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NOTE:  These talks are usually scheduled for the first Monday of each month (but the beginning of the semester and a Monday holiday change that for this month). The first talk starts at 11:00AM. Each talk is typically 12 minutes long (similar to many professional meetings), with 8 minutes for questions. Unless otherwise indicated, COAPS seminars and colloquia are are held in the COAPS Conference Room located at 2000 Levy Ave, Innovation Park


Monday, July 1

Randy Bruno-Piverger, BS Student, Depts. of Computer Science and Philosophy
Title:
Administering Quality Control Flags to Observational Weather Data with Neural Network Predictive Models
Description:
The talk will review the results and methodology of my undergraduate research project, in which, I set out to determine the feasibility of using predictive models to apply the effective equivalent of visual quality control flags to weather data collected from minute by minute observations from Research Vessels.

Brian Haynes, MS Student, Meteorology, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
Title:
Reduced Static Stability in the Arctic Troposphere and its Role in the Arctic Ocean Circulation
Description:
While the Arctic continues to warm at an alarming rate, there are questions as to how the modified atmospheric circulation will interact with the air-sea boundary layer in the Arctic Ocean. Of particular interest is the Beaufort Gyre, which has been in the positive, anti-cyclonic phase of the Arctic Ocean Oscillation (AOO) for around two decades. Typically, the positive phase coincides with a cool, dry Arctic; however this is certainly not the case in the modern era. This work hopes to show that the upper troposphere is more able to influence the boundary layer as the atmosphere becomes less stratified in a warming climate.

Amit Bhardwaj, Post Doctoral Scholar, Meteorology
Title:
Understanding Seasonal Variations of Peninsular Florida
Description:
We introduce an objective definition for the onset and demise of the winter season over Peninsular Florida (PF). This entails to first define the summer season based on precipitation analysis followed by using surface temperature analysis to discern the onset and demise of the winter season. As a consequence of this definition, the full seasonal cycle is shifted and the length of the seasons varies from year to year. We find that accounting for variations in the length of the seasons across PF is important to gauge climate variability as the coefficient of variation in seasonal length ranges anywhere from 18 to 44%. The onset date variations have a robust relationship with the corresponding seasonal length anomalies across PF for all seasons. We also find that the iconic ENSO teleconnection over PF is exclusive to the seasonal rainfall anomalies and it does not affect the variations in the length of the winter season.


Monday, August 5

Shuhang (Thea) Xue, MS Student, Meteorology, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
Title:
To Be Announced

Morgan Shaner, PhD Student, Oceanography, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
Title:
To Be Announced

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Phone: (850) 644-4581
Fax: (850) 644-4841
contact@coaps.fsu.edu

© 2019 Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS)