyses, or forecasts—is emphasized.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Funding Approved $loc['no']  
  Call Number COAPS @ rl18 @ Serial 990  
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